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Jupiter
Corned beef is and always has been a favourite with Glaswegians and I know a lady who is very fond of it but she recently told me that she has stopped buying it as it has become too expensive.
Is there anything you have decided to give up because of price hikes?
For me it was the drink(coupled with a yellow card from the doc, rolleyes.gif )
Joop
john.mcn

I always thought that booze had come down in real terms, moreso to do with supermarkets though. 3 a pintin a pub is just shocking... I dont drive as much with fuel being so high, used to think nothing of jumping in the car and just going for a drive to wherever or visit family, nowadays it's just shopping/work.
Scotsman
I would say it was papers with me.... I realised I was buying 2 a day and more at the weekends and I just decided not too. It wasnt just because of the papers but I would go out to buy them and I would end up buying more in the newsagents and then I would maybe go into the bookies for a fly bet.

I agree that drink is a lot cheaper now than ever I can remember it.... was in the local supermarket for the first time in ages yesterday to help with the carrying home and I could not believe the price of some drink. You can get 20 bottles of top premium lager for about 60p a bottle. The same stuff costs about 3 in the pub I drink in.... although I stick to draught but that is up to 3 as well!!

Good luck with staying of the demon brew Jupiter. smile.gif
ashfield
Sorry Joop, did you say corned beef................could you speak up tongue.gif
Jupiter
Thanks Scotsman.Funny enough I stopped buying papers as well and get all the news I need on the internet.
Four years off the sauce next month,dont miss the hangovers!
rolleyes.gif
Ashfield, sometimes referred to as corned dobie.
ceader bhoy
your talking about the price of cornbeef look at the price for a bottle of ginger biggrin.gif
Jupiter
It was Lucozade for me.
TX4
The old corned dobie,For Years the staple ingredient of the Glasgow working Man's"piece".
My late Dad used to recall a funny story about an old Guy He worked with Years ago,And never had anything but corned beef for his piece.
One dinnertime the Men were discussing what they would do if they won the pools?After the usual buy a pub/house/car,The old Fella said"I would retire,Buy the lathe I work off the company,Put it in my garden shed,Teach the Wife how to operate it,And feed Her corned beef pieces 8 hours a Day,5 Day's a Week"
Rab-oldname
QUOTE (ashfield @ 15th Mar 2012, 05:29pm) *
Sorry Joop, did you say corned beef................could you speak up tongue.gif

I got it Ash! You're sharp as a razor as usual! wink.gif

It was known as 'corned dog' in my army days.
When I last sold it in 1960(!) it was 4shillings (20p) a POUND!

Women who ate too much got funny legs! laugh.gif
Dave Grieve
When I worked in Mali with average temperatures of 45c whenever a tin of corn beef was opened it would pour out like stew.
Tasted nice hot but I never did get a peece in corn beef. biggrin.gif
Jupiter
Corn beef legs.
Rab-oldname
QUOTE (Jupiter @ 16th Mar 2012, 05:15pm) *
Corn beef legs.

Thats what I said. wink.gif

QUOTE (Dave Grieve @ 16th Mar 2012, 03:13pm) *
When I worked in Mali with average temperatures of 45c whenever a tin of corn beef was opened it would pour out like stew.
Tasted nice hot but I never did get a peece in corn beef. biggrin.gif

Have they no fridges in Mali Dave? rolleyes.gif
Jupiter
Rab what you said was funny legs but nevertheless it reminded me of some women who sat too near the fire and resulted in skin on their legs akin to corned beef.Aargh!!
Rab-oldname
QUOTE (Jupiter @ 16th Mar 2012, 09:07pm) *
Rab what you said was funny legs but nevertheless it reminded me of some women who sat too near the fire and resulted in skin on their legs akin to corned beef.Aargh!!

I know that! I was making a 'funny', but it didn't work! My Mammy had a fine pair of CBL!
benny
Also sometimes known as "tartan legs".
Stewed corn beef wi ingins wis a favourite wi me, an still is. But ye hiv tae make sure tae pit the corn beef in fur jist a coupla minutes efter the ingins an veg is cooked, otherwise ye end up wi shredded. soggy corn beef. Corn beef fritters wis another auld time standby, although ah hivnae made them fur yonks - too many caloires.
wee mags
corn beef chips and beans that was our supper many nights ,and we hd woman on our street who had Tatan legs ,from siting in front of the fire all day
Jupiter
Is there anything other than corn beef you have quit because of the price rises?
Melody
Well we've had to cut down on the champagne but we still manage to run the Rolls Royce. laugh.gif

Bet the top 1% have never had it so good though.
Jupiter
Melody,Prosecco is a nice substitute but dont let them wear you down;Keep the Roller! rolleyes.gif
wombat
rolleyes.gif yep the auld corned dobbie(army issue) iwies found a bitta horse meat in it
(too stringy tae be aw beef) ennywan mind the can openers wie an angus bulls head on the blade end?


unsure.gif a whole chicken in a can ennywan mind them?
JAGZ1876
QUOTE (wombat @ 17th Mar 2012, 07:18pm) *
unsure.gif a whole chicken in a can ennywan mind them?


I do Wombat, in the 60s my mother used to get one in the xmas hamper she would save up all year to buy ( i cant remember the company who supplied the hamper) i used to love helping her open the hamper as it was full of shredded coloured paper used as packing, to a 8 year old it was like opening a treasure chest, instead of diamonds and rubies we would pull out a triangular tin of Ye Olde Oak Ham, and a jar of Robertsons mincemeat among other delights, and of course the whole chicken in a tin, i remember how my father had to open the tin at both ends and force his fist through one end to force the chicken through, as it was surrounded in jelly it made a sound that was later used in Sci Fi movies to recreate the sound of an alien bursting out of its human hosts body, and tasted just as good as that sounds.

I don't know if they still produce them, but if they do, i'll have the ham if its all the same to you biggrin.gif
benny
Aye, ah remember the tinned chicken's awright - wee scrawny things, but the jelly wis lovely.

How aboot this news item frae a coupla years ago:

A sentimental husband in Denton, Greater Manchester, has celebrated his golden wedding anniversary by eating a 50-year-old can of chicken.

Les Lailey had been saving the tin of Buxted Whole Cooked Chicken in Jelly from a buffet he and his bride Beryl received as a wedding gift – in 1956. They kept hold of the tin through numerous house moves, explaining to the BBC: “I always said 'on my 50th wedding anniversary I'm going to eat that chicken' – so I did.”

He added: “It was all right. But I don't like chicken.”

The couple ate everything else in their wedding hamper, but with post-war rationing still in effect, a whole canned chicken was a rare delicacy. Les reported: “It tasted just like ordinary chicken. A little bit salty but that was my fault for not cooking it like I should have done.”

Beryl was not too impressed with her husband's romantic gesture: “If it was a diamond ring or something like that, that would be different.”

Les apparently has felt no ill-effects from the fossilised feast. Experts say tinned food can last almost indefinitely if sealed properly, though the normal shelf life is about six months. Indeed, a panel of food scientists recently tested several foods from the seventies and found many were still palatable.

Food science professor Ted Labuza of the University of Minnesota told Wired last year that a seven-year-old canned chicken he had eaten was still "very edible".

With the ancient-chicken-eating world record safely back in British hands, canny Les Lailey now has plans to put the empty tin up for sale on eBay. "It's a part of history," he says.
Chrissie
I don't fancy any eating out of a 50 year old can of anything. This time of year fresh corn beef and cabbage are plentiful here. Irish Americans cook that with cabbage instead of ham. It's really tasty. tongue.gif
bilbo.s
Corned beef, cabbage and tatties for me with butter on the cabbage and maybe some beetroot.

I thought the tinned chicken from USA was great-it melted in your mouth. smile.gif
tombro
My first ever taste of chicken came from one of those cans !

Since that was over fifty years ago, I can't really remember what it tasted like so it can't have been outstanding.

From the same era though, I can remember the taste of my mum's stovies, totties, ham and turnip and square sausages with potatoes and well boiled cabbage !

I now eat chicken very regularly as it and pork are the cheapest meats presently available in Oz !

Tombro rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif
Jupiter
Speaking of stovies,Tombro take a look at Dustin Hoffman talking about stovies on You Tube,very funny.
rolleyes.gif
Dave Grieve
QUOTE (Rab @ 16th Mar 2012, 08:01pm) *
Thats what I said. wink.gif


Have they no fridges in Mali Dave? rolleyes.gif


I fancied a peece in Corn Beef so asked one of the locals to bring me a tin from the market, not thinking I opened it and out poured the 'stew' never tried it again laugh.gif
Exenon
QUOTE (tombro @ 18th Mar 2012, 09:04am) *
My first ever taste of chicken came from one of those cans !

Since that was over fifty years ago, I can't really remember what it tasted like so it can't have been outstanding.

From the same era though, I can remember the taste of my mum's stovies, totties, ham and turnip and square sausages with potatoes and well boiled cabbage !

I now eat chicken very regularly as it and pork are the cheapest meats presently available in Oz !

Tombro rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif

Do you remember when a side of lamb, cut up and wraped was $2. 50. Cant get a chop for that now. Living up here near Casino (where they still have Miss beef week queen, but have for obvious reasons, stopped giving them titles related to the particular breed.) I can become more than a little browned of with the sight of beef.
benny
When ma niece wis workin in India, she had tae get beef "!under the counter" frae the local butcher. The local Hindu populace didnae like their sacred cows tae end up as mince, apparently. Gaun by the wans ah've seen oan the telly, there widnae be enough meat furra coupla burgers oan them.
wombat
rolleyes.gif mibbie they"re " beggin coos" benny"? laugh.gif
Alex MacPhee
QUOTE (john.mcn @ 15th Mar 2012, 01:57pm) *
I always thought that booze had come down in real terms,

I think drink has gone up in real terms ; what has changed is that by and large, over the last quarter century or so, people have more disposable income, and therefore more to spend on non-essentials like drink, so that even though drink is relatively expensive, drink sales have increased.
Alex MacPhee
QUOTE (benny @ 18th Mar 2012, 01:30am) *
With the ancient-chicken-eating world record safely back in British hands, canny Les Lailey now has plans to put the empty tin up for sale on eBay. "It's a part of history," he says.

If he was very careful about answering the call of nature over the next twenty-four hours or so, he could put the chicken back on eBay too as a piece of history. After all, there's plenty of other crap sold regularly there.
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (TX4 @ 16th Mar 2012, 12:58pm) *
My late Dad used to recall a funny story about an old Guy He worked with Years ago,And never had anything but corned beef for his piece.

When I was doing my apprenticeship my dad was the piece maker at home. I told him once that I fancied corned beef and beetroot pieces. Nine months later I told him I fancied a change. "Wan minute yer wantin' corned beef an' beetroot next minute ye've chainged yer mind!" rolleyes.gif
For me; when it came to what to give up, it was a choice between sex and drugs and rock & roll.
I'm no' tellin' which I gave up but it saved me a bomb. tongue.gif
wombat
rolleyes.gif wifie cooked corned beef friday,wie mashed totties,carrots,green beans an zuccinis wie a white sauce. smile.gif nice
john.mcn
QUOTE (Alex MacPhee @ 24th Mar 2012, 01:37am) *
I think drink has gone up in real terms ; what has changed is that by and large, over the last quarter century or so, people have more disposable income, and therefore more to spend on non-essentials like drink, so that even though drink is relatively expensive, drink sales have increased.



Well maybe my local offies was just a rip off merchant but booze has not risen that much in the 20 odd years i used to nip down there for a 'kerry oot', whereas the likes of fuel,rent/mortgage, milk, bread and other necessaties have risen sharply. Ohh and i can assure you i had far more disposable income back then biggrin.gif
Alex MacPhee
I recall paying around 35p-40p for a pint of beer around 1977/8, the time we bought our first house. Calculating on historic RPI rates, that would be around 1.72 - 1.96 today.
john.mcn
A pint of beer would be in a pub, i cant compare like for like because the local pubs i drunk in shut down, but prices up the toon were around 1.80-2 while they're around 3ish now but should be over 4 going by inflation.
Supermarket pricing has driven down booze prices in real terms, almost everyone agrees . A 2l bottle of cider costs little more nowadays than it did when i spent my YTS wages over 20 years ago. A crate of Tennents was about 11 ish, in todays money that would be over 22 (Governments own inflation calculator) i would expect 2 or 3 crates for that in supermarket deals.
Jupiter
Alex my mate and I would walk from Queens Cross to the Scotia Bar with 10/-.That was four pints of Tennants lager and a long walk back up the road.
bilbo.s
It is hard to discuss this seriously, when posters give vague examples of dates and prices. Inflation calculators are available on many websites and is also possible to find average prices of items in any particular year. It would seem that, in general, drink prices have outstripped RPI inflation but, taken against wages, they have remained stable. Of course it all depends which span of years you use.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8120382...nt-of-beer.html

Interesting article by Prof. Ian Stewart (no relation)
Jupiter
bilbo, Have never taken anything too seriously here.I was talking about 68/69 and was making 7 a week.
I gave up Mortons rolls as the price became OTT.
bilbo.s
QUOTE (Jupiter @ 26th Mar 2012, 02:33pm) *
bilbo, Have never taken anything too seriously here.I was talking about 68/69 and was making 7 a week.



Were you 7 years old and cleaning lums ? Even I was making a lot more than that, and I was in the hotel industry, starting at 7pounds 7 shillings in 1962.
Jupiter
Benefits office,I lasted 6 months and got myself on the other side of the counter. rolleyes.gif
JAGZ1876
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 26th Mar 2012, 01:37pm) *
Were you 7 years old and cleaning lums ? Even I was making a lot more than that, and I was in the hotel industry, starting at 7pounds 7 shillings in 1962.



Your lucky bilbo,s, i started off at 5 per week as an apprentice in August 1972.
A Mackinnon
I have an old pay slip from when I was a 5th year apprentice Shipwright back in 1969, here is the info, some of which I don't even know now what it means!!!

Date; 14 Feb 69..............Hours, 47.30..................Wage, 17.19.11..........Bonus, 6.19.4

Working Allce. .09.0...........R.O.W.P, 2.07.6..........Holiday Credit, .16.2.........

Gross this Week, 28.11.11

Deductions; Grad Pension, .09.7............Tax Th.Week, 6.11.0.........

Nat Ins. 16.8........Inf.Fund .00.2.........Ded.for Hol.Cr, 16.2.........Net Pay, 19.18.4......Tool Allc, 0.2.0

Total Amount Payable, 21.05.4

Alex MacPhee
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 26th Mar 2012, 02:25pm) *
It is hard to discuss this seriously, when posters give vague examples of dates and prices. Inflation calculators are available on many websites

I use the Bank of England inflation calculator, in the main. My price recollections are fairly good, I think, as are the dates, since I can associate them with particular stages in my life. For example, I first discovered Guinness when I was working in a laboratory in Glasgow, between 1972 and 1973. I would go to The Griffin Bar, just across from the King's Theatre, on Friday lunchtimes. Guinness was relatively expensive, and when a pint of Tennent's was around 14p (up from 11p a pint at The Norseman, as used to be, diagonally opposite on Sauchiehall Street), a pint of Guinness at The Griffin was a whopping 19p. According to the Bank of England calculator, that would now cost me 2.06 a pint today. The 19p wasn't bad value, since at the time in The Griffin, plates of ham and cheese sandwiches were put on the bar, and if you bought a pint, the sandwiches were free.

In the mid sixties, there used to be an advert on TV for Castella cigars, which ran, "Have a Castella with your drink tonight ... for the price of a pint." The price was 1/6d. Supposing that to be in 1965 (since I was at school then and too young to drink, legally anyway), then according to the BofE calculator, that Castella, or that pint, would cost me 1.19 today.
Alex MacPhee
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 26th Mar 2012, 02:37pm) *
I was in the hotel industry, starting at 7pounds 7 shillings in 1962.

In 1968 I was working in the Grand Hotel, Charing Cross, Glasgow, as Second Porter, and getting 10 a week. Not to mention ripped off by the Head Porter and Head Waiter when the accumulated service charges were divvied up, and for a three month period, we got a scabby 10/-. The Head Porter and Waiter were creaming off most of it for themselves. (That's why, ever since then, I always pay the service charge in a restaurant in cash, not plastic.)
benny
I think Alex's price for a pint must be at least roughly correct. I didn't start drinking until I was 23 - in 1971 - and the first pint of heavy I ever bought cost me 16p. That was in Balloch, right enough, so I don't know if it equated well with pubs in the toon.

Jupiter
Benny what was your nourishment before you took to the drink? 23 you were a late starter. rolleyes.gif
dunstoshious
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 26th Mar 2012, 01:37pm) *
Were you 7 years old and cleaning lums ? Even I was making a lot more than that, and I was in the hotel industry, starting at 7pounds 7 shillings in 1962.

Paisley Mills 1967 - 25 to 30 quid per week night shift; largely unskilled after 6 weeks training. Had one chef working alongside who was sick of restaurant hours and pay.
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