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GG
Research by one of the country's leading teaching unions has revealed that Glasgow schools are the worst in Britain when it comes to ensuring that children leave with any qualifications. The survey, by the University and College Union (UCU), shows a clear educational gulf across the UK, with Glasgow firmly rooted at the bottom of educational attainment levels.

Worst in the British league table was the Glasgow North East constituency where a staggering 35% of adults have no qualifications at all. Other constituencies joining the Springburn-centred constituency in the 'top 10' of the educational roll of shame included Glasgow East (4th worst) and Glasgow South West (8th worst).

Speaking about the figures, Sally Hunt, the UCU's general secretary said:
QUOTE
"There is a clear Glasgow-Edinburgh divide in Scotland. One city with education and the massive personal benefits it can bring, and the other without.

Education is central to our country's future, yet in some areas thousands of people still have no qualifications. There is a real danger that children, growing up in places where it is not unheard of to have no qualifications, will have their ambition blunted and never realise their full potential."

A Glasgow City Council spokeswoman responded:
QUOTE
"We will continue to work to ensure every young person leaves school with the skills and confidence to equip them for later life. The council is committed to improve the life chances of every young person in our schools.

Glasgow has been leading the way in a range of qualifications, matching the individual needs of the pupil, and youngsters have been very successful in gaining vocational qualifications in partnership with our colleges."

Click to view attachment

Tell us about your experiences of Glasgow schools - were they the best days or your life, or do you regret that they did not help you reach your full potential?

GG.
murphy
I went to Wellshot School in Tollcross, Glasgow East End, as I have caught up with classmates they have good jobs and are all over the world, maybe the system has changed over the years, but dont you think school is what children put into their learning experiences. I think the parents need to be more involved in their childrens' schooling. I certainly learned a lot and it has stood me in great stead, God bless the Miss Chisholms, Mary and Jean.
terry
An interesting topic to be sure. i went to saint gerards in govan for 4 1/2 years leaving half way through the 5th year. sad to say i experienced utter boredom for most of those years. and my lot was not too unusual because most of those who had started off with me in year 1 were gone well before my departure. pity. as it turned out i picked up on my education when i came to america and eventually ended my career as a professor in my adopted country.
tr
tarheels
Both of you spoke very clearly about your schooling, i think what a young person puts into his or her school work is what they will gain in life , in ferndale michigan usa , the school i attended didn't give me what i needed in life , it was after that i earned my engineers degree in the army , but i don't think what a school teaches is going to make us great , its what you do afterwards that makes the differants, i am 74 years young , an still learning , God Bless the Teachers, they can only do what they do best , TEACH , READING , MATH., THE FUNDIMENTALS OF SCHOOLING
clarence potter sr or tarheels, or reilly on the net
my 2 cents worth
rumcdonald
This is so sad! Who are the pupils in Glasgow schools now?? Who are their parents? What is their upbringing? I went to two public junior schools in Glasgow..Holmlea Rd school in Holmlea Rd Cathcart and Victoria school in Govanhill Glasgow...then Queen's Park Senior Sec School. Had a great education!!! What is going on now?????
John the Jaw
I went to Albert Secondary in Springburn, leaving in '76, and was one of the guys who went through the motions of going to school not achieving many certificates, 2 o'levels. It has taken years to understand that there were some kids that the teachers give up on because they are so overwhelmed by the system. 35 in a class at the time wasn't unheard off.

With schools now having up to 36 different languages it is no wonder the education system is failing the poorer parts of the country.

crunchiebags
Rumcdonald asks whats going on now in our schools. I would answer possibly the modern equivalent of what I experienced in my secondary school in the late sixties early seventies. We were taught by a gang of old dinosaurs, who wore billowing black cloaks and who's battle cry was "keep to the left" and "boys stairs for boys and girls stairs for girls". It used to be a senior secondary but those days had long gone, a fact which the incumbent staff seemed to be unaware of. We had a very old Maths teacher who smelled of urine and used inappropriate behaviour towards the female students. An English teacher who, if not already pissed, would leave the class and have a snort in the adjacent store room, (sometimes forgetting to come back). There were, of course, young teachers coming through the ranks but I think they felt as helpless as the pupils. Half of these older guys should have been retired early to prevent the embarassment they brought on themselves personally and the school in general.
GG
Herald columnist Ian Bell on this subject:
QUOTE
It counts as another of those distinctions a great city could do without ... in terms of education, Glasgow is a catastrophe.

There is no other useful word, but nor is there a useful explanation. Governments come and go. Wave after wave of reforms are enacted. Brave promises are made, generation after generation. And in 2011 the Glasgow North East constituency achieves the worst educational rating in the entire United Kingdom. Of its children, 35.3% have left school – have been allowed to leave school – with not a single qualification.

This is not just a matter of abstruse, difficult subjects, or even of those courses which are, in legend, “dumbed down” or “too easy”. UCU is saying that in north-east Glasgow 35.3% are functionally illiterate, certainly innumerate, and as ignorant of the world – of how the world works – as visitors from another, barren planet. By this measure, even the notion of vocational education is a joke.

You could console yourself, or find a feeble excuse, in the idea that a single constituency is uniquely afflicted. That won’t do. The UCU further reports that every last part of Glasgow is below the UK average for attainment in exams, while every Edinburgh constituency sits in the top third. As a native of the capital, even I’m surprised. The conclusion is not that Edinburgh is entitled to boast – not by a long chalk – but that Glasgow’s crisis is profound. ...

Full comment article here:
http://www.heraldscotland.com/mobile/comme...ilure-1.1113607

GG.
GG
Posted by Agnes McManus via the 'report' button:
QUOTE
My nephew asked me to check over his homework, an essay which he was to hand in the following the following day. When I pointed out his spelling mistakes he told me that because we all use computers now, spelling is not important because we have a spell check which corrects your mistakes.

Lookin through his book I found the teacher totally ignored spelling mistakes. Not the way forward I think!

GG.
Melody
And they try to tell us that there is no direct correlation between poverty and educational success. dry.gif
Norman G
Another feather in the cap of the Labour administration.
But never mind, just vote them in again.
*jacmac471*
I was saddened to read this.

I attended Finnieston school , left in 1962, was sorry to leave ,because the teachers really cared for us ,and taught us well. I did not leave with any qualifications as such, but passed all my examinations.

They also instilled a sense of discipline and common decency ,which I feel is lacking in some quarters today ,and of course this should start in the home.

I went on to further my qualifications (electrical) at night school, and colleges through the years and, have travelled and worked around the world in an electrical consultancy capacity.

A lot can be achieved with hard work and determination.

Regards, John Mccabe Msc Miee Cibse Iosh.
*greta*
I have to say they were the best days of my life, although I didnt know it at the time. Speaking from personal experience I went to Barmulloch primary before my family decided (due to my fathers new job) to move south. When I got to my new school (in a rural area) it was discovered that my level of education was above that of the new school and I was moved up a primary. It may be different now I dont know but thats my experience of that time.
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE
... When I pointed out his spelling mistakes he told me that because we all use computers now, spelling is not important because we have a spell check which corrects your mistakes.

Mmmm ... and what spell check does the spell check have?
That and "Txting" might have a lot to answer for.

I once attended an evening class; over here, to help me learn German. There were about 20 or more in the class and all of different nationalities including Chinese. The class could only advance as fast as the slowest student. Seeing that right away, I quit.

As a kid in school just outside Glasgow, lagging behind was discouraged. Pupils were pushed on to keep up with the rest of the class.
Maybe that's what went wrong.
British Power
Like Terry, I too went to St Gerard's S.S. School and, regrettably, did not fare too well there. However, that had very little to do with the School, the System or the Teachers, it was down to myself. Retrospectively, there is no doubt that the opportunities were there, in abundance, as many others went on to prove - this was purely a personal problem and difficulties I happened to be going through at that stage in my life.

I think that the schools do as good a job as can be expected of them given the myriad of changes, not all for the best, that have taken place within the education system over the last 30-40 years. It is not the schools nor teaching staff that gives me any cause for concern in the present times, it is the attitude of the public in general and certain parents in particular, some of which is deplorable and has a deleterious impact on their children if they could but take a step back and look at what they are doing.

Small wonder that teachers leave the profession early or embark on long-term sick leave with depression and/or stress disorders.

Oh, yes, and the various Governments have not exactly covered themselves in glory where the education system is concerned - they are the root and branch cause of much many of the present-day problems.

As someone who made a spectacular hash of his own education, perhaps I have a bit of a cheek articulating in the manner I have done. However, I put five children through Universities after their normal schooling and have therefore had first hand experience over the last 25 years of the education system and believe it is in reasonable shape overall - I think ! smile.gif
Hank Green
My schooldays in Glasgow ended in 1939 and they were happy and rewarding. I left Shawlands Academy and planned to continue to post-secondary education but the start of WW2 helped to change my plans. I went to work at the Glasgow Herald and in 1942 I entered the Royal Navy. On my discharge I entered Glasgow University and on graduation I emigrated to Canada. In Canada after one year I returned to studies and made a career in academia. I have always upheld the Glasgow School System. I married a Canadian sweetheart and have raised a Canadian family but I have never forgot the happiness of my early schooling.
*alybainfan*
I attended Knightswood Senior Secondary as it was then.. in the late 60's, and I have to say even back then Teachers concentrated almost wholly on the smarter cleverer pupils and pretty much left the rest of us get on with by ourselves.

I don't believe this is a new phenomenon unfortunately.
amclpreston
QUOTE (murphy @ 15th Sep 2011, 02:34am) *
I went to Wellshot School in Tollcross, Glasgow East End, as I have caught up with classmates they have good jobs and are all over the world, maybe the system has changed over the years, but dont you think school is what children put into their learning experiences. I think the parents need to be more involved in their childrens' schooling. I certainly learned a lot and it has stood me in great stead, God bless the Miss Chisholms, Mary and Jean.

Wellshot Road School was my first school, in 1957/58. My father worked as a gardener in Tollcross Park, and we lived in a flat in the park Mansion House.

I don't remember too much. What I do recall is feeling really lonely in the playground, lots of latch-key kids, and also the day I dropped my pencil in class. It rolled away, I told the teacher, she said that if I couldn't find it, and she had to lend me one, she would belt me. I can'r recall whether she did belt me, or whether she didn't, or whether I've just blanked it out.

Place to get out of, imo .

My father later became a teacher, and as he improved his career, the family moved every few years. First Milngavie, then Stranraer both primary and High School.

Far too easy to get beltings and thrashings in Scottish schools, in my opinion. And the belting, or threats of belting on 5 year olds, was beyond the pale.
Scotsman
I went to Strathbungo Senior Secondary School for a while and I found that the level of teaching was a decent standard for most of the time but I kind of lost interest.... maybe the tachers could have done more??

I think the standard of education in Glasgow schools today is appalling compared to what it was when there was a system of senior secondaries who taught the brightest and best pupils. I think the teachers in todays comprehensive schools in Glasgow are just serving their time until they can get a job outside of the city or until they retire. A very poor standard indeed but do we ever hear politicians complaining.... let alone acting to make things better for our children??
Southside jim
I attended Victoria primary in govanhill as well as copeland primary in govan. Both were really well run schools,and the teachers really helped you.

Then it was onto queen's park secondary ! Some of the staff didn't really bother as long as you held in your homework on time, and didn't disrupt the class. They were ok with what you did.

Now my sons schools years are totally different !! They attended victoria primary for 3yrs before moving to cuthbertson primary. And the teaching in both schools are terrible !

Is it the teachers or the way the government try and focus on various PC related issue's !

My son's were tested for dyslexia ! Tests went on for yrs only to find out that the school board were'nt quailified ion testing for this 1 So 3-5yrs wasted doing tests all over again ! Our youngest sons was bullied by a teacher in P1 !!! As she didn't really like dealing with young kids !!! Why be a teacher then !!

Our youngest sons' confidence was broken until he got a new teacher in P2. She was brilliant with him, and did everything she could to push him along and encourage him with his work !

Teachers have to go over and over the same things daily now, because of the infux of immigrants attending schools, who don't understand the basic english lanuage !! So class work sufferes for other pupils ! Then you have those who don't bother doing any type of school work ! And they disrupt the class !

Then you have head-teachers who it seems want one of those old-badges that McDonalds staff used to wear ! For customer service !! They will do everything they can to make surethe governments policy on immirants students meets the targets at the expense of the local children !!

If parents are not teaching their kids basic english at home ! Then what chance do the teachers have, when they have to keep teaching the basics every day for those who are not intrested !!

Now our twin sons are at shawlands academy. And things seem ok so-far ! A few things we've had to keep asking about ! But will see how the implement their dyslexia program later in the year. And if we feel its not working we will soon let them know !!
mlconnelly
I cant make up my mind which way to vote on this 1. I attended both St Augustine's Primary and secondary schools in Milton and I left in 1976 with no qualifications but that never held me back as I got a job almost right away and was in employment constantly up until 3 years ago. At that time we were told that the Scottish Education system was 2nd to none in the world, and I believe at the time it was, so what happened? The powers that be, in their infinite wisdom, decided to change how things were done and in turn ruined it. What happened to "If its not broke, don't fix it". As I dont have children of my own I dont feel able to judge whether its the education system thats letting our kids down or somethings else. What I do know is that at age 7 I could read fairly well but at age 9 my god-daughter struggles to read a complete sentence without making mistakes and my 7 year old nephew can barely read at all. Mary
LizzieLou
I was born and brought up in Glasgow and was always very proud of my schooling. I'm now a working pensioner and still proud. In my days a Scottish Education was deemed to be the best in the world and for many it still is, myself included. At least when we were young we learned the three "R's" nowadays so many of the youngsters can't read, write or do even simple arithmetic, technology is a wonderful thing but the basics must take priority. Our classes were often very overcrowded but all it did was give us determination to succeed, that determination has sadly gone for many of today's children. There is more funding than ever available for schooling but it doesn't always fall in the right places. An example of this is, teaching English as a first language to residents who should already be speaking the language of the country they live in. I rest my case Lizziellou.
angel
I was one of the very fortunate children who attended school when
Scotland had a decent education system.
When I was in primary school , it was very important to me to learn how to read , even at that young age I realized that reading was knowledge
so when I would get home from school my father would spend time teaching me how to read the newspapers and next day our teacher would let me read whatever topic I had read , too the class .
Those teachers took an interest in their pupils , but I think in most cases
for today's teachers their profession is simply a job with a pay cheque .
wee davy
I've just read this thread.

Have to say I'm not only shocked but dreadfully disappointed in the conclusions this Union report came to.

Tony said 'Education, Education, Education'. My, how those words should be resounding in his head.

Clearly, too much tinkering - too much theorising - about what is needed or not needed - has not done Glasgow, an OUNCE of good. Sadly, I have to say (and make an assuption) that those tasked with ensuring youngsters get a good start in life - have failed them miserably. sad.gif
okiegal
I was born & raised in Glasgow & attended the best schools in the world. I attended Saint Aloysius in Renton St. then I went on to Garnethill Convent of Mercy & I believe my education was second to none. We had great respect for our teachers as they did expect this from us but they also respected us. I came to the USA in 1961 & my husband, kids & grandkids are Americans & wonderful people but I am still the same wee lassie fae "GLESGA" & I wouldn't trade my raising in "GLESGA" with anyone else in the world.
Bob McDougall
@wee davy

I have to agree with you, especially having just read the story on the BBC website, Glasgow, Liverpool, Nottingham top jobless households, that Glasgow is one of only three UK cities where more than 30% of homes have no-one working in them.

Saying that the Glasgow city fathers have failed miserably is an understatement!

Bob McDougall.
*lizzielou*
QUOTE (wee davy @ 15th Sep 2011, 04:45pm) *
I've just read this thread.

Have to say I'm not only shocked but dreadfully disappointed in the conclusions this Union report came to.

Tony said 'Education, Education, Education'. My, how those words should be resounding in his head.

Clearly, too much tinkering - too much theorising - about what is needed or not needed - has not done Glasgow, an OUNCE of good. Sadly, I have to say (and make an assuption) that those tasked with ensuring youngsters get a good start in life - have failed them miserably. sad.gif

Very much agree with you there.
huffydoll
Well, I must say that we get what we vote for in this city. Year after year, generation after generation, and the talent our youth is wasted in schools that are quite obviously not fit for purpose.
frame
Easter 1960 marked the end of my school days. I was all of 15 years old when I walked out of St Bernard's schoolyard gates for the last time. I was travelling light academically but that was down to me not the people employed to teach me, they did their best.
I'm ashamed to say that I had no interest in education or what the benefits of it might bring.
Walking through those gates was a kind of freedom and I believed then the only way for me was up.
Thankfully I discovered and very soon the error that I had made. The most important years of my life just tossed away through laziness, idleness and a complete disregard for learning. I started reading everything that came my way, anything I could get my hands on no matter what, I read it.
I took further education on the basics and moved on from there. I could actually feel energy flowing through me and at times couldn't believe how good I felt about myself. The years passed and I met and married, would you believe, a maths teacher.
We raised a family of three, a girl and two boys.
I know for certain that when they walked through their schoolyard gates for the last time, the only way was unquestionably up.
lew dick
One point that han't been brought up. The authority of the teachers has been taken away. Back when I went to school, when the teacher told you to do homework, it was done without question. Today, it seems as if the pupils have too much say , in what goes on in the classroom. Teachers can't discipline those who don't apply themseves and the rest of the class gets held back waiting for them to catch up. I don't think it is the teachers at fault. I think it is the modern thinking of teenagers today.
RobBob
Well I guess you could say my worst day was the one when the teacher told me I had to carry his bagpipes as he played his instrument and when I objected he told me to go down to the cafeteria and fill up on Haggis. Wow, talk about oatmeal for breakfast. Then there was the shortbread cookies, not that was a thing that truly identified my love of Scotland. Unfortunately, I have never been to school in Glasgow, nevermind ever been to Scotland but you can be assured that if I had gone to school in Glasgow whatever one I was in was the worst one in the city.....
ceader bhoy
QUOTE (mlconnelly @ 15th Sep 2011, 03:38pm) *
I cant make up my mind which way to vote on this 1. I attended both St Augustine's Primary and secondary schools in Milton and I left in 1976 with no qualifications but that never held me back as I got a job almost right away and was in employment constantly up until 3 years ago. At that time we were told that the Scottish Education system was 2Nd to none in the world, and I believe at the time it was, so what happened? The powers that be, in their infinite wisdom, decided to change how things were done and in turn ruined it. What happened to "If its not broke, don't fix it". As I don't have children of my own I don't feel able to judge whether its the education system thats letting our kids down or somethings else. What I do know is that at age 7 I could read fairly well but at age 9 my god-daughter struggles to read a complete sentence without making mistakes and my 7 year old nephew can barely read at all. Mary

Mary they did not want us to learn as they were taught to keep us down, this is the same with the conservatives, i never learned a thing at school because the school teachers thought we were scum we got the belt for nothing as they were sadistic bastards from the old school they went to maybe fee paying schools don't know on my high horse at this moment love you cousin x
lord anthony
Demand excelence!
ceader bhoy
QUOTE (lord anthony @ 16th Sep 2011, 01:04am) *
Demand excelence!

you'r a little lord fouterloy ??
DannyH
QUOTE (terry @ 15th Sep 2011, 03:54am) *
An interesting topic to be sure. i went to saint gerards in govan for 4 1/2 years leaving half way through the 5th year. sad to say i experienced utter boredom for most of those years. and my lot was not too unusual because most of those who had started off with me in year 1 were gone well before my departure. pity. as it turned out i picked up on my education when i came to america and eventually ended my career as a professor in my adopted country.
tr

I hate to sound sarcastic, but even though you are now a professor, you still wouldn't pass your English exam if you were attending a Glasgow school today. You have used 'i' instead of 'I' four times. You have started one sentence with the word 'sad'. It should be 'Sad'. You have also started another sentence with the word 'pity'. It should be 'Pity'. I was also taught in a Glasgow school that 'america' should be 'America'.

I am sure that you will agree that you have adopted the modern way of communication, i.e texting. This could be a contributing factor in why many school children are failing in English at schools.

Regards

DannyH
ceader bhoy
QUOTE (DannyH @ 16th Sep 2011, 01:15am) *
I hate to sound sarcastic, but even though you are now a professor, you still wouldn't pass your English exam if you were attending a Glasgow school today. You have used 'i' instead of 'I' four times. You have started one sentence with the word 'sad'. It should be 'Sad'. You have also started another sentence with the word 'pity'. It should be 'Pity'. I was also taught in a Glasgow school that 'america' should be 'America'.

I am sure that you will agree that you have adopted the modern way of communication, i.e texting. This could be a contributing factor in why many school children are failing in English at schools.

Regards

DannyH

did you go to st columba's ??? know all
DannyH
I started primary school in Glasgow in 1936 when I was five. I attended Oakbank School in Garscube Road. We were all working class children. My memories of my time there are all happy ones.

I was evacuated to Canada in 1940 and attended a primary school there. In Canada at that time the starting age for school was six, so I had a head start and I was off to a flyer. Looking back now, I can say with confidence that the primary education I received in Oakbank School, was first class. Then, as now, if your parents took an interest in your education you had an advantage over those children whose parents had no interest.

The education I received in Canada was also of a high standard and I have many happy memories of my time there. However when I came home, I was placed in a junior secondary school because I was to old at thirteen to sit the 'qualy' exam. At this school I noticed a dramatic difference in the attitude of a small number of male teachers, compared to my primary schools teachers. Some of these seconday school teachers resorted to using the belt on pupils who were not grasping what was being taught. For some reason these teachers thought the slower pupils were being insolent and so deserved the belt. The fact was that these teachers were the failures. They were taking out their frustrations on some of the pupils because they themselves couldn't get a teaching post in a senior secondary school.

In spite of this, many of the boys who left school at 14 or 15 in those days, went on to do very well in life. I have met up with a few of them, and I am very proud of them.

Regarding modern schooling, I recently came across some exam papers for arithmetic and mathematics. I was shocked at how low a standard they were compared to the ones I took way back in the 1940's. I would like to see the Glasgow Guide asking employers what they think about modern education.

I also think in fairness to teachers nowadays, that they have much more to contend with than teachers of many years ago. It is a different world.
DannyH
QUOTE (ceader bhoy @ 16th Sep 2011, 01:32am) *
did you go to st columba's ??? know all

No, but you did.

Regards

Danny Harris
mlconnelly
My sister was a secondary school teacher (head of language department) but she took early retirement this year as she was completely disillusioned with the way the education system has change over the years. She became a teacher because she wanted to teach but was spending more and more time dealing with paper work, redtape and a higherarchy who didn't care or have a clue as long as they looked good on paper.
John, you obviously didn't have a great experience at school and your right that teachers then probably concentrated on the brighter kids to the detriment of the others but now that seems to have swung in the opposite direction and the brighter kids are being held back. When I was at St Augustines our classes were graded according to ability but again the powers that be decided that this wasn't fair to the pupils in the lower classes as they were being made to feel inferior. At the time I agrred but not so sure now. Mary
norrie123
I started school 1950 Elmvale school Springburn, then to Miltonbank Milton and finally a junior secondary school Colston, I can say I disliked school never took time off unless unwell
Of course even then we had bullies but you had to stand up to them
I dont feel the school failed me.
I was trained for trades, woodwork ,metal work, techie drawing, guess thats why I went into engineering
All in all, guess school set me up
Bye for now, norrie
patsy113
I attended school in Townhead St. Mungo`s Infants on to Glebe St. Primary the St. Roch`s Royston Rd.all between 1944thru.to55 I broke my heart the day i left,also i had the best teachers that my
Parents could ask to educate their children and they had no worries of our safety and health.
When i left school i had no Certs it made no difference i got into Broad St.pre school for Plumbing&
and Pipe Fitting and the rest is history 72 yrs. no regrets.
TeeHeeHee
Click to view attachment

Click to view attachment

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/271583

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-20...wing-riots.html

This new broom sweeps clean. biggrin.gif

QUOTE
In the first three days of this term alone, he sent home 151 pupils for wearing trainers with Velcro, the wrong trousers, an unsuitable school bag and, in one case, a gold hairband.

Scores more were sent to after-school detention for failing to bring a pencil, paper, rubber and ruler with them to class, while dozens were put in an isolation centre for disrupting lessons.

Just 48 hours after the iron rules were introduced, teachers reported they had doubled the amount of teaching time in lessons, as they no longer had to perform ‘crowd control’.

While a handful of parents have attacked Dr Fox’s draconian measures, branding them ‘ridiculous’, there has been a groundswell of support from many grateful parents who are desperate for their children to learn in school.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-20...l#ixzz1Y7AkYaLi

Is this perhaps the answer, or at least a part of the answer?
I was never an unruly kid in school although I was quite often belted for being a bit of a chatterbox ... Who? Me, miss? rolleyes.gif but I do know that without the support of the strap our teachers might have had little or no control over classes. Getting the belt for forgetting to return homework was an accepted punishment; by both pupils and parents, although being strapped for making a mistake in calculation or spelling might have seemed unjust but it certainly was an aid in paying attention ... and that is where I think things might have started to go wrong in schools.
When I read recently of some of the subject courses taken by school children which produced multi GCES and girls opting for hairdressing and not being allowed to use scissors during this course because of 'elf 'n safety regulations, I wondered which planet I was on ... remember all those wee scissors we used to cut paper with in infant school?
TeeHeeHee
Memory has just been refreshed. tongue.gif

From my Man Management course in the RAF ...

QUOTE
The 3 rules of discipline are:-

1. Keep rules to a minimum
2. Never make a rule that you cannot enforce
3. The rules you do make you enforce with a rod of iron.
These rules work for commanding men, training dogs and bringing up kids.


biggrin.gif
Dave Grieve
QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 16th Sep 2011, 02:11pm) *
Memory has just been refreshed. tongue.gif

From my Man Management course in the RAF ... biggrin.gif

Dont you know Tomi that they would scream blue murder if those rules where imposed on them not to mention its an infringement of their shuman rites.

Could blue murder be construed as a sectarian crime? rolleyes.gif
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (Dave Grieve @ 16th Sep 2011, 01:57pm) *
Could blue murder be construed as a sectarian crime? rolleyes.gif

laugh.gif I'll have to check that out with ma sister laugh.gif
Dylan
John aged 7 hits James age 7 in the playground.

Teacher hits James to teach him that hitting John was bad.

John now wonders why it was ok for Teacher to hit him, if it was wrong for him to hit James.

Teacher tells him that it is ok to hit someone who hits someone.

John is confused.!
*Catherine*
I went to one of the first comprehensive schools in the UK in the 1950's, ie Crookston Castle, which sadly no longer exists. We had some of the best teachers anywhere and although I was miffed at not going to Shawlands Academy like my older brother, looking back I don't think it did me any harm.
wee davy
QUOTE (Dylan @ 16th Sep 2011, 03:58pm) *
John aged 7 hits James age 7 in the playground.
Teacher hits James to teach him that hitting John was bad.
John now wonders why it was ok for Teacher to hit him, if it was wrong for him to hit James.

Teacher tells him that it is ok to hit someone who hits someone.

John is confused.!

2011

John aged 7 kicks James age 7 in the head, as a Teacher stands by, powerless.

James finishes up with brain damage.

John is sent for therapy.

Who's confused now?
bilbo.s
Well said, wee man ! smile.gif
lord anthony
QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 16th Sep 2011, 08:11am) *
Memory has just been refreshed. tongue.gif

From my Man Management course in the RAF ...



biggrin.gif

This is why women have ALL the power. Men are always trying to wrestle or bully each other with rules while women control and manipulate them. Look at the matriarchy of Roman empire, lasted centuries.

If things are getting better it's because we're slowly figuring out how to work together, not by men "enforcing" bloody rules.
My formative years were miserable because of rules.
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