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> Parson Street
Oor Wullie
post 22nd Dec 2006, 01:26am
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Looking at the excellent Glasgow Street Map provided at this site I am [ pleasantly] surprised to see that Parson Street is still shown. I thought it had gone completely.

Does anybody know what's there now ?.
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d.c.
post 22nd Dec 2006, 12:17pm
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Hi Wullie ... I think only a small section of the street still remains.

Martyrs School, one of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's buildings, is still there.

St Mungo's Chapel is also still there and I think the adjoining priests' residence and Marist Brothers' home may be too, but St Mungo's Academy is gone.

DC
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GG
post 22nd Dec 2006, 03:21pm
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Yes, you're correct d.c., only these three buildings remain, as shown on the satellite image from Google maps below. To me, nothing symbolises more graphically the destruction of Townhead than this street that leads to nowhere, I always feel a tinge of regret when I walk past it a few times during the week walking home from work, even though I have no memory of old Townhead other than the Townhead Library which was demolished in the nineties.

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GG
post 22nd Dec 2006, 04:03pm
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Here's a photograph taken in the summer last year from the walkway over the Springburn Expressway, which shows:

Mackintosh's Martyrs' School Left of photo
QUOTE
Martyrs' School

The Martyrs' Public School, in the Townhead area of Glasgow, was opened at a formal ceremony on 2 August 1897.

The History

The 1872 Education Act required that public education be provided for all children from age five to about age 11 to 13, and every School Board throughout Scotland was then engaged in an extensive school building programme.

The School Board of Glasgow - covering what is now the centre of the city - faced the challenge of a large, rapidly expanding population housed in a relatively small area It commissioned numerous new schools.

The School Board of Glasgow covered the area which is now the centre of the city, and had to face the challenge of a rapidly expanding population housed in a relatively small area. It commissioned a number of new schools, and decided to distribute its commission throughout the City's architectural businesses. Experimentation governed by a strict economic discipline led architects to produce a variety of imaginative designs. Other School Boards in Scotland used a limited number of architects.

The School

Martyrs' School was commissioned in 1895. The established local architectural firm Honeyman & Keppie was given the brief of providing a school to house between 900 and 1000 'scholars'. In the twenty years since the Education Act, a convention had been established for the layout of new Glasgow schools, and Martyrs' was expected to follow it: schools were to be symmetrical, with classrooms surrounding a central communal space and separate entrances and staircases for boys and girls.

The school has three storeys plus a basement. The basement contained a darkroom, workshop, staff changing room, and heating plant with air ducts and a fuel store. On the ground floor, the drill hall was in the centre, with dressing rooms and four classrooms leading off it. There were five classrooms on both the first and second floors, linked on each floor by a balcony around the space created by the central hall. In addition, there was a headmasters' study, staff room janitors' room, book storage are and medical room, and cloakrooms on each floor. The internal walls contained the ventilation and heating ducts. The completed building cost 9,630, which was within the budget of 10,000 allocated for it.

When the school was built, it sat among rows of four-story tenements, which have long since been demolished.

St Mungo's Church Right background
QUOTE
Designed by the London architect George Goldie 1869 in French Gothic style. High altar by Gillespie, Kidd and Coia 1952. The church is in the care of the Passionist congregation. five apsidal chapels include St Paul of the Cross founder of the Passionists St Margaret of Scotland, and Our Lady of Sorrows which has a Portuguese polychrome wood statue. Late 19th-century stained glass by Mayer of Munich. Gothic-style timber confessionals. Opposite Charles Rennie Mackintoshs Martyrs School, and five minutes walk from Glasgow Cathedral and the St Mungo Museum.
Saint Mungo's Church is the only place in the historic centre of Glasgow where the Christian community gathers for prayer and worship morning, midday, and evening, every day.

Founded in 1850, the present parish is bounded by the Rottenrow (south), Petershill Road and Keppochill Road (north), North Hanover Street and Pinkston Road (west), and Wishart Street, Royston Square and Auchinloch Street (east). Since 1865 the parish has been in the care of the priests and brothers of the Congregation of the Passion (the Passionists).

In 1999 St Stephen's Parish, Sighthill, was united with Saint Mungo's. A group of Passionist Sisters (Sisters of the Cross and Passion) established a community in Pinkston Drive, Sighthill, and now work in the parish team with their Passionist brothers.


Also, some more info about CRM and Parson Street
QUOTE
Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Parson Street, Townhead

Parson Street was once a busy part of the city, but is now in many ways isolated from the rest of Townhead by the M8 motorway and by the housing that was built after the demolition of the old tenement blocks in the 1960s and 1970s.

A map of the area from 1821 shows a largely undeveloped area on the north-eastern edge of the city, with the only substantial building being the Deaf and Dumb Institute, which stood on the site of the present St Mungo's Retreat, across the road from Martyrs' School.

Over the next twenty years, the city grew rapidly, expanding it industrial base. New houses were needed to accommodate the influx of workers who came mainly from the Highlands in the wake of the Highland Clearances, and from Ireland after a succession of potato famines.

Townhead soon became one of the most densely populated areas in Europe. Its tenements became overcrowded with workers and their families, and the buildings themselves were now blackened by the grime of the many industrial processes taking place within the city, which was now being seen as the 'Second City of the Empire'.

Within a small area there were chemical works,foundries, clay pipe makers, locomotive builders, glass makers, timber yards, potters, distillers, coopers, haulage contractors, railways, as well as shops selling food, drink, clothing and everything else a busy community needs.

In general, the area had become one of the poorer areas in the city, but there were some professional people living here, and they could easily walk into their offices in the city centre.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh was born into the Townhead community on 7 June 1868. His father, William, was born in Ireland and he worked in the Central Police Office, effectively as personal manager to the Chief Constable.

William married Margaret Rennie in 1862 in Dennistoun, where they lived until they moved to a tenement at 74 Parson Street in 1863/4 with their first child, Margaret. In 1865 they moved again, this time to number 70 Parson Street, where Charles (by this time their fourth child) was born. The family remained at 70 Parson Street until they moved back to Dennistoun in 1875.

The young Charles Rennie Mackintosh would have known these streets well. Just around the corner in Glebe Street lived his widower grandfather, and later his aunt and uncle would move into the area. Other uncles lived nearby in Garngadhill.

Charles would have grown up alongside George Goldie's St Mungo's Church, opened in 1869, and the adjoining Academy, but would have missed the construction of Father Osmund Cooke's Retreat, which was built after he moved to Dennistoun.

GG.

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Oor Wullie
post 29th Dec 2006, 04:33am
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Many thanks to d.c. and GG for the info on Parson St.

Nice to see, at least, that my old primary school is still there, as well as St. Mungo's Church. My granfdather was caretaker at the church for many years.
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sumac
post 1st Jan 2007, 11:14pm
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Oorwullie, it breaks my heart to see photos of (or to go on visits to) my old home street. My tenement close was attached to St. Mungo's schoolyard. Most of my aunts and uncles, and my grandparents, too, lived within the square formed by Parson Street, Martyr Street, McAuslan Street and Glebe Street. All of that square is now gone.
On one of our visits to Martyr's Primary, I looked over to where my house stood - nothing but roads and interchanges. In the last picture, our tenement stood to the right of St. Mungo's School, straight across the road from Martyr's School. We walked along Parson Street every morning to get to St. Davids Primary - you can't walk straight along the street now, and my old school has gone, too.
Townhead and Springburn were blasted off the face of the earth - along with our heritage. I can never show my kids where I came from or how I lived then. It's unforgivable.


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*DEREK McCARRON*
post 22nd Mar 2007, 02:30pm
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i lived at no.7 parson st on the corner of stanhope st between 1965/1967.i attended st.mungos primary school and made my holy communion at st mungos church .my family left the townhead in late august 1967 and by 1969 it was gone pulled down in the regenerate glasgow project.families where moved to new housing estates in outlying areas with fancy names like castlemilk ,drumchapel,east kilbride and easthouse.for some more information on townhead,glebe st mcauslan st,parson st and some photos of said areas search for parliamentary road glasgow.i think if you are interisted in ninteensixties townhead you will be pleasently suprised.goodbye i hope you enjoy the pictures.
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*M*
post 16th Apr 2007, 10:07pm
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saint mungos church , old martyrs school now mueseum , saint mungos primary school are all still standing in parson street
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Oor Wullie
post 14th May 2007, 02:05am
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I recently got a PM from a member of the Buchanan family, who owned the newsagents in Parson Street.

Those who were acquainted with the area at the time will possibly just be able to make out the shop in the distance. on the left hand side of the picture.
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jock
post 14th May 2007, 05:47am
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I attended St. Mungo's Academy from 1942 to 1947. Was a great school which has served me well. Thanks for the history and photos. I prefer to remember it as it was.
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lianmy
post 14th May 2007, 08:20am
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I remember Buchanan's well, my mum used to get our comics from there and everyday when I first started school she would buy me a wagon wheel from there.
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Rabbie
post 23rd Jun 2007, 12:50am
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QUOTE (Oor Wullie @ 14th May 2007, 03:22 AM) *
I recently got a PM from a member of the Buchanan family, who owned the newsagents in Parson Street.

Those who were acquainted with the area at the time will possibly just be able to make out the shop in the distance. on the left hand side of the picture.


Jings Wullie.

That is a really nice image, sorry been a bit tary with me reply, been awa a wee bitty again.

You know, it's just the way I like to remember Parson St.

Smoky and foggy and at night with the pale blue street lights which gave a strange, yet warm etherial glow. The closes begged to be explored by kids of my generation. There was no fear of strangers or anything like the stuff we have saturation media coverage of these days.

Mi'by you remember Wullie Brittons, the Grocers, he was next to Felix the Cobblers, near Castle St end? There wus a pub on the coarner just next to The Casino fleapit.

Brings a wee tear to my eyes that most you can see is gone for nigh on coming 40 years, BUT it heartens me that you can still touch base with the remaining buildings.

The heart and soul of Toonheid was ripped out in late 60's / early 70's and was scattered to the winds or stuffed in multistory flats dotted around. I wunner where all the souls are now.

I stayed in 81 Taylor St, prolly now called 4 Taylor Place, during 70/76.

This block of flats was built during 67/69 at end of Parson St / Ronald St where Taylor St met this *junction*

I think we flitted from 61 Ally Parade sometime during Feb 1970. IT was the year before we went *decimal <spits>
.
My Maw and Da hud to draw a lots to see wit flair you goat a hoose oan. As luck wid have it. some very auld housebound fowks who had lived for 40/50 years in a ground floor tenement got posted 24 stories upske, seperated from their caring freinds.
So sad, I remember so many old lonely folk who where aimlessly lost. A sad oversight by the planning authorities. Lets hope that socail disaster that this *redevelopment* entailed has imparted a message to the powers that be. NEVER AGAIN!

Oanwi, where wus I.

I remember running up the stairs all the way to 24 without looking out a window, when I got to top, well.

I seen Central Glasgow as never before, a layer of smog with chimmeys, church spires projecting out. Beyond that, Ben Lomand, Campsie Fells, Cathkin Braes. A sea of Black and Grey with such colourful surroundings. At night it was breathtaking, but got better when the wind blew the smog away.

After I came back down to Earth, Mission Control, aka My Maw. She gave me a right bollocking, "wit ye daeing goin up there steps, ye might huv fawn oot a windie"

Bless her, she was skart of heights and was feart jist stepping off a kerb, someting as a kid I never did, by her genepool is in me an these days I brick it jist going wan rung up a ladder. Noo, it is ladders in stoakings, that a diffent matter.

I love my dear city Auld of Glasgow, I miss its past and it's many, many colourful characters and our unique and vibrent history.

Just wish I has some on my granddas photties he took during 50 / 60's of the changes taking place in Toonheid, they would be priceless. All memories are but I would share them as I know they would bring back so many happy memories of a place long gone but never forgotten.

Fond wishes my freinds, and lang may yer lums reek and the yer drampot be overflowing. An a wee sherry or 6 for the wumen *hehe*

Rabbie *

One day, I shall return!

Loack up yer dugs and cats! and pit yer horse an cart roon the back coort.

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Melody
post 24th Jun 2007, 06:21pm
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What a lovely post Rabbie. smile.gif
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Isobel
post 24th Jun 2007, 10:59pm
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I remember visiting Glasgow after an absence of about 18years. I wanted to see where I had lived in Ruchazie, well it was gone. I then went to Viewpark Ave in Dennistoun where I had lived till I was ten years of age, There is a street there caled Viewpark but its not the street I lived on. Ok I thought lets head to ma grans place in Townhead. Yes it was also gone, I love Glasgow and I think the improvement have been fantasitc.However from a very selfish point of view I hated not being able to visit the Glasgow I remember.Now its Bearsden and Bishopbriggs .Great places but not my home. huh.gif


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*Doreen*
post 26th Aug 2008, 11:26am
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For anyone wishing a wee bit of nostalgie the "Goner" photo books are great...I've got "Old Dennistoun's a gonner"..."Garngad" and "Townhead"...my family came from Townhead and it is so sad the changes to that area....they blitzed it and that was that!.....the photographs in these books are great though....
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