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jayemess
When researching family connections in Glasgow I learned that when my grandfather married my grandmother in the Western District of Cadder in 1903 his occupation was a Hospital Warden. I have assumed (but not confirmed) that he was employed at the Poor House as his address then was Edgefauld Road. Anyone know if records exist of employees at the Poor House?
RonD
Hello again:

I don't know anything about Barnhill but if you put Barnhill inn the search box above you'll see that it has been addressed previously on this board. Good luck.
buntyq
I have to stay something in defense of Forresthall, renamed from Barnhill Poor House. My mother was in and out of hospitals and finally was placed in Forresthall which was a hospital like nursing home for the elderly. I cant say enough for the good care she was given. Part of her old age pension was alloted for her care and she was given back some money for personal use.

It was too bad that Forresthall never recovered in name from the history of the location being the poorhouse. Yet, I wonder how many derelicts would have died in lodgings had it not been for the hospital section of Barnhill.
wellfield
I totally agree with bunty,I grew up next to it,the buildings were beautiful Victorian style,the gardens were very well kept,I remember it from the late 40s to the 70s,and knew many of the locals who were employed there and never ever heard any horror stories.I'ts not as if the people who lived there came from high life styles, these people were unwanted,old and infirm,they'd be much better taken care of there than living in a wee single end on their own,and they had indoor toilets! and cosidering our(some)living conditions at that time,that place would have looked like a fine hotel,and cheers to (Guest) for her Father working there,and to the others on this fine site that really do their homework on all these subjects!---Thank You.
wellfield
I totally agree with bunty,I grew up next to it,the buildings were beautiful Victorian style,the gardens were very well kept,I remember it from the late 40s to the 70s,and knew many of the locals who were employed there and never ever heard any horror stories.I'ts not as if the people who lived there came from high life styles, these people were unwanted,old and infirm,they'd be much better taken care of there than living in a wee single end on their own,and they had indoor toilets! and cosidering our(some)living conditions at that time,that place would have looked like a fine hotel,and cheers to (Guest) for her Father working there,and to the others on this fine site that really do their homework on all these subjects!---Thank You.
Ewan
QUOTE (wellfield @ 14th Apr 2008, 12:33 AM) *
would have looked like a fine hotel,and cheers to (Guest) for her Father working there,and to the others on this fine site that really do their homework on all these subjects!---Thank You.

Im the "guest" whose Dad was a Doctor there from the 70's to the 80's. I thought I should register because for anyone that interested I had some more stuff to add that I remember from days gone by.

G Block was the ward for dementia patients who had left us in mind so to speak. The rest of the blocks save the outer ones which were M and N block were for geriatric patients who had health issues at that point in time. M and N blocks were at the back of the hospital towards the huge wall facing the Red Road flats. I remember they also taught folk how to walk again the best they could after a stroke or a fall in M and N blocks. My Dad spent alot of time there and actually looked after his own Mother in M blovk when she passed away fro heart failure at 91.

He met my Mom in the hospital too. My Mom was from Renfrew originally but had went to Pediani's school of hairdressing in Springburn Road and had gotten a job at the Hospital doing the old folks hair. They dated for a while and then married.

The more I think about the place the more I realize now that in when I was playing in the place while he worked the hospital was on the decline. It had large sections of it closed off and un-used when I was there. The things inside it, like the bowling greens and tennis courts put there in the 20's I think, were largely unkept and overgrown. It did have huge fancy gardens though and a few big big greenhouses. I think the idea was that in the poorhouse when they did have a homeless unit, that they could grow some of their own food to eat. Least thats what I think I remember.

In early years there was a homeless unit in the hospital still. This would be in the mid 70's but it soon closed. I used to get a skelp from my Dad if I got caught "hingin aboot" with the homeless kids. I remember getting caught behind the mortuary building watching while three of them were sniffing evostik glue. I got leathered for that one. smile.gif

The other thing I loved about the place was the constantly burning midden they had in the grounds. AS an 7 year old kid this thing was pure magic for me to play in but I got manys the skelping for coming into the ward in the middle of a ward round stinkin of midden and smoke. I still love the nurses who would cluck and tsk and take me off to wash up. I often wonder what happened to most of them. Some of them would "ask the Doctor" if they could take the wean (me) to the shop. It had a wee sweetie shop up a corridor somewhere that you could buy a quarter of soor plooms midget gems, strawberry bon bons or strawberry sherbets and the like. Hows that for a blast from the past?

As I got older, it was the perfect place to learn to drive. The hospital had no traffic in the extensive wee roads in it at night because by this time it had become a social work place with only a few wards left which Dad oversaw. I could get in my Mums wee Datsun car and stall and bump the car round the place myself learning to work the clutch and the like.

When it closed my Dad still had 5 odd years left to retire, so they sent him to Possil Park Health center where he helped stroke patients walk again working with the physio's He retired and lasted another 8 or 9 years before he had a massive heart attack in 1999 and passed away.

As I said before, my sister works in Stobhill now and The Southern General, she is some kind of operating room nurse.

Me?

I live in Washington DC and am a Fire Fighter.

I miss fish suppers like you wouldnt believe. wub.gif
Elma
What an interesting post there Ewan, I never knew that hospital but your memories are great. Welcome to the boards, you will find lots of good things on here especially the memories which take you back, in some cases waaayyyy back biggrin.gif
wellfield
Hi Ewan,loved your wee story,itwas like a mini-movie,as I mentioned before I lived in that area,and when we were kids that place was always mysterious to us,some of the younger employees used to make up stories to scare us weans'---take care on your firefighting job.
Tennscot
One of my school Mates Lived in Barnhill. His Father was I think a Chief Engineer for the complex. I remember his house was lovely (Kinda Toffie) The grounds were great ,the building nice and I don`t remember anything including the Patients being anything but nice. I was young(going to Wellfield at the time) and to me it seemed like Going to Springburn Park with buildings. I lived in Wellfield St at that time.
Marguerite (Gita) Saunders
Hellow, Ewan and all posters on this topic. I believe my Grandma, Jessie REYNOLDS-COLTHART, nee MILLER, in Thurso, may have spent time in Glasgow's Barnhill Poor House. She had three illegitimate children by William Colthart (in 1911, 1913 and 1915); he was in and out of "the jile" regularly over a period of 40 years (12 convictions) each with 5-7 year sentences, so I assume he got out early on a few occasions.

In 1917, while William was inside, Gran effectively married a sailor, James William REYNOLDS (a stoker abord HMS Zaria); sadly he died just two years later, of concussion, in Greenock. In 1920, she hooked up again with the faither of her 2 surviving weans (her 3rd child, William, had died the day he was born, in 1915).

I learned from her Poor Relief records (got from the Mitchell Library) that she was put in the "Eastern" that day in 1915. At first I thought the "eastern" might be a Glasgow hospital, like the Great Western, but I'm told it was probably the "Eastern Hostel", a euphemism for the Barnhill poor house.

Can anybody out there confirm that piece of information?

Gita (in South Carolina, USA)
_______________________________

QUOTE (Ewan)
Im the "guest" whose Dad was a Doctor there ...
wellfield
Hi Marguerite, you're story has the beginnings of a great novel.Someone may know more ,as there are many learned people on this site,but the Eastern sounds like a similar place to Barnhill( Foresthall)---it's now a nice housing estste,but ah' love yer' Grannie Jessie already!
veesixteen
Thanks! Yes, when you think about it, my Grannie was just a wee farm-girl from Thurso who probably dreamed about the "big city lights" in Glasgow, that she may have heard or read about (remember, no TV nor any picture houses in the late 19th century).

Grandpa "Wullie" Colthart was in his mid-fifties, and Gran in her late twenties, when she met him (on a farm?) in Fife. Far from home, I guess she sought the warmth and companionship of this "father figure" ...and ended up with three of his weans in quick succession, while "oor Wullie" kept popping in and out of jail (12 convictions in 40 years !)

During one of his incarcerations, she met and married a "sailor boy" closer to her own age and he supported her until his accidental death, in Greenock, just two years later. How she hooked up again with Wullie, we'll never know; in any case she ended up marrying him the year after her first husband's death.

Now I'm trying to find out from HM Prisons the full list of heinous crimes committed by Grandpa and the actual time served in each case. I wonder if they might also have "mug shots" of him; I'd love to hang them on the wall, at home, beside the photo of my paternal Grandpa (a Swiss newspaper editor and Red Cross VIP who counted Winston Churchill among his many connections) and my husband's Grandpa in full military regalia (he was a General in the French army in WW1).

BTW, Mum never mentioned her parents to me; she just told me one day when I was 5 or 6 that I had no grandparents, so I assumed they had died. She never mentioned having a wee sister, Jessie, named after her mother [I am now trying to find more about Jessie Jr.; so far all I've got is her date of birth in 1913, but it's a start]. I find it surprising that Mum was able to get so far ahead of the game! She went to Shawland Academy then to the Secretarial College in Glasgow before heading for London's "big city lights" (like her own Mum?) when she was 21. She married a well-to-do Sassenach in 1938 and I have photos of [and visited in 2000!] her beautiful, former home in Surrey where she engaged in such gentlewomanly sports as golf and fox-hunting! Sadly, that marriage ended in divorce and she remained single until she met and married my Dad, a Swiss businessman, in NY in 1948. She had gone there in 1946 as a member of the UK delegation at the founding of the United Nations in Flushing Meadows. Quite a change from the squalor of the Glasgow poor house!

If anyone reading these posts knows where I might get information about inmates in Scottish prisons from, say, 1880-1925, please let me know. Thanks.
______________________________________________
QUOTE (wellfield @ 20th Aug 2008, 12:52am) *
Hi Marguerite, you're story has the beginnings of a great novel ...
Guest Ewan *
Its Ewan again. Im sorry I forgot the password smile.gif

To the lady in South Carolina, I hope the following helps.

The Eastern she refers to was acyually the "The Great Eastern Hotel." This was a former Victorian hotel which had all the fabulous Iron work and the like but fell into disrepair and was turned into a "poor house"

It was located on Duke Street towards High Street and funnily enough was located across the street from the Duke Street Prison which was a womans jail. Im betting alot of the women inmates flip flopped between the two institutions in their time biggrin.gif

Here is a picture of It I found. I hope it helps
Ewan
Scratch some of the info in my post about the Great Eastern.

After looking for it on Google, I found out it was actually a textile mill up until 1907, when it was turned into a poor house.

Ewan
Washington DC
Rab-oldname
Anyone interested in the Barnhill Poorhouse will find masses of interest if you CLICK HERE!

Some photos HERE!
Paulines47
Thanks for the link Rab. My Grandfather died in there in 1964, so it is of immense interest to me & my newly found relatives.

Just as a matter of interest; on my Grandfather's death certificate they didn't actually put on there that it was a hospital, they just put an address. It was only when i joined GG last October that i found out it was a hospital.....up until then i'd thought it was a house.

Many thanks again Rab....it's people like you that help novices like me greatly with our research.
wellfield
Good site Rab!...Thank You!
Teenybash
As a young pupil nurse back in 1979 aged 17, Foresthall was the first hospital I worked in, being seconded from Stobhill. I was there for two months and remember well how terrified I was the first day, of this large imposing building. On a back shift, well my imagination would run away with me as I walked down for the bus, I always thought the building was creepy.

I worked in what was called back then 'the psycho geriatric' female ward. Even then the stigma of Barnhill lived on and some of the ladies used to comment on how upset they were to be ending their days in 'the poorhoose'.

I'm glad to hear it's long gone now.

Teenybash
Ian
Foresthall! I was one of the homeless kids there in the very late '60s/early '70s. It was a horrible place, scary after dark and with constant sectarian fighting among the kids.

I remember playing around the mortuary building, playing in the coal pile and I remember a bunch of kids having their stomachs pumped for eating the berrys because they missed dinner.

I remember some of the buildings were in a sad state of disrepair. We'd play in the abandoned ones and one little boy almost lost a leg sliding down a banister that had broken glass embedded in it.

There was one guy who seemed nice enough, but I think he was a social worker. The other staff seemed to take great pleasure in shouting orders and smacking the kids around whenever our mothers weren't looking.

We left Foresthall and moved into a basement flat in Oatlands, then to the top floor of a tenement in Parkhead. I think I was the only Proddy who could see into Celtic park from my house.

We moved to Barlanark in the mid '70s and had indoor toilets again, but I still shudder when I think of Foresthall.
*Buddhabelly*
hi there i am looking for information on a Jeannie scott who is my mum's mother and stay at 657 edgefauld road glasgow and Jeannie scott work as a domestic servant and was born in 1926 and all i know is that she could have been in the barnhill poorhouse then foresthall and i would be grateful if anyone had any information and reall would be grateful if anyone had pictures of my mum's mum and i would be grateful and thanks and wait to her from anyone who has any info and any pictures and if jeannie scott is still living she would be 86 years of age and thank u
wellfield
QUOTE (*Buddhabelly* @ 15th Jun 2010, 05:36am) *
hi there i am looking for information on a Jeannie scott who is my mum's mother and stay at 657 edgefauld road glasgow and Jeannie scott work as a domestic servant and was born in 1926 and all i know is that she could have been in the barnhill poorhouse then foresthall and i would be grateful if anyone had any information and reall would be grateful if anyone had pictures of my mum's mum and i would be grateful and thanks and wait to her from anyone who has any info and any pictures and if jeannie scott is still living she would be 86 years of age and thank u

Hi..There's tons of info on threads such as Barnhill..Foresthall...Workhouses...may take a wee bit of going back through the threads concerned on this site......There is a great site for finding people from the past ...Scotlands People..if you have to dig in deep,it may cost you a few bucks...we traced our Family back to the late 1600's and the other side back to the 1700's incuding marriage certificates.....Good Luck.
*chippyjim*
QUOTE (Paulines47 @ 21st Mar 2010, 02:18pm) *
Thanks for the link Rab. My Grandfather died in there in 1964, so it is of immense interest to me & my newly found relatives.

Just as a matter of interest; on my Grandfather's death certificate they didn't actually put on there that it was a hospital, they just put an address. It was only when i joined GG last October that i found out it was a hospital.....up until then i'd thought it was a house.

Many thanks again Rab....it's people like you that help novices like me greatly with our research.

hi this is chippy jim barber at foresthall 1964 to 67 i worked in all the male wards at that time must have cut ur g dads hair or shaved him used too play draughts up in the dermo ward had good times withpatients and staff in all wards chippyjim
brit
QUOTE (Ewan @ 6th May 2008, 05:36pm) *
Im the "guest" whose Dad was a Doctor there from the 70's to the 80's. I thought I should register because for anyone that interested I had some more stuff to add that I remember from days gone by.

G Block was the ward for dementia patients who had left us in mind so to speak. The rest of the blocks save the outer ones which were M and N block were for geriatric patients who had health issues at that point in time. M and N blocks were at the back of the hospital towards the huge wall facing the Red Road flats. I remember they also taught folk how to walk again the best they could after a stroke or a fall in M and N blocks. My Dad spent alot of time there and actually looked after his own Mother in M blovk when she passed away fro heart failure at 91.

He met my Mom in the hospital too. My Mom was from Renfrew originally but had went to Pediani's school of hairdressing in Springburn Road and had gotten a job at the Hospital doing the old folks hair. They dated for a while and then married.

The more I think about the place the more I realize now that in when I was playing in the place while he worked the hospital was on the decline. It had large sections of it closed off and un-used when I was there. The things inside it, like the bowling greens and tennis courts put there in the 20's I think, were largely unkept and overgrown. It did have huge fancy gardens though and a few big big greenhouses. I think the idea was that in the poorhouse when they did have a homeless unit, that they could grow some of their own food to eat. Least thats what I think I remember.

In early years there was a homeless unit in the hospital still. This would be in the mid 70's but it soon closed. I used to get a skelp from my Dad if I got caught "hingin aboot" with the homeless kids. I remember getting caught behind the mortuary building watching while three of them were sniffing evostik glue. I got leathered for that one. smile.gif

The other thing I loved about the place was the constantly burning midden they had in the grounds. AS an 7 year old kid this thing was pure magic for me to play in but I got manys the skelping for coming into the ward in the middle of a ward round stinkin of midden and smoke. I still love the nurses who would cluck and tsk and take me off to wash up. I often wonder what happened to most of them. Some of them would "ask the Doctor" if they could take the wean (me) to the shop. It had a wee sweetie shop up a corridor somewhere that you could buy a quarter of soor plooms midget gems, strawberry bon bons or strawberry sherbets and the like. Hows that for a blast from the past?

As I got older, it was the perfect place to learn to drive. The hospital had no traffic in the extensive wee roads in it at night because by this time it had become a social work place with only a few wards left which Dad oversaw. I could get in my Mums wee Datsun car and stall and bump the car round the place myself learning to work the clutch and the like.

When it closed my Dad still had 5 odd years left to retire, so they sent him to Possil Park Health center where he helped stroke patients walk again working with the physio's He retired and lasted another 8 or 9 years before he had a massive heart attack in 1999 and passed away.

As I said before, my sister works in Stobhill now and The Southern General, she is some kind of operating room nurse.

Me?

I live in Washington DC and am a Fire Fighter.

I miss fish suppers like you wouldnt believe. wub.gif

I was one of the homeless kids in Forest Hall in Nov1973 to Feb 1974 ...I remember the place well and i love your post of your memories......I remember going to school i dont know if just off the grounds or what, but the kids would not play with my brother and i because we were from Forest Hall....crazy.....The place was hugh we were in a small room with 2 beds, a table and chairs .... only there a cpl months but the memory is there......Thanks for the info
jonsglasgowguide
QUOTE (Ian @ 25th Mar 2010, 03:13am) *
Foresthall! I was one of the homeless kids there in the very late '60s/early '70s. It was a horrible place, scary after dark and with constant sectarian fighting among the kids.

I remember playing around the mortuary building, playing in the coal pile and I remember a bunch of kids having their stomachs pumped for eating the berrys because they missed dinner.

I remember some of the buildings were in a sad state of disrepair. We'd play in the abandoned ones and one little boy almost lost a leg sliding down a banister that had broken glass embedded in it.

There was one guy who seemed nice enough, but I think he was a social worker. The other staff seemed to take great pleasure in shouting orders and smacking the kids around whenever our mothers weren't looking.

We left Foresthall and moved into a basement flat in Oatlands, then to the top floor of a tenement in Parkhead. I think I was the only Proddy who could see into Celtic park from my house.

We moved to Barlanark in the mid '70s and had indoor toilets again, but I still shudder when I think of Foresthall.


Hi Ian and all who are interested...I was one of the children who lived in foresthall in late 69 and into early 1970 and I was also one of the children who had their stomachs pumped due to the berry eating incident my name back then was John Logue and in march 1970 my mother managed to secure a nice 3 bedroomed house (in Blackhill) for herself and her six children and my youngest sister who was born in may that year sad thing is we were put into there because my father had been sent to prison for not paying rents or whatever and my mother and I think four of us children were sent there and my other two siblings went to live with relatives until she had secured the new house just as sadly she was silly enough to take my father back when he was released from prison and we had 7 and a half years living in one of the worst areas of glasgow as it turned out...and when we moved from there to Priesthill it wasn't much better but thankfully we that is all the children have much better lives as adults now not that we are richer or better off particularly just that we are better people than our parents were and we now tell these stories to our children and I imagine it horrifies them to hear things that only they can imagine...on a lighter note I also remember an elderly lady who we all sang watzing matilda to as I am sure she was an old Australian who was as we would have put it (not politically correct by todays standards) but it would be doowally I suppose and we were very naive at the time and didn't think we were that bad I suppose looking back it carved our futures as young adults and now we all have our own children we do have something to say we will never do to our children...god bless you all who remember this place...and finally I do actually believe that if there were more time and money spent on this place those beautiful victorian buildings would be much better to look at than the horrible new properties that sit in it's place...
ashfield
Interesting story John, thanks for sharing it with us. It sounds like you were able to use the experience in a positive way.
GlasgowVisitor
My mum Eleanor also spent a short time here in a family unit when they were homeless in the early 70s though she can't remember exactly when, she would have been aged roughly between 5 and 8. Her parents were David and Nancy and her younger sister was Lorraine. Depending on when they stayed there her other younger sister may have been there as a baby (she was born in 73) - wondering if anyone remembers her family or if anyone has photos of the inside of the place, Google results seem to be fairly limited!
Patricia Rafferty
I remember that some of my mother's family were employed in Forest Hall Hospital. Her brother, his wife, her sister and her husband and my sister's husband! So it was always part of the family talk but as I was young at the time I didn't really take in what kind of place it was. I know that when it closed down my mother's brother and his wife became manager and Matron of an old peoples home and her brother who worked in the pharmacy was transferred to another Glasgow Hospital. My brother in law also became manager of an old peoples home.
Gill
I worked in the homeless families unit in 1976... I was 21, and had to do different shifts. On the night shift we had to try to get some kip on 2 chairs pushed together in the staff room, after I had done some embroidery for hours. Huge high ceilings. We had virtually no training, and I found it knackering and depressing... Nothing for residents to do all day, no workshops, nothing. I remember sloshing out the porridge in the morning after a night shift. I got myself transferred to the under fives play room which was much more fun, and worked with some fabulous young women, wish I could remember their names! I remember we got the news that Elvis had died one morning, and everyone was crying.
Kinmond
Hi, I was born in the Barnhill poor house in 1947. My father was at sea and my mother went to live back with her parents. My grandfather James Maltman was at the time Governor of the facility.
We emigrated to Canada in 1948 but often went back to visit with my grandparents.
My mother grew up in Barnhill along with her 2 brothers and 1 sister.

I remember wee maggie who was only about 3 ft tall who was in charge of the tuck shop...the matrons and nurses were always glad to see us and encouraged us to sit and talk to the old folk.
Ronnie B
I worked in Forest hall Hospital , yes their was also a home less unit within the hospital next to C-Block but the hospital side was a transfer unit from Stobhill for long term patients just like Duke Street, Belvidere and other hospitals that would take long term patients , the staffs dedication was second to none to the patients that were in their care I know as my father in-law worked there for 35+ years and proud to say he worked in Foresthall Hospital / the old Barnhill and Stobhill with a lot of great memories we still talk about to this day.
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