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ashfield
In a Terry Pratchett film shown on BBC3 earlier this week, dealing with the subject of assisted suicide, the death of a man was filmed. I have my own views on the subject of assisted suicide but it was this aspect of the film I felt uncomfortable with. It did not seem to me necessary to further inform the debate and in the end I decided not to watch the film.

There has been some debate within the media since it was aired, one argument given by a supporter was that we show births so why not death. My feeling is that, generally, birth is a joyous occasion whilst death, generally, is not.

Should it have been shown?
wee davy
QUOTE
friends have told The Daily Telegraph of his determination to help change the law

I not only think your right to ask the question - but to open up the debate.

Was it right for the death scene to have been shown?
In my opinion, most definitely.
Why? Because on so many levels, it was the whole POINT of the documentary

Documentaries are often heavily edited, to avoid 'warts & all' events.

In this case, it was important - not because it made 'good TV' - but because if nothing else it makes ALL self righteous individuals sit up and take notice.

Finally it was right because I believe Peter Smedley and others like him have the right to choose a dignified death (not SUICIDE) - and in the end - although clean and a seemingly painless one - this was not entirely so - because he wasn't allowed this final palliative act, to take place 'at home

There ARE other issues surrounding this whole subject - but in the Smedley case, I'm sure many people will relate to the predicament he found himself in

The other case however - was DEFINITELY suicide (IMO). I personally do not believe the 42 year old was of sufficiently sound mind (having attempted to take his own life twice before). He should have been rejected.

I think the two things are NOT the same - assisted DYING for compassionate reasons - is just that - assisted suicide is a WHOLE different ball game.

Lets face it - NONE of us want our loved ones to SUFFER at the end - or even towards the end.
TeeHeeHee
It's a delicate enough subject and although the idea of watchin' a fly-on-the-wall-euthanasia film could be likened a bit to watchin' a snuff movie, I would have watched had it been shown here; on the borders with Switzerland where it's in practice.
I've always wanted to hit 100/120 in years; after I survived into the new millenium and thought Mmmm! ... all things being equal. rolleyes.gif
Many moons ago I was told by a freindly palm reader that I might just reach that target but the end would be agony.; yeah, fair enuff rolleyes.gif
But when some freindly sawbones finally gets round tae tellin' me I really have reached the end of the road; this time, then just spare me the agony. wink.gif
wee davy
The Paxman Newsnight discussion afterwards, was brilliant, THEE.
Very balanced, and even had the Dignitas 'doctor death' on there! (Wouldn't like to meet her on a dark night lol)
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (wee davy @ 15th Jun 2011, 11:47am) *
The other case however - was DEFINITELY suicide (IMO). I personally do not believe the 42 year old was of sufficiently sound mind (having attempted to take his own life twice before). He should have been rejected.

I think the two things are NOT the same - assisted DYING for compassionate reasons - is just that - assisted suicide is a WHOLE different ball game.

Davy, when I was in RAF Chessington Joint Services Rehabilitation Unit, the only civilian patient was an attempted suicide case ... a 3rd attempted suicide actually.
When I met him he was moving toward me in a wheelchair, in a corridor, singin' "What a Wonderful World". He had no legs, worth mentionin', and mechanical linkages for arms.
Always on the scrounge for our tablets.
That was his 3rd attempt. Threw himself in front of a train and survived ... limbless.
Naturally none of us gave him our own medication; that would get traced back, but we should have ... he was serious and should have been helped to finish it.
mlconnelly
I'm all for euthanasia and cant understand why it cant be legalised globally never mind just in Uk. When its my turn to go, I would like to think I could go with some measure of dignity. I would hate to have an illness that had me trapped in a body that didn't work or would cause me to have a long painful death. We live in a society where we wouldn't let a animal suffer, but it seems to be ok to let people suffer
I know there are some people who think any form of assissted death could be open to abuse but everything is to some degree. Mary
ashfield
Davy, I agree that the debate needs to happen. I understand that Margo MacDonald, Indepenent MSP, intends to reintroduce her "right to die" bill to the Scottish parliament. With the right safeguards, I would support her bill. It seems ludicrous to me that those denied the right here can travel to another Country to achieve their aim. Would it not be sensible to have our own legislature setting the ground rules?

I remain unconvinced about why Pratchett felt the need to show this man dying. Most people will have experienced death at first hand, will understand the emotion surrounding it and in particular the finality it brings. His film about the right to choose death, in my opinion, would have been persuasive enough without those scenes being included.
angel
Joy and sadness is part of life as is birth and death,
so I don;t see a problem showing death , no matter
which form it may take.




proudmaryhiller
I watched this programme and to be honest I did not find anything dignified about it, I found it quite harrowing. I kept wishing that Terry would have gone over and put his arms around that poor woman, it was just horrible, I felt quite down for a while after watching it.

We all hope for a peaceful/pain free ending, but I would never want to down a lethal cocktail of drugs while awake, all I can say is he was a very brave man and I felt so sad for him and the other younger man with MS.
Dunvegan
This debate on the right to die, die with dignity is a very emotive subject and one where no clean lines can be drawn. Manic depression can lead to suicide and in many cases requests to be "put down" Yes very emotive words but in this case ????. Taking into account a patients physical health affecting their mental health and subsequently judgment is a difficult basis from where to give approval for voluntary removal from this world. As for the question of ethics why should, and this question that arose in Australia one one occasion, a Christian enforced ethos be foisted on me as a Buddhist. Those calling for natural death in the face of prolonged agonizing debility have little right to interfere in what is often an medically induced, and unnatural in years past, retention of a life that has little or no meaning to the sufferer.
Chrissie
Always believed in being able to choose a way out of an incurable situation. Must admit now that I'm older I hope they don't use that as an excuse to bump us oldsters off to save a few pennies. ohmy.gif

Dunvegan, I saw this on another board. We don't all have a wall full of diplomas. What does the term auto erotic mean? rolleyes.gif
Dunvegan
QUOTE (Chrissie @ 16th Jun 2011, 03:17pm) *
Always believed in being able to choose a way out of an incurable situation. Must admit now that I'm older I hope they don't use that as an excuse to bump us oldsters off to save a few pennies. ohmy.gif

Dunvegan, I saw this on another board. We don't all have a wall full of diplomas. What does the term auto erotic mean? rolleyes.gif

Sexually pleasuring ones self, but the holy father was using it metaphorically. (I hope!!!)
TeeHeeHee
And here's me thinkin' it meant you get a buzz in a Bentley tongue.gif
Chrissie
Dunvegan - Thanks for the info smile.gif
Dunvegan
QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 16th Jun 2011, 07:26pm) *
And here's me thinkin' it meant you get a buzz in a Bentley tongue.gif

Please try not to upset the ladies TH. mind you I've been in a Rolls (wasn't a wedding or a funeral) but never a Bently. biggrin.gif
benny
Two separate issues - whether assisted dying should be allowed, and whether someone's real-life death should be shown on telly. I don't have any hard and fast views on the first issue, but I don't think the death should have been shown on TV. I didn't watch it, and have no intention of ever watching it. As far as I'm concerned it's victim TV, just like all the inane chat shows with brain dead participants making a spectacle of themselves for the pleasure of a gloating audience.
wombat
rolleyes.gif dont haud back noo benny laugh.gif





Dunvegan
Worst form of voyeurism. Where's the dignity of dying for the entertainment of the brain dead and the dysfunctionals. "Reality T.V; very often the entertainment of humiliation, will plumb any depth for the corporate advertising dollar or the titillation of the couch warmers.
Crewsy Fixer
Is there any viewing figures for this. Whether its live on tv or not isnt really the issue. I have decided that if I am faced with a long slow painful death, then so be it, I will go through with it. It wont last forever.

If someone else would rather hasten the end by their own hand or with assistance then I can understand that and couldnt or wouldnt condemn it, but doing it live on tv to highlight the issue is immoral.
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