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> Common Irish Surnames In Scotland, Irish surnames commonly found in Scotland
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RonD
post 2nd Aug 2007, 10:54am
Post #166


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Thanks Paul: It's amazing how many of the Western Isles and Antrim names are interchangeable.

Cheers


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wee mags
post 2nd Aug 2007, 12:46pm
Post #167


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My Grandparents name was Halfpenny my granddads family came from Ireland


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Paul Kelly
post 3rd Aug 2007, 07:24am
Post #168


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I have never heard of the Halfpenny surname before but I have just done a little research on it. Despite the fact that a small English Halfpenny Planter family probably settled in the east of Ireland in the 17th century, it seems that the majority of Halfpennys in the east of Ireland are descendants of the native Gaelic Irish O'hAilpin family who adopted Halfpenny as the Anglicised version of their surname in the years following the 17th century Plantations in Ireland. In the west of Ireland, the O'hAilpin surname was usually Anglicised as Halpin.

In post #163 I was discussing the Irish surname McAteer and the Scottish surname McIntyre and the intermingling of these 2 surnames. In a similar vain, McArthur is a Scottish surname originating in Argyll. The McArthurs are said to be related to the Campbells of Argyll. During the 17th century Scottish Plantation of Ulster a number of McArthurs settled in Ulster. The McArthur surname is often spelt McCarter in Ulster - this is how an Irishman would pronounce the McArthur surname! However, it seems that a few of the Scottish Protestant McArthur/McCarter Planters in Ulster adopted the native Irish McAteer surname. Moreover, in post #163 I said it appears that most of the 19th century Irish McAteer immigrants to Scotland had their surnames recorded correctly as McAteer. However, there is some evidence that a few of the 19th century Irish McAteer immigrants to Scotland had their surnames recorded incorrectly as the Scottish surname McArthur.

The native Irish McGuinness (sometimes spelt McGinness or Magennis) surname originates in County Down in southeast Ulster and the surname is commonly found throughout Ulster. McInnes is an unrelated Scottish surname. It seems that a few Scottish Protestant McInnes Planters settled in Ulster in the 17th century and most of them adopted the native Irish McGuinness/Magennis surname. It also seems likely that a few of the 19th century Irish McGuinness immigrants to Scotland would have had their surnames recorded in the Scottish form of McInnes.

In the same way, I am sure there has also been some intermingling of the Irish surname Ennis and the Scottish surname Innes.


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Paul Kelly
post 3rd Aug 2007, 11:21am
Post #169


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In post #154 I was discussing the McAuley surname which is commonly found in County Antrim and I said that approximately a half of the Antrim McAuleys are Catholic and the other half are Protestant. Recently, I have been contacted by someone from Northern Ireland in connection with post #154, and another surname which is commonly found in County Antrim - McCambridge - has been drawn to my attention.

The McCambridge surname originates in the southern part of the Kintyre peninsula, Argyll, Scotland. During the 17th century Scottish Plantation of Ulster, a number of Protestant McCambridge families were encouraged to move from Kintyre to north Antrim. By the 18th century, the McCambridge surname was virtually unheard of in Scotland. Nearly all the McCambridges were now living in County Antrim. I have been informed (reliably I hope!) that approximately a half of the McCambridges in County Antrim today are Protestant and the other half are Catholic. Given that the 17th century Scottish McCambridge Planters from Kintyre were Protestants you might wonder why this situation has arisen. There are 2 possible explanations. Firstly, the northern part of County Antrim (around the Glens of Antrim) is the part of County Antrim where Catholics are in the majority. So given that the McCambridge Planters settled in north Antrim amongst many Catholic families, it is likely that some McCambridge men have married into these Catholic families over the past 4 centuries. Of course, mixed marriages have never been that common in Ulster so another possible explanation is that some Catholic McCambridge families moved from Kintyre to north Antrim in the 16th century before the late 16th century Reformation in Scotland. If you look at a map of the British Isles you will see that the islands of Britain and Ireland are closest between the Mull of Kintyre and the north Antrim coast. There have been many migrations back and forward between Kintyre and north Antrim over the past 2 millennia. It seems likely that some McCambridge families from southern Kintyre settled in north Antrim in the early to mid 16th century before the large and organised 17th century Scottish Plantation of Ulster.

The McCambridge surname was reintroduced into Scotland in the mid 19th century by Irish immigrants. Most, if not all, of the McCambridges in Scotland today are descendants of 19th century Irish immigrants from Ulster, especially County Antrim.

For further discussion of the McCambridge surname, see post #65 of the topic 'Are the Scots Really Irish?


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Paul Kelly
post 3rd Aug 2007, 03:02pm
Post #170


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The Tinney (or Tinny) surname is meant to have originated in the north of England. My greatgreatgrandmother was a Catherine (Kate) Tinney from Meenavoy, Stranorlar, County Donegal (born circa 1840). It seems that there was a small English Tinny Planter family in County Donegal. However, the majority of Tinneys in County Donegal appear to be descended from the native Gaelic Irish MacAntSionnaigh (pronounced McAtinney) family who Anglicised their surname to Tinney in the years following the 17th century Plantations in Ireland. I think Kate Tinney was from this native Irish family.

In the 1857 Griffith's Valuation for County Donegal (which lists the heads of all the households in Donegal c1857) Kate's father - my greatgreatgreatgrandfather - is listed as a John Tunny of Meenavoy, Stranorlar. I think John Tunny was born in Drumkeen, Convoy, Donegal in the early 1800s and he married and settled in Meenavoy, Stranorlar. John Tunny's children and grandchildren all spelled their surname Tinney.

Tunney or Tunny (O'Tonnaigh) is a surname associated with Counties Mayo and Sligo in the west of Ireland and is often confused with the Donegal Tinney (Mac an tSionnaigh) surname. The confusion is understandable as the Tinney surname is pronounced 'Tunny' in Donegal.


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Paul Kelly
post 3rd Aug 2007, 06:10pm
Post #171


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Hi Ron.

I have just been thinking about what you said in post #166. The following Scottish Catholic Gallowglass families all settled in County Antrim in the 14th, 15th and early 16th centuries: McDonnell (McDonald) from Kintyre and Islay in Argyll, McAllister (McAlister) from Kintyre in Argyll, McCoy (McKay) from Kintyre in Argyll, McNeill from Gigha and Colonsay in Argyll, McDowell (McDougall) from Lorn/Lorne in Argyll and McAuley (McAulay) from Islay in southern Argyll. In addition, Scottish Protestant Planter families with the same 6 surnames also settled in County Antrim in the 17th century.


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Paul Kelly
post 4th Aug 2007, 11:40am
Post #172


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I could have also included the McClean (McLean) surname in my last post but it is not nearly as numerous in County Antrim as the other 6 surnames listed above. A few McClean Galloglasses from the Isle of Mull in northern Argyll are said to have settled in Ulster in the 15th or early 16th century. However, the vast majority of McCleans (McLeans) in Antrim (and Ulster in general) are descendants of 17th century Scottish Planters.


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RonD
post 4th Aug 2007, 12:38pm
Post #173


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My great great grandmother was McDonald and her mother was and Ogilvie. Not sure where they originated suppose it was County Down My gg grandmother married a Brown from County Down who were in Scotland pre famine 1847-48. I surmised County Down from a a census report from his sister. From marriages of siblings it appears they were protestants, Maria Brown my great grandmother married my great grandfather Dempsey in a Catholic ceremony.


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Paul Kelly
post 5th Aug 2007, 08:54am
Post #174


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McKeever is a native Irish surname originating in west Ulster. McKeever is common in Tyrone and Derry and the spelling McGeever is common in Donegal. McIvor is an unrelated Scottish surname and has origins in more than one part of Scotland. There has been some intermingling of the Irish McKeever and Scottish McIvor surnames, particularly in Ulster.


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Paul Kelly
post 5th Aug 2007, 09:52am
Post #175


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The following surnames are all commonly found in Ulster and I have discussed them in previous posts: McHugh/McCue, McCoy/McKay, McKee and McGee/Magee. These surnames are often confused with one another and I would like to clarify a few things.

The McHugh/McCue surname is a native Irish surname originating in west Ulster and is common in County Donegal.

The McCoy/McKay surname is commonly found in east Ulster, particularly County Antrim. Some of the Ulster McCoys/McKays are descendants of 15th century Scottish Catholic McKay Galloglasses from Kintyre and Islay while the other Ulster McCoys/McKays are mainly descendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant McKay Planters from Kintyre. McCoy is the Irish spelling of the Scottish surname McKay and both forms of the surname are found in Ulster.

The McKee surname is commonly found in east Ulster, particularly Counties Down and Armagh. The Ulster McKees are mainly descendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant McKie Planters from Dumfries and Galloway. McKee is the Irish spelling of the Scottish surname McKie which originates in Galloway.

The McGee/Magee surname is common in both east and west Ulster. The McGee family of west Ulster (Donegal, Tyrone and Fermanagh) is a native Irish family. The Magees of east Ulster (Antrim and Down) are mainly descendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant McGhee Planters from Ayrshire and Galloway. McGhee is a Scottish surname originating in Galloway. The McGhee and McKie families of Galloway are said to be related.

Most of the 19th century Irish McCoy and McGee/Magee immigrants to Scotland had their surnames recorded in the Scottish forms of McKay and McGhee.

There has been some intermingling of all the above surnames because of the many movements of families between Scotland and Ireland.


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petalpeeps
post 7th Aug 2007, 03:50pm
Post #176


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my husbands family originate from ireland, our name is mcdonnell often confused with mcdonald
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*peter patten*
post 8th Aug 2007, 03:18am
Post #177






QUOTE (Paul Kelly @ 26th Sep 2006, 06:04 AM) *
Campbell, Murray, Morrison and Patton/Patten are Scottish surnames and there are people in Ulster today with these surnames who are descendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant Planters.

However, there were native Catholic Irish families in west Ulster - Donegal, Derry and Tyrone - who adopted these 4 surnames as the Anglicized versions of their Gaelic surnames shortly after the Plantation. Today, there are famous Catholic Irish families in Donegal and Tyrone with these surnames. In addition, some of the Catholic Campbells in Donegal are descendants of 14th century Scottish Gallowglasses. Campbell is a very common surname in County Donegal.
(See my discussion of Gallowglass families under the topic 'Are the Scots Really Irish?' in this 'Family History' forum.)

As a result, a significant minority of the Campbells, Murrays, Morrisons and Pattons in Scotland today are descendants of 19th century Catholic Irish immigrants from west Ulster, particularly in the Glasgow area.

well explained Paul, but hard for some to fathom. I knew an Irish Patton of Planter stock who thought the idea of a native Irish Patton sept was just a ploy to sell coats of arms to Yanks!?
At that point, I gave up on my explanation.
Best Regards,
Peter Patten
Vermont
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Paul Kelly
post 8th Aug 2007, 09:02am
Post #178


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There are at least 4 sources for the McDonnell surname in Ireland. There is a native Gaelic Irish McDonnell family originating in Clare/Limerick in the Provinve of Munster in the south west of Ireland. There is another native Gaelic Irish McDonnell family originating in Fermanagh/Monaghan in south west Ulster. There is a large McDonnell family in north east Ulster who are descendants of Scottish Catholic McDonald Galloglasses who moved from Kintyre and Islay in southern Argyll to the Glens of Antrim in the 14th century. There is also a large McDonnell family in County Mayo in the Province of Connacht in the west of Ireland who are also descendants of 14th/15th century Scottish Catholic McDonald Gallowglasses from southern Argyll. Some McDonnell Galloglasses are even said to have settled in the Province of Leinster in the south east of Ireland. In fact, the majority of McDonnells in Ireland are descendants of 14th/15th Scottish Catholic McDonald Galloglasses from Kintyre and Islay. Finally, some McDonnells in Ulster (and in Ireland in general) are desecendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant McDonald Planters, though some of the McDonald Planters continued to use the Scottish spelling 'McDonald'. Furthermore, a few native and Galloglas Irish McDonnell families have adopted the Scottish spelling 'McDonald' at various times when they thought it was advantageous to have a Scottish surname. Lastly, there is the native Gaelic Irish O'Donnell family from County Donegal who are not related to any of the above McDonnell families.


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Paul Kelly
post 8th Aug 2007, 12:16pm
Post #179


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Continuing with my last post, McConnell is a Scottish surname long associated with Ayrshire. Most of the McConnells in Ulster today are descendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant Planters from Ayrshire. However, it seems likely that a few of the McConnells in Ulster are descended from Gallowglass and native Irish McDonnell families who adopted the McConnell surname in the years following the Plantation of Ulster when they thought it was advantageous to do so.

O'Connell, Connelly, Connolly and Donnelly are all native Irish surnames associated with Kerry, Galway, Monaghan and Tyrone respectively.


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Paul Kelly
post 9th Aug 2007, 07:16am
Post #180


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Hi Peter.

I have just noticed your post. There was a Patten/Patton Planter family in Donegal and they were either of southern Scottish or northern English extraction. However, there was also a native Irish Patten/Patton family from the Ballybofey area in the parish of Stranorlar in southeast Donegal. The original Irish Gaelic form of this surname was O'Peatain and it was Anglicised as Patten/Patton in the years following the Plantation of Ulster. 2 of the younger brothers of my greatgrandfather - Hugh Kelly - married 2 Patten/Patton sisters from Lettermore, near Drumkeen, in the Donegal parish of Convoy (Post #64). Lettermore is just a few miles to the north of the town of Ballybofey. I understand that there was also a small O'Peatain family in County Mayo who also Anglicised their surname as Patten/Patton.

Another Scottish Planter surname that was adopted by a native Irish family from the Ballybofey area in Donegal was Houston or Huston. The original Irish Gaelic form of this native Donegal family's surname was
Mac Giolla tSeachlainn or MacGiollatSeachlainn. One of my greatgreatgrandmothers was a Mary Bridget Houston/Huston from Magheravall, Convoy, Donegal. Lettermore and Magheravall are neighbouring villages near Drumkeen in the parish of Convoy, Donegal.

Paul


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