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GG
It sounded like a good idea: start an online campaign on a popular social networking site to save one of the UK's most popular music venues, The Barrowland. Cue thousands of angry music fans from all over the world posting heated condemnations of Glasgow City Council, in this, the very city which has just been crowned a Unesco City of Music.

One irate poster on the Facebook site, among many similar posters, claimed that "if Glasgow City Council are allowed to go through with this [the closure of The Barrowland], it will be an absolute travesty".

There was only one problem though: the Barrowland music venue is not – and never has been – under threat of closure by Glasgow City Council. In fact the council doesn't even own the popular venue!

Unfortunately the organisers of the online campaign mistook the famous ballroom for the equally famous Barras market, which is located downstairs from the gig venue. The confusion occurred after the Barras was subject to close attention by council officials, legitimate traders and Strathclyde Police, all of whom are eager to clean-up the market made famous by Margaret McIver, the barra's queen.

Sensitivities about any possible closure of The Barras are acute among a concerned Glasgow public following the closure of Paddy's Market in Shipbank Lane earlier this year.

Responding to the confusion, a Glasgow City Council spokesman said:
QUOTE
"The Barrowland is a legendary music venue, one that performers and audiences regularly refer to as one of the world's best. We look forward to the continued success of this Glasgow institution."

On the subject of its desire to clean up The Barras, the spokesman said:
QUOTE
"The Barras is a world-famous Glasgow institution, and an attraction that draws many people to the city. The city council would be very keen to ensure that this is the best Barras market it can possibly be, and would be interested in speaking to traders to explore any plans they may have for the development of The Barras."

Local MSP Frank McAveety added:
QUOTE
"The Barras is an essential part of Glasgow history and its people. I've had positive experiences there and many memories, and would want The Barras to return to that and be part of the wider East End regeneration. I'm very supportive of any efforts which would see legitimate traders taking greater ownership of the market and more responsibility for the negative aspects of it."

How to tell The Barrowland from The Barras:



The Barrowland: a nearly world-famous music venue.




The Barras: a (kind of) world-famous open-air market.

GG.
pumps100
I am even embarrassed at such a public gaff.

Ian
Catherine
All's well that ends well comes to mind Martin.

Cripes a mistake was made, aw soarted.....nae big deal at the end of the day.

Ian ye widnae dae well walkin a mile in ma shoes in a day if yer that easy embarrassed laugh.gif
GG
QUOTE (Catherine @ 20th Nov 2009, 12:35am) *
Cripes a mistake was made, aw soarted.....nae big deal at the end of the day.

Jeez Catherine, we're Glaswegians, and this the modern-day Steamie. Can we not at least have a wee session of 'tut-tut', "who's like us?" and "no in ma day!"??? laugh.gif

Ah... The Barras are Better!

GG.
Guest
Who's perfect. Who hasn't made a mistake? There's a lot more to worry about. There's our soldiers over in Afganistan? Who made the mistake of sending them there? Goverments are the worse for their screw ups.
Catherine
Aye right enuf Martin.....ahv jist had it this week wae who tae fight next type a thing laugh.gif

Ah say Hang the Alexandro Bastedo...who wis the doughball onyway that goat it wrang in the first place laugh.gif
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (GG @ 20th Nov 2009, 01:43am) *
... and this the modern-day Steamie.

rolleyes.gif biggrin.gif
bunch
love the barras
weebren3
rolleyes.gif glad we aw have the barra.s thing sorted out,and Barrowland still stands. good times there.
bilbo.s
Incidentally it gets right up my nose (plenty room there) when Barrowland is referred to as BarrowlandS. It happens all the time, especially in ads for gigs.
Kaneman
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 20th Nov 2009, 09:32am) *
Incidentally it gets right up my nose (plenty room there) when Barrowland is referred to as BarrowlandS. It happens all the time, especially in ads for gigs.

Talkin aboot that dae yeh still get the welks in a broon paper poke wi a wee pin laugh.gif Miss the Barras, remember ahn uncle had a stall there probably 40 years ago
wilstar@hotmail.co
The Barras are not only a retail outlet, antiques market, and sometimes reported dodgy dealings dive, but have other things to offer. Where can you find that old spanner, a bit of out of date machinery or kitchen appliance. You can see all types of people there. It is the home of the "Glaesga Banter" and the vendors trading their ares in the vocal diliberations to get you to part with your money are an excellent source of entertainment. Yes, you can still get those well known delicacies such as whilks and mussels. Alas, your wulks an mussells are now served in plastic bags or polystyrene cups, but you still get the pin to wheech oot the meat from the shell of your Wulk. I never miss getting my wulks an mussels every time I am in the vacinity of the Calton area at the weekends. yes the Barras have still a place in Glasgow for they are not only an institution but traditionally the gateway to the east end.
*greta*
I am very concerned to hear that the great barras are under threat. It was a big treat going there when I was a wee yin. Used to look forward to the weekend, not just for anything given like toys but for the smells frying and so on. Allas not the same as it used to be but still it has to be saved as one of Glasgows great institutions. Long may it continue.
*8ball345*
The council would't make so many crass blunders if they first consulted the people.Is that too much like old-fashioned common sense?
8ball
lynno1
glad it is sorted out as someone has already said aye the barras are better so glad as all my family were brought up in the calton kent st and still have family there. let glasgow flourish 4eva. all the best everyone cheers
*kathleen*
We McAleers have a long history with both the Barras and the Barrowland "Maw Kate " (my husband's granny) had the stall under the clocks where you could buy bedspreads and cushions. Her eldest son Joe McAleer was THE bouncer at the Barrowland and threw many a drunk down those steep stairs. Long before I met the family, I remember the Rolling Stones performed at the Barrowland while I was a wee Charlotte Street Girl in the early sixties. Can you still have your photo taken at the Barras in your best gear? Visited the Barras in 2007 while on holiday in Glasgow. Long may they continue as the icons they are !
Kathleen McAleer
Melbourne
Lennox
QUOTE (Kaneman @ 20th Nov 2009, 07:41am) *
Talkin aboot that dae yeh still get the welks in a broon paper poke wi a wee pin laugh.gif Miss the Barras, remember ahn uncle had a stall there probably 40 years ago

How can you foget them oh the smell, my granny loved them but no me. I still can remember the first time I went to the Barra's on my own wisny the same as going with my granny or granda huh.gif
petunia
Ah I remember it well, good times at Barrowland as for the barras you could find the real Glasgow people walking and joking around there and some good deals for what you could afford.
Professur
If not for the Barras, I'd never have enjoyed the Sarry Heid.

Although watching a guy stick a lit fag between the toes of a dozing drunk at Baird's was almost as much fun.
*peter.howden*
17 Lucky number; part (2)

Jim Hamilton and I wandered into most dance halls while we were very close friends though I would go further by stating we were best mates for around five years or so. Jim with his Buddy Holly broad rimmed glasses certainly cut a dash and was different from me in many aspects. He was studious ambitious, modest and very good looking, whilst I was blasť if not lazy and not so good looking but slightly more street wise and talkative The last was obvious and this type of partnership was common on the dating front. Most girls and boys hung around in sort of groups but paired with another to go of to a party or dance.

The idea was simply the good looking one would look much better if his china was “looks challenged”, or not nearly as pleasant to look at. This highlighted the profile of the handsome being. The ordinary one or sometimes the just plain ugly one, benefited by having a chance of catching the girls who hung about viewing the better on. This scam worked well for both sexes as most girls went to places with (me and my pal) that idea of safety and the boys saying “I don’t like the look of yours” (now politically incorrect). This may sound like being derogative towards the opposite sex but I would argue that it was a safety net for like today’s youth we were learning our way and giving the impression that we were and in the know.

Jim had this beaming smile, which would have put paid to Robert Redford and perhaps Burt Lancaster’s; as they were only on the silver screen but he was right there in person. A whiff of his alluring aftershave or a glancing kiss would seal the pact for most of the girls but few achieved it.

I would defiantly say I did not become his friend because he was better bait to hook, we just rather happened through various actions and events which pulled us together. It did become obvious when we both dressed up as girls for a Youth Club show and I noticed certain chicks still gazed starry eyed in hope at him with indifference tossed my way. It could be that I was not a fine looking as he but the certainly was that he was a genuine nice fella.

One of these chosen nights of female hunting, we decided to hit the Glasgow and Scotland’s famous Barrowland. Choosing to stop oft at the majestic Saracen heid, probably Glasgow’s oldest pub though there are people who state, in earnest ,that the city’s oldest working pub is “The College Bar” in High St. Anyway, we stepped the door into the Saracen Heid Inn to replenish our whistles for the night ahead.

Climbing the steep stairs to the dancing we flung open the barrier doors to see the crowd there were in full flow, whatever steps they were taking. In the outer circle they concentrated on the “Barra Slide” and being a simple movement anyone could take part while in the middle and outer rings, loads of the rest were doing their own thing and quite happy about it.

With a sharp pushback of the shoulders and then a lock forward of the neck(something like a chicken movement when it walks). This was vital before you forward on the floor, demonstrated so well and beautifully by Jack and Rikki (much missed Francie and Jossie) video’s of Scotland’s favorite due comedy act. Jim and I approached two dancers to take part and to our amazement, they waved dismissal to our craft advances. The actual words used were lost in the volume of sound within the hall but it was obvious the ladies were not interested.
O.K. we had been turned down before, and by better looking colleens, so we moved on in a instance and taped the shoulders of the next available ladies in arm reach and these wenches repeated what the first ones did but with more vigor.

As the music stopped we took stock, analyzing that we had only a few beers within us, and we had not forgotten to brush our teeth, our fly’s were closed, so on to the affray. To our horror the same happened and repeatedly to the point of predictability. We started to lose whatever cool we thought we had and just stomp up to the remaining talent, unmolested by us, and gesture a wish to dance with the answer being always the same. It went on and on into a vale of desperation and panic but to no avail but worse than that, no talent .and now……….. no chance?.

I do not know who suggested it or how fast it came, all I can remember is being refused through red haze and drinking a beer in the Sarry heid next moment. One thing was for sure, we retired defeated and totally rejected. We started to count and were amazed to find out no matter how we did the sums, that seventeen times we were refused a dance by a whole range and types of girls. It came to pass, with no words spoken, we elected to stay in the safety of the warm walls of the pub and I did get a lumber in there but I have trouble remembering exactly who?

I blamed Jim since he was supposed to be the handsome one to pull the birds but that just proved how much a cad I was because Jim never cast any onus or castigations.

People that are always nice, can be such bloody swine’s?.

I have latterly danced down the street on numerous occasions but two justifications springs to mind. Both took place well after midnight and after I had been told, someone not only cared for me but loved me, and I really cared for them .

Once I danced and sang at the top of my tonsils the entire road from the Embassy Cinema to Minard Rd just like “Singing in the Rain” but without the rain and puddles and umbrella and the skill of Master Gene Kelly and not the cop shop but with all the enthusiasm and boldness of a hop and shooglie dancer.

The other one was from Toryglen and Victoria Rd where I sang at the top of my voice a made up song that has gone with the wind beneath my feet. I sprang flipped and nearly flew as never before but all unseen, as far as I know?.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
*sairfinger*
used to go to the barrowland when it was a dance hall and iam always on the look for a band that i want to see so i can go back and she want it looks like now and reminise ahhhhh lol
enrique
cool.gif In my early years the only place to be on a Sunday wis the Barras, this is where you bought your wedding presents , a big favourite was the bedding pile you could get for a fiver, or the towels that were all great value, we even used to spend the day mostly at the outdoor stalls where the guys patter was like a visit to the comic halls, i once made the mistake of arguing with one o these blokes about the price of a purse he then offered me it for free if i would give my girl a kiss movie style, i did it in front of about a hundred people, good laugh though, who can forget Dannys delicious donuts, hot straight from the machine , we always meant to take some home but we never managed it, just ate them as we walked around, there was also the african guy selling the cure potions for warts and corns, he even had some auld yins on show, the horsey guys would give you a sure thing for the following weeks racing , it cost you half a crown
great days great charachters
TeeHeeHee
QUOTE (enrique @ 20th Nov 2009, 04:10pm) *
QUOTE
there was also the african guy selling the cure potions for warts and corns,



I remember him well ... now. wink.gif
He used to roll around on the ground moaning and groaning as if he was dying and then take a slug of his snake-skin oil and spring back onto his feet.
Loved going to the Barras.
Was better than the sea side biggrin.gif
Bestie
Seems such a small mistake to get into a lather about! On a different note..the barras has been there for many poor families for many years and I for one, would`nt have managed to present my weans with christmas gifts if it had`nt been for the many bargains to be had there. I think it is a crime itself to take it away from the many who depend on the ever famous barras! Stand up and fight folks, you have nothing to lose but our ain wee loved barras!!
Bestie
I can still smell and taste those beautiful hot doughnuts that used to be sold there...cooked in front of your eyes, dipped in sugar and plonked into a wee broon paper bag......mmmmmmmmm!!!!
ashfield
I don't think the Barra's market is even half as good as it was 20 or 30 years ago. There are so many fly-by-nights selling knock-off or counterfeit goods. It has been raided by police on several occasions (the last about a month ago) but procecutions rarely follow because of the expense involved. They usually settle for the forfeiture of the items involved. The atmosphere has changed to something that seems less relaxed and I don't know how they will get it back. It faces a lot of competition from boot sales etc and charity shops chasing the same markets.
*johnp*
Hi Used to go dancing at Barrowland in the 1950s ,,and the wife and i used to walk round the Barras and watch all the action on the back of lorries ,you could buy any thing there and christmas eve was the best night of the year,,
marydee
I am going to the Barrowland next Saturday to see the Sawdoctors and to feel the flerr bounce up and down in time to the music.
wombat
QUOTE (*johnp* @ 20th Nov 2009, 07:38pm) *
Hi Used to go dancing at Barrowland in the 1950s ,,and the wife and i used to walk round the Barras and watch all the action on the back of lorries ,you could buy any thing there and christmas eve was the best night of the year,,
wizzat they lorries that everythin fell off the back of johnp ? cool.gif wis brillyunt in 60s.
Heather
I couldn't care less if the Barra's closed.

It's a dirty smelly place. In saying that, it's years since I've been there. The last time I was there the smell made me sick, so I never went back.

It was good for bargains years ago and you got a laugh listening to the patter of the people selling their goods.
Mister Glasgow
The Barrowland Ballroom is the Barras .... and the Barras Market is the Ballroom ... Watch www.youtube.com/glasgowtelevision

I hail from the Barras area ..... THE DUGS IN THE SURROUNDING STREETS ARE ALSO THE BARRAS .........

Do you get what I am trying to say . And for all those who voiced there protest .THANKS ..

Cos ......if the Gstapo Glasgow city Idiots at the council ...have ther way , then there wo'nt be any of them
Rab-oldname
I saw Prince Monolulu there once. 'I GOTTA HORSE!'

My Dad bought a watch for my Mammy - when he gave it to her, there was no works inside it! Never did find the crook that sold it - lucky for him!
Elma
Thank you Heather, I thought I was the only one here who didn't like the "Barras". I was only there once and I couldn't get away quickly enough, I was with my boyfriend and I think we left after only 10 minutes. I was so uncomfortable with the crowds, the noise and the smell and I never went back.
Weir45
Used to love the Barras years ago. My sister was home from Canada couple of years back, and wanted to go to the Barras. She had her camera with her to take some pics.
Big burly fellow came up and told us in no uncertain terms, to take nae photies!
Needless to say, we couldn't get away quick enough.
pumps100
I agree with the previous posts. My wife and I used to go to the barras almost every Sunday in the mid -70's. Always in the rain and each time we went we vowed never again - but the next week we would be back.

It is now dead on its feet. We went recenty - I'm afraid car boots have killed it. Perhaps for the better.

Regards

Ian
possilboy
i remember the barras very well 1959 i painted all the stalls and the barrowland i also remember the wee indian selling the snake oil for corns he used to cut them off every week for years i think it was cooking oil in the wee bottles my auntie jinty had stall selling second hand clothes she was still doing it in 1997 when i was home cheers jw
NKS kid
My Mum hated going to the Barras but occasionally she relented and we would make the big trip from Maryhill. It took that long to get there on the bus we felt like we were in a different country by the time we got there.

I can't remember much about the stalls. Remember buying towels before I got married 30 years ago. Still got one to this day.

My Mum's favourite place - The Oyster Bar. We would walk into the steamy atmosphere. Find a seat and order plates of mussels. We would sit there in silence eating them until the plates were empty. I remember seeing customers, men mostly, come in to buy cups of brine. Maybe it was a good hangover cure. We always took bags of whelks and some clappie doos (not sure about spelling) home for my Dad.
PAUL DAVIDSON
Thank goodness someone has picked up that the Barrowland Ballroom is not the Barrowland(s), with an s attached. There is a lot of turkeys out there who don't come from the Calton.
frame
Did my heart just flip for a second there? My eyes shot to the Glenfiddich,hands shaking and then... no, it's just a mistake, it's fine, cool down.
Only kidding.
mind you, it was touch and go with the Glenfiddich.
viva la barras
wombat
wis a great place ,guy sellin china aff a truck "unbreakable'' he'd yell ,while boucing and smashing plates an cups off the bed of his truck, "a quid each" for a teaset an as ah remember guid quality.
don.stuart
Before the pubs opened 7 days a week the Barras was probably one of the only few places to go on a Sunday.You could spend a few hours wandering round the stalls,listen to music or nip in to a cafe and get fish and chips or pie and chips. It was a good place to buy records. I suppose it's a bit old fashioned now and maybe if the Council comes up with a better idea then we should applaud them.. The Barras was always a bit tacky, and maybe we should be looking forward, not back.I met my wife in the Barrowland Ballroom above,and I'll always remember feeling gutted when some yeas later the dance hall got burnt down . It was like the end of the world to me,and when it reopened, then Billy McGregor got the sack again I was broken hearted. Years later I got a Taxi to Maryhill and the driver was Billy.I felt so sorry for him although he wouldn't have wanted that. Billy McGregor and the Gaybirds to me were brilliant, and it's me that's probably getting auld.
joni-mo
THE BARRAS ROCK... biggrin.gif ... JONI
Tennscot
QUOTE (don.stuart @ 28th Nov 2009, 11:50am) *
Before the pubs opened 7 days a week the Barras was probably one of the only few places to go on a Sunday.You could spend a few hours wandering round the stalls,listen to music or nip in to a cafe and get fish and chips or pie and chips. It was a good place to buy records. I suppose it's a bit old fashioned now and maybe if the Council comes up with a better idea then we should applaud them.. The Barras was always a bit tacky, and maybe we should be looking forward, not back.I met my wife in the Barrowland Ballroom above,and I'll always remember feeling gutted when some yeas later the dance hall got burnt down . It was like the end of the world to me,and when it reopened, then Billy McGregor got the sack again I was broken hearted. Years later I got a Taxi to Maryhill and the driver was Billy.I felt so sorry for him although he wouldn't have wanted that. Billy McGregor and the Gaybirds to me were brilliant, and it's me that's probably getting auld.

I wondered what happend to Billy.!!! Iwent there three times a week in the early fifties, Jived a lot. met my Wife there. Lived across the street in Hunter St. when first married. Lotsa Memories. wub.gif
glasgow lass
I can remember going down to the Barras with my parents, they had an old friend who
had a spot to sell baby clothes, her name was Mamie Madden.
It was fun going down there, always packed as well.
possilboy
here is a few memories billy mcgregor and the bandstand
GG
Found the following explaining the strong link between the Barrowland and the Barras:
QUOTE
The History

The Barras market was founded in the early 1920s, by Margaret McIver (1880-1958). Margeret (then Morrison) began her career at twelve, tending a fruit barrow in Parkhead. In time, the money she accrued allowed her to open a small fruit shop in Bridgeton1. It was during this time that she met her future husband, James McIver, at the Glasgow fruit market. They were married in 18972.

The couple then set up a business renting horses and carts to other traders, who hawked their wares in the wealthier areas of Glasgow. To compliment this activity, land was acquired in Moncur Street and static barrows were rented out to traders at the weekend, allowing them to display and sell the wares they had acquired during the week. Initially, the market was open to the elements, but in 1926 the barrows were covered over. By 1931 the market had been completely enclosed, allowing the next stage in the evolution of the Barras.

The Ballroom

Margaret McIver had for some years arranged dinner dances for her stallholders. The difficulties she sometimes had in booking venues pursuaded her to build her own dance hall (she was a wealthy wooman by then). The hall was built on top of the market building, and was opened in 1934 as the Barrowlands Ballroom. This was to become one of the premier dancehalls in Glasgow, with the resident band Billy McGregor and the Gaybirds3 pulling in the punters for over two decades. At this time the ballroom and market were so famous that the neon sign in front of the ballroom was described in detail by Lord Haw Haw during his broadcasts4 (the sign was rapidly removed after this).

Then in 1958, just after the death of Margaret McIver, the ballroom burnt down. The McIver family rebuilt it as a tribute, and it was reopened in 1960. The ballroom continues to thrive to this day as one of the most popular rock venues in Glasgow, both with the fans and the bands.
enrique
I dont think anyone has mentioned Geordies Byre, this was a wee place away from the main ballroom where you went for a quiet canoodle, it had a wee dance floor and you could chat up your lumber for the night, the only thing about the Barrowland ballroom was that it was so popular that your lumber could be coming from anywhere in central Scotland , so you had to be smart and find out where she came from pretty quick, so you could dump her and get wan nearer hame, i once took a girl hame to the rid road flats in Elerslie, desperate or whit.
taurus
QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 20th Nov 2009, 06:49pm) *
Incidentally it gets right up my nose (plenty room there) when Barrowland is referred to as BarrowlandS. It happens all the time, especially in ads for gigs.

Me too and "The Barrowland" there is no "The" it`s Barrowland pure and simple.Always was and should always be.
serabash
a wee song we sang in the playground
who's awe goan tae the barrowland
honey honey
who's awe awe goan tae the barrowland
shake yer partner by the hand
honey oh baby now. laugh.gif
Scotsman
Ohhh.... the Barras are Better!! smile.gif

Not heard that cathcy wee ditty for a while!!
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