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GG
The Conservative party has reacted angrily to suggestions that Scottish pupils should be taught a new self-standing subject about the history of their country. The Tory's Scottish education spokeswoman Liz Smith insisted that Scottish history was already adequately taught in schools and voiced fears about "pseudo-nationalist undertones" of the subject.

The Scottish Government had revealed last year that it intended pupils to learn about their heritage through the new subject of Scottish Studies, which would explore the country's history, literature, language and culture.

Announcing the proposal, a government spokeswoman said:
QUOTE
"It should not be left to chance whether young people have the opportunity to learn about Scotland's rich heritage.

The Scottish Government has been clear for the past year that strengthening learning about Scotland should be integral to the curriculum and, indeed, a survey last year showed that 90% of the public are on board with this approach."

This week, a group of prominent Scots launched a campaign to promote the teaching of Scottish history in schools. A group spokesman said:
QUOTE
"[We] have differing political views, but they share the idea that studying Scotland is normal and is what every country should do. It is vital to understand the country we live in and its wonderful – and sometimes questionable – achievements and to combat damaging myths of inferiority.

Do you think that Scottish kids should be taught a subject called Scottish Studies, or is the history and culture already taught to an adequate degree in our schools? What has been your experience at school regarding learning about your country?

GG.
tombro
There should be no worry about 'Scottish Studies' being part of an overall British History study. The same could be said of 'English Studies', 'Welsh Studies or 'Irish Studies' !

I suspect that Mrs/Ms/Mr Smith (the pre-name Liz could be dubious in this day of PC) is simply being xenophobic in her endeavours to please her Westminister Controllers !

How dare any so-called Scots Politician refuse the children of Scotland a right to learn of their history for any reason ?

Tombro huh.gif huh.gif
JAGZ1876
What is pseudo nationalistic about teaching one's rich history, culture and literature, is there a country in the world that doesn't teach it's own children this?
Heather
Yes schools in Scotland should teach Scottish History.
I learned Scottish History in school and I loved reading about the Scottish Kings & Queens, the Battle's with the English.
I remember our History Teacher had some of us acting out MacBeth and the three witches and dancing around the dustbin as a cauldron. Hubble bubble toil and trouble. laugh.gif
Melody
Yes, I think there should be a Scottish Studies subject taught in schools. More is the pity that the subject in fact has to be taught in schools, as historically the English have almost managed to drown out our culture since The Clearances. We are very different from the English and this should be celebrated and nurtured to my mind.
Exenon
QUOTE (JAGZ1876 @ 19th Mar 2012, 08:53am) *
What is pseudo nationalistic about teaching one's rich history, culture and literature, is there a country in the world that doesn't teach it's own children this?

Right up to higher school certificate I was taught of the Roman invasions the French revolution and its origins, the history of British India, the post James VI English Stuarts and very little else. It was many years before I realised that I had no knowledge of De Bruse, Malcom Ceaun Mor,
Mac Alpine or Wallace. Cultural genocide; when you remember that Welsh children were still being canned at school in the 60s for speaking Welsh the domination of a subject races culture and subsequent destruction of it is instrumental in destroying that country as a distinct and separate identity
Jupiter
Tory opinion in Scotland has as much credibility as Pinocchios.
bilbo.s
I am amazed to read that some Scots had no Scottish history in their syllabus. I left school in 1959 and we were taught as much Scottish history as English, if not more.
wee davy
What is pseudo nationalistic

Indeed, JAGZ! what IS 'pseudo nationalistic' - and is it a bad thing? or a GOOD thing? or ANYTHING?
Elma
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 19th Mar 2012, 12:53pm) *
I am amazed to read that some Scots had no Scottish history in their syllabus. I left school in 1959 and we were taught as much Scottish history as English, if not more.

Me too Bill, although I am older than you, I left school in 1953 (ouch!!). We did all Scottish history in High School with a sidebar of English. I remember Ethelred as an English King but know much more about our Scottish leaders, Robert the Bruce being my all-time hero. Malcolm Canmore, the Alexanders etc. are still fixed in my memory. So yes, Scottish Studies should be taught in Scottish Schools.
TeeHeeHee
Oh dear, see below. :rolleyes:
TeeHeeHee
Maybe Ms Smith is worried that the children might learn of the terrible things the English did to our ancestors or even the political treachery among our own kind to win English favour. But the children and Ms Smith might also find it amusing to learn that our ancient cave dwelling ancestors were the first to have introduced wee rivulets of running water to take their wee jobbies out of the caves meaning that the good Queen Victoria might have been the first to have a flushing throne but up north the idea was nothing new.
Scotland has an abundance in history and culture which should not be denied the children of today.
Talkin' of all time heros, mine is Dr David Livingstone the missionary explorer.
benny
Yes, of course our children should be taught Scottish history, but not to the exclusion of all other history. In common with others on the board, I found that the teaching of history in my schooldays was slanted very much towards what was termed English history - meaning the history of Britain. I learned early that Edward 1 of England was "The Hammer Of The Scots", but I was an adult before I learned that

Bruce and De Boon
Were fighting for the croon.
Bruce took his battleaxe
And knocked the bugger doon.
biggrin.gif
JAGZ1876
QUOTE (benny @ 20th Mar 2012, 12:26am) *
Yes, of course our children should be taught Scottish history, but not to the exclusion of all other history.

That won't happen benny, i learned more about Greek and trojan history at school than i did about Scottish history, like you i learned about it after i left school.
bilbo.s
You guys must be youngsters - or did I just go to a better school ? tongue.gif
GG
My secondary school experience was in Springburn during the eighties. I can't recall any Scottish history teaching at all during my education, and the modern history of Scotland was not even touched upon in Modern Studies. My fourth year project in Modern Studies was on the Solidarity rising in Gdansk, Poland. I had no knowledge of a similar expression of people power on the Clyde led by Jimmy Reid and Jimmy Airley.

At the time, Springburn was in the process of being destroyed socially and industrially by a combination of political incompetence and aggression. There was so much opportunity there for teachers to relate their teaching to what was happening in our school's community, but almost none could be bothered. The exception was one teacher of English who encouraged us to reflect on how the changes were affecting community life; he played us music – an innovation – and asked us to observe Springburn from the fourth floor window, encouraging us to write about what we saw taking place in our community below.

GG.
john.mcn
Secondary school till the mid 80's in Pollok, history from what i remember was Robert Pitt (the younger), Robert Peel and Germany during and post WW1 and the rise and fall of Hitler. No Scottish history that i remember. The British/English PM's just bored me but i must admit Germanys woes did hold my interest. Scottish history i would have liked, much better to learn the facts rather than the Hollywood version, that said FREEEEEEDDDDOOOMM!!!!!! was great wink.gif
benny
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 20th Mar 2012, 09:03am) *
You guys must be youngsters - or did I just go to a better school ? tongue.gif

I started primary school in 1953, Bilbo, so ah'm no a youngster any merr, and I went tae Cranhill Senior Secondary, no long after it opened - a great school at the time.(Early 60's)

Primary school was the worst offender as far as lack of Scottish history was concerned, but then primary school teachers were jack of all trades, not specialists in history. The Scottish stuff tended to be Robert The Bruce and the spider, Bonnie Prince Charlie and Flora MacDonald - that sort of thing - as much romantic legend as history.

Ah dae remember learning something aboot the Coveneanting period in Scottish history when ah wis at secondary, but no much else.
GG
Letter to the Herald today on the subject of Scottish Studies:
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As a recipient of a West of Scotland state education of the late 1960s and into the 70s I would like to share my memories of the subjects taught, which I remember to this day.

In primary, it was the Battle of Hastings, the Bayeux Tapestry, Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot and the Domesday Book. I can remember clearly the books and pictures on the walls of the classrooms. Of Scotland, I remember nothing. In secondary it was the American Wars of Independence, British trade unionism, the Corn Laws, Charterism and the Holy Roman Empire. Pre-Union, it seems Scotland did not exist and post-Union it was all British/English history and perspective.

It is too late to bring the perpetrators to account, but we must make sure this is now rectified for the sake of future generations of Scots.

If we don't know who we are and where we have come from, how can we be sure we know where we are going?

Mr Brown.

GG.
bilbo.s
QUOTE (GG @ 20th Mar 2012, 08:17pm) *
Letter to the Herald today on the subject of Scottish Studies:

GG.

There must have been a radical change in syllabus after I left school in 1959. I dropped history in favour of geography in 1957. I find it hard to believe that my school was alone in teaching Scottish history. unsure.gif
mlconnelly
I started school in 1965 and until I left in 1976 I don't ever recall being taught anything about Scottish history, so I pretty much agree with Mr Brown's letter. I gained my knowledge of Robert Bruce from Nigel Tranter's brilliant novel "The Bruce Trilogy". My knowledge of Scottish history is shamefully poor but I'm now learning more with the help of my friends grandson. We're off to Dumbarton Castle on Saturday to watch a re-enactment of the siege of 1640 and to learn how the Covenanters took the castle. Mary smile.gif
medevial
Scotland has enough very interesting history to warrant a specialty course of study focusing and going into detail from the earliest people to the present day.

I remember being taught about the Dál Riatans who came over from Ireland around the fifth century and how, a local pub, the Dalriada, on the Edinburgh Rd. was named after them. My history teacher at Cranhill Secondary School was Greek, but he loved Scottish history.

Some love history and others hate it, regardless of age, or race, for that matter. Scottish children with a penchant for history should be given the opportunity to learn more about their country if they have a passion for it.

Enough invaders landed on Scottish shores, and in learning about Scotland, other cultures would have to be included to make sense of it all. I hope Scottish studies become popular and available for those keen to learn.
jimmyd
QUOTE (Melody @ 19th Mar 2012, 10:26am) *
Yes, I think there should be a Scottish Studies subject taught in schools. More is the pity that the subject in fact has to be taught in schools, as historically the English have almost managed to drown out our culture since The Clearances. We are very different from the English and this should be celebrated and nurtured to my mind.

Could not agree more Jo.. most certainly Scottish Studies should be included.
A Mackinnon
QUOTE (GG @ 20th Mar 2012, 07:17pm) *
Letter to the Herald today on the subject of Scottish Studies:

GG.

I went to school in the 50's & had very little (if any) Scottish History! Mostly English...1066...forever imprinted in my brain, and some American history. Same with geography, we could all recite the Provinces of Canada & the State in the USA, but don't recall getting the same teaching for the areas in Scotland.

So, "Should Kids Learn Scottish Studies"? in a word..YES!
bilbo.s
Ah well, Glasgow High must have been a hotbed of Scottish Nationalist subversion. unsure.gif
tamhickey
I left school in 1977 with my History O grade in hand never having been taught very much in my formative years about Scottish history. The little I was taught, was in primary school and was very basic.
Secondary school teaching was very much about almost every other nation's place in the scheme of things, i.e. World War One, it's causes and effects, the reasons for the Russian Revolution, it's protagonists and how it evolved, the Corn Laws, the rise of Trade Unionism and birth of the labour party.
These were the types of things taught in the '70's with the aim of getting the pupils to pass the exams, rather than teaching pupils about their country's past and possible development, though we were told the story about the Calton Weavers, which never appeared in the exam papers.
This is the thing though, would you rather children learn about Scottish history when there's little chance of the exam board presenting a question about it or would you rather see the children pass their exams then hope they would pick up on it in later studies?
The thing to bear in mind though is that at Higher level, it gets no better as international issues are to the fore and Scottish history is left behind.
Alex MacPhee
QUOTE (GG @ 19th Mar 2012, 08:43am) *
The Conservative party has reacted angrily to suggestions that Scottish pupils should be taught a new self-standing subject about the history of their country. The Tory's Scottish education spokeswoman Liz Smith insisted that Scottish history was already adequately taught in schools and voiced fears about "pseudo-nationalist undertones" of the subject.

I believe her views should be given the widest possible publicity.

That way, everyone would see exactly why there is an excellent case for having Scottish History classes in Scottish schools.

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