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wee mags
I remember running or atlest being carried to the air raid shelter in the back yard,and the air raid wardens telling you to hurry up ,once in side you felt awe cozy for your mom never mentioned what was happening,my two older brothers would be laughing at me for I was just a wee thing about four at the time ,aand I would have this big woolen blanket that made you itchy,after we would all be setteled in ,time for the moms and dads who were there to start a wee sing song ,"When the lights go on again all over the world " was such a sad song then,"The White cliffs of Dover" and a daft George Formby song which was sung to the bango playing by the man up the road and that got everyone laughing again then ,a wee woman sang "Im a lonely little petunia in an onion patch"its funny what you remember from those days
my dad at the time worked for the RollsRoyce and he would some times have to do a 24 hour shift,and as he left I would be standing at our front window shout TaTa daddy till he rounded the corner and even then he would give me a "see yi in the morning hen" wub.gif
Avril
I have just had a novel about Glasgow published. The story starts in Possilpark in 1950 with 2 year old Linda Macgregor. It traces back to her grandparents then tells the romantic love story of her parents during the second world war. It also takes in trips 'Doon the Watter' from the Broomielaw to Rothesay, over the Forth Rail Bridge to Fife, Ruchill, Maryhill (including Jaconelli's cafe), Milton, Springburn, Glasgow City Centre and many other areas of Glasgow. When I was little in the 1950's, I listened to my parents, aunts and uncles talking about the good and bad times during the war and 'the olden days'. This has inspired me to do more research and write this tale about a fiction family growing up in Glasgow during these times. In true Glasgow fashion the humour shines through, even when times are tough! The book is called 'What's For Ye, Won't Go By Ye' (By Avril Dalziel Saunders) ISBN:1-84667-013-6. It is selling well all over the world and exceptionally well in Canada. biggrin.gif
Doug1
Last week my father died. It wasnt a sad occasion because he had reached the ripe old age of 103 and was just 6 weeks of his 104th birthday. The funny thing is that people of his generation never seem to talk much about the war and my dad was like that. It was quite late in his life that i learned that he had taught RADAR to the free polish air force during WW2. I knew he was a clever man and worked in radio during the war but i didnt know much more than that all he ever said was that he drove an ambulance part time. I think he regarded that as more important than his teaching radar. His passing means that he was probably the last person left anywhere who did this valuable work

The amazing thing about him was his love of electronics and gadgetry from his war years and less that 4 weeks before passing away he was still using his facebook and twitter accounts and still sending emails to his family and friends and had just returned from holidaying in Portugal. For all of that he was a simple modest man RIP
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Elma
Condolences to you Doug, but what wonderful memories you must have of your Dad. Savour these memories and look back on him with pride.
Doug1
QUOTE (Elma @ 5th Jun 2012, 06:53pm) *
Condolences to you Doug, but what wonderful memories you must have of your Dad. Savour these memories and look back on him with pride.

Thank you Elma for your kind words

Doug
GG
Hi Doug,

Your father sounds like he was a very special man. I'm always amazed at how many men and women did extraordinary things during the war to help win vistory, but then refused to talk about it thereafter. I think that people lived through that time and witnessed the huge loss and scarifice, but survived, always felt truly humbled.

A very sad loss. Thanks for sharing his wonderful story with us.

GG.
angel
My condolences Doug on the death of your Dad
He was one of a kind . smile.gif
Heather
My condolences to you Doug on the loss of your Dad.

I know what you mean about your dad not talking about the war as my dad was the same.
He enlisted before the war began and was in the Royal Artillery then the Royal Navy. He never spoke about the war and when one of my bro-in-law asked him about it, all he got told was, 'we had a few run's in with the Germans'. laugh.gif
Doug1
QUOTE (GG @ 7th Jun 2012, 12:06am) *
Hi Doug,

Your father sounds like he was a very special man. I'm always amazed at how many men and women did extraordinary things during the war to help win vistory, but then refused to talk about it thereafter. I think that people lived through that time and witnessed the huge loss and scarifice, but survived, always felt truly humbled.

A very sad loss. Thanks for sharing his wonderful story with us.

GG.


Thanks GG I very much appreciate your response
Doug1
QUOTE (angel @ 7th Jun 2012, 01:10am) *
My condolences Doug on the death of your Dad
He was one of a kind . smile.gif


Thanks Angel for your kind words

Doug
Doug1
QUOTE (Heather @ 7th Jun 2012, 05:43am) *
My condolences to you Doug on the loss of your Dad.

I know what you mean about your dad not talking about the war as my dad was the same.
He enlisted before the war began and was in the Royal Artillery then the Royal Navy. He never spoke about the war and when one of my bro-in-law asked him about it, all he got told was, 'we had a few run's in with the Germans'. laugh.gif


Thanks Heather. I think your right. People suffered so much during during the great wars they just seemed to prefer to shut it out of their minds. Perhaps this feeling brings home the true horrors of what our present lads and lassies and their families go through. Thank you for your kind response

Doug
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wee mags
sorry to hear of your fathers passing Doug ,he sounded like he was some kind of man ,like yout dad my oldest brother served in the second world war we did not reilize until after his death he must have bee just 17 when he joined.he served in Palestine as it was called the and he was overseas for some time ,we also never knew until he died that he had a steel plate in his head ,as you say they never spoke about it and you wondered how in the name of god they and now the young men and women are doing it today, God Bless and bring them home safely
Doug1
QUOTE (wee mags @ 7th Jun 2012, 11:17am) *
sorry to hear of your fathers passing Doug ,he sounded like he was some kind of man ,like yout dad my oldest brother served in the second world war we did not reilize until after his death he must have bee just 17 when he joined.he served in Palestine as it was called the and he was overseas for some time ,we also never knew until he died that he had a steel plate in his head ,as you say they never spoke about it and you wondered how in the name of god they and now the young men and women are doing it today, God Bless and bring them home safely


Thanks Mags and sad to hear you talk about your older brother i'm sure it must have been very difficult for you and your family with him being so young. Things like this just sort of stay with you forever dont they

Doug
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TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (Doug1 @ 7th Jun 2012, 08:13am) *
... People suffered so much during during the great wars they just seemed to prefer to shut it out of their minds ...
Doug


I was born in '44 so it was all over when I was a wee kid listenin' to the grown-ups talk about what they'd been through. I thought my da' had been in the RIP during the war until it was pointed out that he was an ARP first aider. He never went into any detail about what he'd had to shift after an air raid over Glasgow but one time when I asked my mammy what he did during the war she said, "He came home each day or night and sat in the wee room for hours on end without a word then he'd be away again the next time the sirenes blew."
zascot
I don`t think the youngsters know what they owe these people and to read that other thread- metal theft in Glasgow- where they desicrated a memorial makes me sick.
Melody
My deepest condolences to you Doug1, such a sad loss for you.

I agree that they never mentioned much about the war. My dad was in the Royal Navy and on The Russians Convoys to Murmansk. When we were young we never realised the enormity of what they had seen and done in their young lives during the war.

I have no memory of those war days as I was born after it was all over. Gran would tell me how they all dreaded a telegram boy being in the street as it was so often horrific news. One day the telegram boy came to Gran's door and the family doctor had been in the house at the time. Gran was so afraid to open the telegram that the doctor had to open it. Happily it was from her Son/ my Dad to tell that he would be coming home on leave. I can imagine the sheer relief.

Doug1
QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 7th Jun 2012, 12:21pm) *
I was born in '44 so it was all over when I was a wee kid listenin' to the grown-ups talk about what they'd been through. I thought my da' had been in the RIP during the war until it was pointed out that he was an ARP first aider. He never went into any detail about what he'd had to shift after an air raid over Glasgow but one time when I asked my mammy what he did during the war she said, "He came home each day or night and sat in the wee room for hours on end without a word then he'd be away again the next time the sirenes blew."

Said with poignancy TeeHee. i'm not sure but perhaps these were the days when it wasnt the done thing for men to show emotion "stiff upper lip" and all that sort of thing...thank goodness times have changed

Doug
Doug1
QUOTE (Melody @ 7th Jun 2012, 02:23pm) *
My deepest condolences to you Doug1, such a sad loss for you.

I agree that they never mentioned much about the war. My dad was in the Royal Navy and on The Russians Convoys to Murmansk. When we were young we never realised the enormity of what they had seen and done in their young lives during the war.

I have no memory of those war days as I was born after it was all over. Gran would tell me how they all dreaded a telegram boy being in the street as it was so often horrific news. One day the telegram boy came to Gran's door and the family doctor had been in the house at the time. Gran was so afraid to open the telegram that the doctor had to open it. Happily it was from her Son/ my Dad to tell that he would be coming home on leave. I can imagine the sheer relief.


Hi Melody and thanks. Your dad would know what fear meant being on the Russian convoys as of course would your gran constantly fearful of the dreaded telegram. All of them, in their own way, brave souls

Doug
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taurus
Reading this thread I have to give a lot of credit to the wives and mothers who showed such stoicism during what was surely the most terrifyng time of their lives. I don`t ever remember seeing a frightened expression on my mums`s face, and my dad away at sea,so she was coping single handed too,,life went on,we ate and slept and had jam sandwiches at bedtime,then in the middle of the night away to the shelter with the sirens blaring and Gerry above us,and in the shelter someone playing a wee accordian thing,,and everyone singing or just talking gossip. I just know i could never in my life show such courage if faced with such horror,yet our mothers coped,raised families and some lived well in to old age,my mother in law,lived to 101.had 6 kids at the time and got the scare when the power station at dalmarnock was bombed. True grit for sure.

Doug1
Hi Taurus. As you say it must have been very tough for the womenfolk at home having to look after their homes and families and perhaps also doing vital wartime work. They would do all this without knowing whether they would ever see their loved ones again. I guess in those days there was a great deal of community spirit around with people helping one another. I cant for the life of me imagine what it must have been like to come out of an air raid shelter to find that your house is gone, not simply damaged but completely gone. The sad thing is that at this very moment in Aleppo, Syria you have a similar situation where totally innocent men women and children are being bombed out of their houses and made to flee to safety as fighting rages all around them..so tragic
taurus
As the great man himself (Rabbie Burns) says "man`s inhumanity to man".Says it all really.
DavidT
Okinawa footage released today.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v58OpsxpFco...be_gdata_player

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