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Rab
Surprisingly, I have failed to find any topic on the subject of wartime rationing. It may be that I have missed it, so forgive me if I am duplicating a topic.
I came across this photo which was taken in 1953 on the first day that sweets were taken off the ration. The children of Britain, including me, were desperate to get their hands on some sweeities after 10 years of denial and this happy shot sees them rushing to start ruining their teeth! I lived over a wee general store which had nothing more than liquorice root, cinnamon sticks and the like in the window for my childhood years. I remember going in and buying Chiclets chewing gum for a penny (lasted longer than anything else!) and swapping some with my pals who had bought other sweetie items.

Click to view attachment
Dave Grieve
Don,t really remember sweeties as such being taken of rations but I think that must have been when sugar was taken off and remember it was a big thing for all the woman in the street who used to gather outside our close.

All I do remember was my Granda giving me a penny a few times a week and on the way to school it was normally Four chocolate caramels at a farthing each, used to last me ages. laugh.gif

Just out of interest what other major event connected to the second world war happened in 1953?

I should really put this in the 'On this day' topic but cant remember the exact date.
dugald_old
Thank you for a real slice of reality with that picture Rab. So meaningful. I recall the rationing of course, but not the crowded rush into the sweetie shops. I enjoyed a similar dash in 1959 when for the first time in about ten years, I realised I could buy all the chocolates in any shop in Scotland I wanted--- without my wee pink 2-ounces-a- week- ration card. Great picture.
Dylan
I remember going to the Odeon Club on a Saturday morning circa 1948.

I was given 1/ and a ration coupon.

6d for a Mars Bar, purchased from Newsagents and 6d for entry to the Odeon.

It could have been 6d, 3d for both ?

It took me a long time to like a Banana as I had never seen one.

Acquired taste. !
JAGZ1876
QUOTE (Dylan @ 12th Dec 2013, 05:29pm) *
6d for a Mars Bar, purchased from Newsagents and 6d for entry to the Odeon.


Are you sure a Mars bar was 6d in 1948, as i remember a Mars bar costing 6d the day before decimalisation in 1971 and being outraged at it costing 3 new pence, meaning it had gone up 1d the next day.
bilbo.s
QUOTE (JAGZ1876 @ 12th Dec 2013, 07:02pm) *
Are you sure a Mars bar was 6d in 1948, as i remember a Mars bar costing 6d the day before decimalisation in 1971 and being outraged at it costing 3 new pence, meaning it had gone up 1d the next day.



I reckon 3d and the Odeon club was the same about that time.

In retrospect, I have always wondered why rationing lasted so long - 8 or 9 years after the war. Surely this was due to government incompetence. I well remember on my first trip abroad, to Belgium in 1953, seeing huge amounts of meat being served in our hotel. My aunts remarked that a plateful was about a week's ration back home.

My first experience of being abroad opened my eyes to a whole new world and left me forever discontented with my homeland.
Betsy2009
Oh bilbo, I do hope you mean the way the country was 'managed' rather than beautiful Scotland itself.
bilbo.s
QUOTE (Betsy2009 @ 12th Dec 2013, 07:34pm) *
Oh bilbo, I do hope you mean the way the country was 'managed' rather than beautiful Scotland itself.


Well, Betsy, of course the Scottish scenery is far superior to Belgium's. cool.gif
JAGZ1876
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 12th Dec 2013, 06:24pm) *
I well remember on my first trip abroad, to Belgium in 1953, seeing huge amounts of meat being served in our hotel. My aunts remarked that a plateful was about a week's ration back home.


Would that have been horse meat by any chance bilbo?
bilbo.s
QUOTE (JAGZ1876 @ 12th Dec 2013, 08:15pm) *
Would that have been horse meat by any chance bilbo?



It could have been, Jagz, but I had no way of knowing, only being familiar with mutton pies and sausages at that time.
dugald_old
During this time I believe German prisoners of war in the U.K. were fed more than the British public were. The Geneva Convention I believe protected the nutritional needs of the defeated enemy, but not that of the victors. Germans in Germany were pretty well fed in 1948. We didn't have anyone to help us.

Britain was flat broke and couldn't pay its debts. In the winter of 1947 the government had to send a very large part of their armed forces home because they could not keep them warm. Ships at this time were loading coal on the Clyde for shipment to India, a meagre contribution to paying off the enormous debt. (Oh, we managed to pay it off in 2006!!!!).

Yes, perhaps you're right Bilbo, it was due to government incompetence. Instead of our foolhardy course we should simply have given the Führer the world on a plate! Cheaper, much less blood and so on. Sieg Heil!

JAGZ1876
QUOTE (dugald @ 12th Dec 2013, 07:45pm) *
Ships at this time were loading coal on the Clyde for shipment to India, a meagre contribution to paying off the enormous debt. (Oh, we managed to pay it off in 2006!!!!).


We huh.gif Was Canada contributing as well?
Dylan
Many Ex Pats. still consider themselves Scottish/British .!

We, plural form of you.?
Rab
I remember a Mars Bar being 3d in the late 40s as I usually bought one on the way to the 'SatMat' - needed a coupon though! Gave my wee brother half.

Sweets were rationed to between 16 oz (454 g) per month and 8 oz (227 g) per month. 12 oz (340 g) per month in 1945.

February 1953: Sweet rationing ended.
September 1953: Sugar rationing ended.
4 July 1954: Meat and all other food rationing ended in Britain.
Talisman
QUOTE (Betsy2009 @ 12th Dec 2013, 06:34pm) *
Oh bilbo, I do hope you mean the way the country was 'managed' rather than beautiful Scotland itself.

Had you been brought up in glorious Guvin at the end of the war as I was, you may have had a similar perspective to "Beautiful Scotland"as I had. Like the previous poster I also visited Belgium in the 50s and like him I formed a sorry opinion of Scotland. Not of the country but of the conditions. The Belgians lived in real houses, not dirty dank closes with no indoor toilets, smelly gas lit corridors built to house yard workers in the 19th century. They also dressed to go to manual work, there were no middens and air raid shelters roon' the wash hooses. In comparison yard workrers whose ranks I eventually joind, had the spoken often attitude "that anythings good enough for work". The abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables at the bi-wekly markets was quite abundant and as we were on the coast the sea food was plentifull and excellent. Although we were in a holiday town, the overall afluence in comparison to Scotland's was marked at every instance. I did leave Scotland, not just for that reason, but for lack of any prospect of employment for one such as my self and many others like me. I have prospered to an extent I never would have in the Scotland of my youth. Yes the country is beautiful, but to a second class citizen in the land of my birth and my ancestors for a millenium, I left and have no regrets.
taurus
QUOTE (Dave Grieve @ 13th Dec 2013, 12:54am) *
Don,t really remember sweeties as such being taken of rations but I think that must have been when sugar was taken off and remember it was a big thing for all the woman in the street who used to gather outside our close.

All I do remember was my Granda giving me a penny a few times a week and on the way to school it was normally Four chocolate caramels at a farthing each, used to last me ages. laugh.gif

Just out of interest what other major event connected to the second world war happened in 1953?

I should really put this in the 'On this day' topic but cant remember the exact date.

Just wondering how old you are,?? I`m coming on 75 and farthings were out of existence when I came along,well when I was old anough to go to the shop,maybe 5 years old onwards,
Dave Grieve
QUOTE (taurus @ 13th Dec 2013, 08:03am) *
Just wondering how old you are,?? I`m coming on 75 and farthings were out of existence when I came along,well when I was old anough to go to the shop,maybe 5 years old onwards,


Hi Taurus, you must have come from a really rich family, well most were compared to mine biggrin.gif but as far as I know the farthing was still in use right throughout the 50's
bilbo.s
I was surprised to read that the farthing only ceased to be legal tender 31st December 1960, but I do not remember many being in circulation. I remember well the wee Jenny wren on the coin, but my memory is that they were a rarity in my youth.
taurus
I can assure you Dave ,we were poorer than field mice,but never in my life did I go in a shop with a farthing,a ha`pnny was the smallest coin I knew. On an odd occasion if I found a farthing in the street and thought I was in the money,my mum told me it was useless no-one in the shops would take them.So that`s the truth,if I ever had as much as tuppence,I thought I was rich.
angel
Maybe I was about 7yrs of age at this time ...

We were having a spelling lesson in our class and when it was my turn , the teacher asked me to spell ' Farthing ' which I did and also we said the word .... then she told me again to spell farthing , "I thought that I had misspelled , so I did , once more spell farthing . she then grabbed my collar and walked me to a corner of the classroom stuffed a dictionary in my hand , telling me to study the word farthing , Now this Halfwit of a teacher never once explained why this humiliation against me was happening .

My spelling was correct , but when I said the word , I pronounced it , Farding " this whole episode probably lasted 30mins. or more Until I said the word as it was printed in the dictionary " , Hyphenated , Far-thing , sad.gif
Heather
Angel, I bet you never spelt farthing wrong again. ohmy.gif

I remember Rationing.

My mum used to get my eldest brother up early on a Saturday morning to go and wait in the queue at the Butcher until she got the rest of us younger one's dressed and fed. You had to be the queue early so we could have some butcher meat as it sold out very quick.

When we got our pocket money on Saturday, we went quickly off to the sweetie shop with our coupons to get sweets.
angel
QUOTE (Heather @ 14th Dec 2013, 12:30pm) *
Angel, I bet you never spelt farthing wrong again. ohmy.gif

I remember Rationing.

My mum used to get my eldest brother up early on a Saturday morning to go and wait in the queue at the Butcher until she got the rest of us younger one's dressed and fed. You had to be the queue early so we could have some butcher meat as it sold out very quick.

When we got our pocket money on Saturday, we went quickly off to the sweetie shop with our coupons to get sweets.



Hi Heather , My crime that morning was not my spelling , ... that was
correct , the problem was , how I pronounced the word , it sounded
like I was saying " farding " and not farthing with a ...... TH . biggrin.gif
Heather
Mea Culpa, Mea Maxima Culpa. sad.gif
angel
And for your penance my child , just say a decade of the Rosary. biggrin.gif
serabash
does the catholic connection not take us off topic? why do some posters bring everything down to the chapel the mass the rosary, father magubligan. do all the non catholics really need tae be bombarded with this. no other people of faith bring their church into most topics. you can call me all the bigots you like but I am sorry you folk are the ones always talking about your religion on an open board. why not consider others that think your church is not the one true church.
Heather
tongue.gif : rolleyes.gif
serabash
just the response I expected. your pals will be round any minute.
dugald_old
I enjoyed your "farthing" tale Angel. I'd call it very humorous and I'll wager the teacher's colleagues in the staff-room all thought it was homorous too, when she regaled them with your innocent attempts at pronouncing this difficult for-a-seven-year-old word.

But just a wee minute, the half-hour session with it wasn't all just funny, and I'm not talking about your humiliation either. I'm talking about the behavior of this "Halfwit of a teacher". First of all, I don't think she was a "Halfwit of a teacher". I think she demonstrated her excellence as a teacher. Think of how much easier it would have been for her to simply have said: "C'mon Angel, we pronounce it as, "far-thing ", and got on with the rest of her lesson. She wouldn't have "wasted" half an hour's teaching time--- and perhaps you and the rest of the class still wouldn't know how to pronounce "farthing"! How many school lessons do you remember... yes, not many, but you remember that one. Therein lies the reason for my commendation of the teacher.
wombat
QUOTE (angel @ 14th Dec 2013, 04:41pm) *
And for your penance my child , just say a decade of the Rosary. biggrin.gif


ABRACADABRA ALACAZAM tongue.gif laugh.gif

taurus
You `re being too kind Dugald,the teacher was a sadist to treat a 7 year old like that,very few people who read this board will NOT have suffered at the hands of a sadist schoolteacher,who knows what damage that sort of treatment would do to a child`s self esteem in later years. To be humiliated in front of 40 sniggering kids,who are sitting smugly glad it`s not them this time. Been there,it`s awful. Off the thread a thousand aplogies
angel
QUOTE (dugald @ 14th Dec 2013, 08:39pm) *
I enjoyed your "farthing" tale Angel. I'd call it very humorous and I'll wager the teacher's colleagues in the staff-room all thought it was homorous too, when she regaled them with your innocent attempts at pronouncing this difficult for-a-seven-year-old word.

But just a wee minute, the half-hour session with it wasn't all just funny, and I'm not talking about your humiliation either. I'm talking about the behavior of this "Halfwit of a teacher". First of all, I don't think she was a "Halfwit of a teacher". I think she demonstrated her excellence as a teacher. Think of how much easier it would have been for her to simply have said: "C'mon Angel, we pronounce it as, "far-thing ", and got on with the rest of her lesson. She wouldn't have "wasted" half an hour's teaching time--- and perhaps you and the rest of the class still wouldn't know how to pronounce "farthing"! How many school lessons do you remember... yes, not many, but you remember that one. Therein lies the reason for my commendation of the teacher.

Dugald , that teacher did not spend 5.sec. with me , I was made to stand in that corner with
the dictionary until I pronounced farthing with a " th " sound , as she continued with the spelling lesson with the rest of the class , since that time , she was , in my adult opinion
in the wrong profession , would have done well as a warder in Barlinnie prison . No
I am wrong , she could never have handled adults .

What I do remember more importantly , is that , I learned there are many excellent teachers
and not all like she .
Thankfully our own teacher returned within a couple of weeks and she took us all the way to the
qualifying class and all of her students passed into senior secondary education , including myself ,

Now there's a great teacher , did'nt give a hoot about .. TH's or ding's .

Merry Christmas to you Dugald , hope you don't have to shovel a lot of snow
this weekend .




angel
Hi Taurus , I just read your post
It would'nt have been so bad had it been about a sixpence .
cheers . laugh.gif
bilbo.s
QUOTE (dugald @ 14th Dec 2013, 09:39pm) *
I enjoyed your "farthing" tale Angel. I'd call it very humorous and I'll wager the teacher's colleagues in the staff-room all thought it was homorous too, when she regaled them with your innocent attempts at pronouncing this difficult for-a-seven-year-old word.

But just a wee minute, the half-hour session with it wasn't all just funny, and I'm not talking about your humiliation either. I'm talking about the behavior of this "Halfwit of a teacher". First of all, I don't think she was a "Halfwit of a teacher". I think she demonstrated her excellence as a teacher. Think of how much easier it would have been for her to simply have said: "C'mon Angel, we pronounce it as, "far-thing ", and got on with the rest of her lesson. She wouldn't have "wasted" half an hour's teaching time--- and perhaps you and the rest of the class still wouldn't know how to pronounce "farthing"! How many school lessons do you remember... yes, not many, but you remember that one. Therein lies the reason for my commendation of the teacher.




wacko.gif
DannyH
QUOTE (Rab @ 12th Dec 2013, 10:33pm) *
I remember a Mars Bar being 3d in the late 40s as I usually bought one on the way to the 'SatMat' - needed a coupon though! Gave my wee brother half.

Sweets were rationed to between 16 oz (454 g) per month and 8 oz (227 g) per month. 12 oz (340 g) per month in 1945.

February 1953: Sweet rationing ended.
September 1953: Sugar rationing ended.
4 July 1954: Meat and all other food rationing ended in Britain.


Hello Rab

I am going to add an amendment to your claim (in post #1) that sweet rationing ended in February 1953. I am not arguing against your claim, but I want to put it into its proper perspective.

I completed my engineering apprenticeship in October 1952. Sweet rationing ended before my apprenticeship ended. I clearly remember going to the sweet-shop just up the road from Cathcart Railway station, during the lunch break, and joining the queue for sweets. We bought sweets so fast that the shop was cleared of them that day. I therefore suspect, unless you have some evidence that I am wrong, that the photo of the kids storming the shop, was taken about the same time.

The outcome was that sweets rationing was re-instated almost overnight, for the simple reason, the shops couldn't keep up with demand. I started my National Service in November 1952, but I don't recall sweets being rationed then. What I do remember is that there was no stampede the second time around. Everybody had got the message! I think we all had sickened ourselves off sweets for a long time.

Regards

Danny Harris
bilbo.s
Hi Danny. I found this link in support of your post.

http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/...-24-april-1949/

I must say that I have no memory of those events. I must have been content with my ration ! smile.gif
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (taurus @ 13th Dec 2013, 07:03am) *
Just wondering how old you are,?? I`m coming on 75 and farthings were out of existence when I came along,well when I was old anough to go to the shop,maybe 5 years old onwards,

When my brother was 17; and I a mere lad of seven (1951 tongue.gif ), he received as a tip given to him by a kind old lady during his time employed at Richmond Park Laundry, a wee cotton draw-string bag with the inscription Lavender nicely embroidered on it and containing at least 2/- ... all in farthings laugh.gif
They were still in existence during my school years ... although I don't remember actually spending any.
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (serabash @ 14th Dec 2013, 09:20pm) *
does the catholic connection not take us off topic? why do some posters bring everything down to the chapel the mass the rosary, father magubligan. do all the non catholics really need tae be bombarded with this. no other people of faith bring their church into most topics. you can call me all the bigots you like but I am sorry you folk are the ones always talking about your religion on an open board. why not consider others that think your church is not the one true church.

You do have to learn to stop this nonsense. This kind of responce, when left unchecked, finishes up by snowballing completely out of proportion.
Betsy2009
THH - seconded.
A daft post.
Samantha
Absolutely Tee and Betsy. A deliberate attempt at goading, twice, which only leads the thread off topic and subsequently destroys the thread altogether. Thankfully she didn't get her desired result though.

I did report the postings to GG because goading members is in direct contravention of the rules of the board and reporting is what you are urged to do in an attempt to keep threads from being hijacked by troublemakers.
GG
QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 15th Dec 2013, 12:08pm) *
You do have to learn to stop this nonsense. This kind of responce, when left unchecked, finishes up by snowballing completely out of proportion.

I totally agree, THH.

Serabash, I am sure that you know that that kind of post is not consistent with the policy on these discussion boards. I do not expect to see a repeat of it.

GG.
Rab
QUOTE (DannyH @ 15th Dec 2013, 12:02am) *
Hello Rab

I am going to add an amendment to your claim (in post #1) that sweet rationing ended in February 1953. I am not arguing against your claim, but I want to put it into its proper perspective.

I completed my engineering apprenticeship in October 1952. Sweet rationing ended before my apprenticeship ended. I clearly remember going to the sweet-shop just up the road from Cathcart Railway station, during the lunch break, and joining the queue for sweets. We bought sweets so fast that the shop was cleared of them that day. I therefore suspect, unless you have some evidence that I am wrong, that the photo of the kids storming the shop, was taken about the same time.

The outcome was that sweets rationing was re-instated almost overnight, for the simple reason, the shops couldn't keep up with demand. I started my National Service in November 1952, but I don't recall sweets being rationed then. What I do remember is that there was no stampede the second time around. Everybody had got the message! I think we all had sickened ourselves off sweets for a long time.

Regards

Danny Harris


Thanks for correction Danny, but I didn't make it up! I simply quoted Wiki, which we all know is not perfect. No big deal. thumbup.gif
Rab
A Ministry of Food Advert from 1940 read:

THE HOUSEWIFES' PAIL.

‘Because of the pail, the scraps were saved,

Because of the scraps, the pigs were saved,

Because of the pigs, the rations were saved,

Because of the rations, the ships were saved,

Because of the ships, the island was saved,

Because of the island, the Empire was saved,

And all because of the housewife's pail'

Can anyone remember this? I do!
Click to view attachment
Betsy2009
I don't remember this, Rab, but my Gran had a pail which she filled with scraps which was collected by the local small holding once a week to feed the pigs. Perhaps she started this habit during rationing the war.
Heather
I remember when my family moved to Barlanark in 1953, we had a bin just for scraps of food for the pigs.
TeeHeeHee
Our local "Broke-man" or maybe "Broak", came to empty the swill we collected in a bin outside in the garden for him to feed to his pigs ... and that was well into the '60s.
Can anyone tell me if they're familiar with the broke/broak term and where it might have originated?

Or was that just a Blantyre Expression? tongue.gif
bilbo.s
Tomi, As far as I know "brock" is the Scots word for left-over food. In my days in the hotel business, there was always a brock bin in the kitchen and farmers or somesuch would collect this at regular intervals for a small price. We called him the brockman.
angel
hello T. , sorry I do not know or heard of broke/ broak bins
but I do remember the backcourt concerts that the older children
had in the evening's with local adults as the audience and on occasions
taking part , it was really good fun and I might add lots of talent
was there .
we could forget for a little while about the war yes.gif !
Dylan
We called it " The Pigswill"

During and for a short time after the War, the Council collected it.
gardenqueen
I was born in 1951. I don't remember rationing although it was still going on when I was a baby. Farthings we never had anything to do with, the smallest denomination in use from my memory was a halfpenny. We played with farthings as toy money.

We had a pig bin round the side of the house and it smelled awful. We would all run indoors when the truck came to collect it - for the farm, presumably.

Must say I had a few surprises on this thread. The religious stuff is part of some of our lives, asides and references are made to it occasionally as to any other experiences.

The teacher thing, well, I could tell a tale or two but that was just how life was then. If I dwell on it I get angry, so, I don't.

We all had teachers we got on with and those we didn't. Still happens today, no doubt.

I was a teacher for years, senior management too. I was well qualified and experienced (still am). However, there were times when it suited me to do supply teaching (tough at times) but I would hate to think that anyone thought that I didn't have the interests of my pupils at heart.

Just my thoughts as a recent returner here. Please forgive any typing errors, for some reason it won't let me scroll to re-read my post.
Rab
Isn't it amazing how things we read on here jogs the memory. When I began work as an apprentice butcher, I quickly learned that a bin in the shop was for 'brock'. Not the same term as remembered by others but in our shop it was for scraps of meat from the counter that could be 'dressed' and prepared for sausage meat, the remainder for dogmeat. I have not heard that word for well over 50 years until now. thumbup.gif
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