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Gallifreya
Hello again all you lovely people here on the Glasgow Guide message boards. biggrin.gif I have a new question for you today. Whilst researching my Glasgow family history I have found out that a relative of mine, who lived on Society Row, died in Barnhill Poor House in 1917. Does anyone on this board know whereabouts in the city Barnhill Poor House may have been located, or anything at all about it? I am coming up to Glasgow for a few days soon to have a sentimental look around at all the places where my family were born, lived and died. I have a lot of information already, much of it thanks to you great folks here on these boards, but I never heard of Barnhill Poor House. Cheers Gallifreya
GG
Hi Gallifreya, Barnhill Poor House was renamed Foresthall House and Hospital in 1945 and was located just of Peterhill Road in the north east of the city in Balornock/Springburn. Here's some info about it I found on the Springburn Virtual Museum site:

QUOTE
The Poorhouse of the Barony Parish, known as Barnhill, opened in 1850. 'Paupers' who could not support themselves were sent here and were obliged to work at jobs such as bundling firewood, picking oakum (separating tarred rope fibres) and breaking rocks.

The hours were long and the inmates worked unpaid under extremely poor conditions, with harsh discipline and dreadful food. In 1905 the City Parish Poorhouse in Parliamentary Road closed and its inmates went to Barnhill, making it the largest poorhouse in Scotland.

In 1945 it was renamed Foresthall House and Hospital and was thereafter used as an old people's hospital and residential home. It was demolished in the late 1980s and a private housing development now stands on the site.


I can still remember the original buildings which were situated on a small hill seen behind the large stone walls from Peterhill Road. As the piece says, it was recently (5-10 years) replaced by a private housing development.

The photo from SVM is attached (in the background are some of the Red Road flats which were once the tallest housing developments in Europe and themselves possibly soon to be demolished) and here is the web address for further exploration:

http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/springburn/spring043.htm

GG.

Heatherbank Museum of Social Work/GCU.
GG
...and more:

QUOTE
A view of the buildings and grounds at Foresthall Hospital from the main drive approaching the hospital, 1975. The buildings were erected as an extension to Barnhill Poorhouse in 1904, to provide extra staff accommodation and stables.

The 1904 extension also included the workhouse, sometimes referred to as the "test house". The suitability of applicants for relief was "tested" here - they were set to work at oakum picking, basket-weaving or some other monotonous or onerous task to "prove" they were deserving poor in desperate need for parochial assistance, and not malingerers or other undeserving cases. If they refused to work or proved "difficult", they might be shut up in a special single punishment cell.

The end of the poorhouse system came in 1930 with the repeal of the Poor Law Amendment Act, which had made the poorhouse the only legal source of relief. But it was only with the post-war reforms of the 1940s that the poor law was finally removed from the statute books. Barnhill Poorhouse became Foresthall Hospital in 1945. Under the less severe regime at Foresthall, the "test house" ceased to be a workhouse and was used instead as a venue for IQ tests.


GG.

Heatherbank Museum of Social Work/GCU.
valros
I lived in Petershill Drive Multi storeys for a couple of years (long enough!!)
I used to have to walk past Forresthall Hospital to get the train to work at Barnhill Station.

Valros
Thomas
I recall passing the Forresthall Hospital on a number 8 bus from Maryhill whilst en route to visit my mother in Stobhill Hospital.

One night the bus broke down and we all had to get off and catch the next service. The number 8 bus, was in my opinion run by the Wells Fargo Stagecoach Co. I am sure it was often hijacked by Indians or some other tribes during its journey, as it often ran late, or never turned up and this night was no exception.

I was only a young boy of 12, quite unused to travelling alone on buses and very fearful of walking past the grounds of the hospital. Not because it was a 'poorhouse' as I never knew that until the last few years, but it was a large expanse of ground with trees and shrubbery all around.

It was a dark winter night, there was a fog developing and one smart ass told me to 'cut through the grounds' to get to Stobhill. Well I began that fateful journey only to get the fright of my life, as I had disturbed some 'vagrants' who were resting in the undergrowth - I bolted like lightning and made my way to Stobhill by the conventional public foot paths.

After that, each time I past Forresthall there was always an eerie sense of unease about it and although in my opinion it was a nice enough building and grounds - I was glad when they tore it down.

PS

I think the number 8 bus that was to replace the one that broke down is still driving around Glasgow - probably the driver is a mere skeleton now and if you listen you can hear his voice, 'exact fares pleaseeeeeeeeeeee'.

Ahem rolleyes.gif
valros
Yes Thomas, pulling it down was the best thing they ever did, it was bad enough looking during the day but at night---woooooooooo laugh.gif

Valros
Gallifreya
Wow, thanks for all the helpful info and pics. Sounds like a really dreadful place to end up in. My poor ancestor died in there aged 62 of chronic bronchitis which had lasted over 4 years sad.gif
Her husband however outlived her by 10 years and finally succumbed to a strangulated hernia in the Glasgow Infirmary. Funny what you find out on a death certificate.... it certainly makes me think.

Gallifreya
dennis
Hello. What became of the records of the inmates of the poorhouse? Was there a cemetery there?

Regards.
CRETESCOT
Hi, Just seen this topic! You can get access to and copies of Poor Law Applications at the Mitchell Library, Glasgow. I recently visited the Mitchell and would thank the staff for all their support and advice. I managed to get copies of Poor Law Applications made by my Grandfather who died in the Barnhill Poorhouse in 1917. Until viewing the 3-pages of information held at The Mitchell I knew little or nothing about my father's family - the contents of the PLA's were a real surprise! I found information about a host of family members, marriages, places of residence, occupations etc. that I had no knowledge of. If you have connections to Poorhouses in Glasgow visit the Mitchell Library - you may be surprised at what you discover! Good Luck.
kittenpause
I know what people are saying about the poorhouse - but I lived next door to it as a kid and - being very young, we would sneak in to the Foresthill hospital as it was then. It had lovely green grass, plants, trees and squirrels and birds to look at as well as a kids play area in the center. I remember lots of sunny days playing in there hoping not to get caught.

We never should have been there - but it was like a wonderworld to our young eyes as we didn't have nice grass, flowers, etc in our "backs", just grass and dykes (which admittedly where fun to jump)

I remember the staff as being very nice. We once saw some older boys from our street attack a nest that had chicks in. They also took upon us wee ones for getting in their way. I remember a very nice nurse lady who chased them away and also put the nest back in the tree and said she would keep an eye on it as the mummy bird may not come back now it had been tampered with. But she would make sure the bird where ok.

I also remember that at the close nearest the hospital was a guy who kept racing pigeons. RANDOM memory!

I just want you to know there was some nice things about the place.

If you go along Petershill road, with the Red Road high rise flats at your back, you will see a big wall on the right hand side (eventually) and it is the old wall of the hospital.
Guest
I thought I would add some to this. My Dad worked there until he retired in the early 80's. He was the last Doctor in the place before the social work Dept took it over.

I spent most of my summer holidays there hanging around while he worked and I even learned how to drive in the grounds when it was time for my learners.

The Hospital at that time had some homeless folks and the rest of it was a geriatric unit. It was like a jail by being divided into blocks. It didnt have ward numbers like Stobhill. It had wards which were called G block, H block and the like. Outside next to the bowling greens and abandoned tennis courts there were two out buildings called M block I think. Those looked on to the front of the Red Road flats.

The hospital had its own mortuary block which was at the top of the drive of you entered by the main gate house and went up the hill. I have fond memories of my Dad doing ward rounds and getting spoiled with sweeties from the nurses who still wore starchy white uniforms laugh.gif

There were huge big gardens and greenhouses in the place, but those were out of use when I was hanging round there as a kid. The other thing I remember was the thing was heated by underground steam pipes. It was always 150 degrees in the wards because the heat was so hot, there were millions of stray cats which lived in the duct work which were really nasty if you got near them.

My Dads name was Doctor Andrew MP Thomson. He is gone now like the hospital although my kid sister works now in Stobhill.
jamil ahmed
I grew up in glasgow from 1969 - 1973 @16 Dunhearn street. My father was a Gastroenterologist at Foresthill hospitals during that time. These pics bring back memories - now at the age of 46. I have plans to bring my kids 7 and 11 next year to visit Glasgow. Thanks for the pics of Foresthill Hospital.
Jamilahmed@gmail.com
graeme
my friend lives in a house that is built on the site of the old poor house .and ystarday her man took a pic of the new ceiling on her stairs, and caught a ghost of a little girl in 1840 to 50s clothes they are really scary. Im not sure how to add the pics to this but ill try if its possible if not there on my bebo at Graemet42
http://www.bebo.com/c/home/index.html
Tommy Owen
Doing family research showed one of my grandfathers older brothers died in Barnhill Poor House in 1918. He is described as a shipyard Labourer and lived at Provanhill Rd, so why was he in a Poor House?

Also I worked for a couple of years out of the Ambulance Station at Petershill Rd, where would Barnhill (later Foresthall Hosp) be in relation to the ambulance base?

My branch of the family have always been Greenockians so I don't know Glasow that well.
Glesga Trotter
A.Doing family research showed one of my grandfathers older brothers died in Barnhill Poor House in 1918. He is described as a shipyard Labourer and lived at Provanhill Rd, so why was he in a Poor House?

B.Also I worked for a couple of years out of the Ambulance Station at Petershill Rd, where would Barnhill (later Foresthall Hosp) be in relation to the ambulance base?

C.My branch of the family have always been Greenockians so I don't know Glasow that well.

AA.Sorry, I can't help you there.

BB.Is the Ambulance Station at the Fire Station on Midton Street ? See attached P60310-A.
Foresthall Hospital was bounded on the north and east sides by Avonspark Street, on the west side by Edgefauld Road and on the south side by Petershill Road.See attached P60310-A.

CCClick to view attachment.Fair enough.

wee davy
QUOTE
so why was he in a Poor House?

If his occupation was described as shipyard labourer, in a census, or even in some poorhouse parish record, it doesn't mean he was actually working when he died - or indeed wasn't injured in the Great War, and as what did happen to a lot of people, was UNABLE to work due to his injuries, and this was all the 'welfare' he was afforded!
Suggest you check Archive sites, for him - mentioned in dispatches etc if u haven't done so already.

My theory was not an uncommon experience for our forces in those days.

good luck Glesca Trotter
wellfield
Good answer Davy!...Never thought about that..some of these people probably had a very productive life before going to Barnhill..you never know what will become of your life.As a youngster (in the 50's) I'd see the residents walk and sit on the benches on the beautifull grounds as the place was next to where I lived,I knew people that worked there and as I said before,never heard any horror stories...
Ed Boyle
Is someone died there in 1924 (as a pauper), where would they likely be buried?

Thanks,
Ed.
*North Canalbank St*
QUOTE (Ed Boyle @ 27th Jul 2010, 06:02pm) *
Is someone died there in 1924 (as a pauper), where would they likely be buried?

Thanks,
Ed.


Sighthill Cemetery
Guest
Should point out the term "You'll have me in Foresthall" and no doubt Barnhill before it, was used by people to annoy those asking for a loan of money.

The Southern General was another famous poorhouse of its time.
Notice the old buildings are being knocked down as i write this.

Nobody should ever forget Barnhill was a prison for the crime of poverty.
Chris_C
My Great Great Grandfather died in there in Dec 1908. There was no official record of where he was laid to rest, it took me a lot of research to discover that paupers were loaded onto a cart and taken up to sighhill in the middle of the night. Very sad indeed.

As an earlier poster said, the mitchell library has all the barnhill records available and they are fascinating.

chris
Vambo
QUOTE (Chris_C @ 11th Aug 2010, 12:43pm) *
My Great Great Grandfather died in there in Dec 1908. There was no official record of where he was laid to rest, it took me a lot of research to discover that paupers were loaded onto a cart and taken up to sighhill in the middle of the night. Very sad indeed.

As an earlier poster said, the mitchell library has all the barnhill records available and they are fascinating.

chris

Hi there.

Just thought I would leave a comment on how interesting this board has been. I was researching my family history and shock, gasp, horror! discovered on my grandfathers birth certificate that he was quote, 'born in Barnhill Poorhouse' 'illegitimate' being the term entered under fathers name. This was in 1898. I dread to think of how his mother would have been treated by the caring staff at the institution.

He did however survive his time there and fulfilled his role as part of the poverty stricken working classes and fought the 14-18 war on the fields of France at the age of sixteen. He somehow survived this too and I am here today in part thanks to him and also my father. He also fulfilled his role when he signed up in 1938, at the age of seventeen, for the next instalment. 'Ah the good old days eh!!!!'

Both my father and grandfather were good,decent, solid, hard working, men who did their best for their families and their neighbours. They were however both unfortunate to have been young at a time when the working classes had a missed placed sense of duty and whose real use was to be cannon fodder to be used 'as required'. It's only now I am older (just turned 50) that I understand the true extent of what they experienced from the cradle to the grave. It has made me realise that things don't change that much in a hundred years.

Vambo
joan mcateer
Hi ,
I have researched lots of branches of my family. My mothers grandmothers name was Catherine Kerr she died in 1885 aged 18 shortly after giving birth to her daughter Agnes.
Catherine's husband Henry eventually became an inmate at Barnhill Poorhouse on two occassions.
I visited The Mitchell Library and held the book with his application details. He died there in 1892 aged 26 from a brain tumour.
Agnes appears to have been brought up by her maternal grandfather Francis Smillie and went on to marry my grandfather George Mcleod. Agnes and George then went on to have a large family, my mother being one of them. They too died relatively young and I never got to meet them. My mother was only twelve when they passed.
The staff at the Mitchell Library said there were no records of burial sites for inmates. I would have liked the opportunity to visit his grave as I am sure none of his family knew of his plight.
A lot of my research was done through Scotlands People and I would recommend it to anyone looking to get to know there family history.
Make the most of the time you have and the family around you.
mlconnelly
My 2x great gandfather also died in Barnhill. Before being sent there he had been in Stobhill Hospital. Apparently when nothing more could be done to treat you in the hospital you were then sent to Barnhill Infirmary to either recuperate or die.
As other have said before Mitchell Library is a treasuretrove of info. The particular ancestor I mentioned also came from Greenock so I went down to have a look at the archive there and it appears someone at some point decided to destroy the Poor Records. So disappointing as my 3x great grandmother was also listed an "in receipt of anuity from the parish" (hope I'v spelled it right).
the brauns
This is in reply to Joan Macateer from a few posts above. My gr gr grandmother married a William Kerr in 1874 after she was widowed from my gr gr grandfather, John Mulhinch. William Kerr, age 30, was listed as the son of George Kerr and Sarah Kennedy (ms) Kerr. I also found this on Scotland's People website. I am wondering if perhaps could be the same Kerr family. Together, William Kerr and Sarah Jane Mulhinch Kerr had a daughter, also Sarah, in 1875.

My gr gr grandmother, Sarah Jane Mulhinch, died in Barnhill Poorhouse in 1903. I would love to search the Mitchell records for information on her but that will have to wait until my next visit to Glasgow.
Kathryn Murray
I only recently discovered that this ancestor who was assistant governor at Barnhill in the 1880s, also committed suicide there with an over dose of laudenum in 1888. With his association with Barnhill is there a chance that there is a photograph of him out there somewhere?
seamus1954
Barnhill Poorhouse , My Maternal Greatgranddad William John Long's Death Certificate Has as place of Death as 603 Edgefauld Road formally lived at 428 Rutherglen Rd in 1941 would there any information on this was this Barnhill??? Sincerely the newest "Kid" on the Block seamus Oh MY GOD just reading some of the comments below WOW
ashfield
QUOTE (seamus1954 @ 28th Jun 2012, 05:28am) *
Barnhill Poorhouse , My Maternal Greatgranddad William John Long's Death Certificate Has as place of Death as 603 Edgefauld Road formally lived at 428 Rutherglen Rd in 1941 would there any information on this was this Barnhill??? Sincerely the newest "Kid" on the Block seamus Oh MY GOD just reading some of the comments below WOW


Welcome to the boards seamus1954, it looks like the address you have was Barnhill. The other address would have been in the Gorbals or close by. The route of the road has changed considerably over the years.
seamus1954
Barnhill on CLOSER inspection the address was 657 not 603 the record is hardto read in some parts thank you for the information
seamus1954
Barnhill Poorhouse On the 1911 census of Scotland Grandpop Long was listed as a "Inmate' In the United States that has another meaning !!!! At Cumbanauld Dunbarton ??? I know He Died at 657 Edgefauld Road Barnhill was this another place earler in His life ???
cathy52
my gt aunt susan kelly was in barnhill poorhouse 1922-24 after her husband left her and her son, would she have been seperated from her son during her stay there and then she asked to be transferred to kyle poorhouse in ayr. sad.gif
mlconnelly
It would depend on how old her son was Cathy52. If he was old enough to work, most likely he would have been separated from her. Mary
cathy52
her son would have been 2 or 3, hope she got him back. sad.gif
mlconnelly
I think it would be safe to say that he probably stayed with her at that young age. Hope she didn't stay long. Mary
cathy52
going down to ayr in the next two weeks to see if i can find any information on her while she was in kyle poorhouse, as she was in and out of different poorhouses and hospital for a few years after her husband left her and her son. hope it has a happy ending for her as she was only 22yrs till about 25yrs old. sad.gif
GlasgowVisitor
I've noticed a couple of posters referring to poor law records held when this place was Barnhill, would the Mitchell hold any similar information relating to it as Foresthall, my mum spent a short time in a homeless unit there as a little kid in the 70s. Her parents were very proud people and after they got back on their feet, their time in Foresthall was never spoken of sad.gif
mlconnelly
GlasgowVisitor, Barnhill and Foresthall are one and the same, the name changed in 1945. As far as I'm aware, the Mitchell Library hold Poor Law records up until 1923 but they might be able to tell you where to find further info. Mary
Tennscot
I just happened to notice Barnhill posts. As a boy I lived just around the corner in Wellfield St.,Went to Wellfield Elementery School. A class mate of mines lived there. I
Tennscot
I just happened to notice Barnhill posts. As a boy I lived just around the corner in Wellfield St.,Went to Wellfield Elementery School. A class mate of mines lived there. I had a very different perspective of the place. His father was Chief or head engineer and lived in a lovely big house with a garden. I think they even had a piano. I think this would be around 1942/3/4.Of course I really didn`t see the rest. I was mesmerized with the nice grounds etc. Later on while rationing was still on, this punter who worked in Barnhill used to sell my father a couple of pounds of meat(probably nicked out of the kitchens) then he`d use the money to put a bet on with my father. Win Win situation me thinks.!!
carole oconnor
HI there

Just been reading all the info on Barnhill Poor house.

I am writing a book on Scottish Suffragettes, however some of my chapters on areas of Scotland cover women's work, health and education in the 19th century leading up to women's votes.

I would be interested to hear from anyone who may have relevant info and photos.
thanks carol_oconnor@sky.com
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