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> Knightswood Hospital - Second World War, Do you have any Memories
Tassie
post 12th Feb 2006, 09:42am
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Hi. I'm a Tasmanian (That is from the Isle down under Mainland Australia) and have just been given 2 photographs details as follows. #1. on the reverse it has [Knightswood Hospital Glasgow Aug 1940]. It is of eight Australian soldiers in company with ten Nurses. #2 Is of four of the nurses with with the caption [Nurse marked X sent me the photos Glasgow Aug 1940]. The photos are taken against a brick building which is heavily sandbagged and appears to have wooden slats across the windows. They would have been sent to my half-brother George who was KIA in Tobruk Sept the next year and I beleive he sent them on to the family back home. The photo of the group of four is of extremely good quality and I am sure someone would recognise them. As I wasn't born until after my brothers death I would love to know more about this hospital and Glasgow in 1940 and especially about the photo. Is it appropriate to post the photo on the site? --- Tassie
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GG
post 12th Feb 2006, 10:53am
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Hi Tassie, welcome to the GGBB!

Yes, please do post the photograph (using the attachment option available below; you can only attach one file per post, so if you wish to post both just post twice). Hopefully we'll be able to supply you with some information about the hospital. I was sorry to hear about George - my grandfather fought in North Africa also at that time and we were very fortunate that he made it home. Just yesterday, my niece and I were going through his medals and, when she asked about them, I explained to her the great sacrifice made at that time, when only men like George and the other soldiers, sailors and airmen of the Bristish Empire, stood between the Axis powers and what would have been a horrific victory.

GG.


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Tassie
post 12th Feb 2006, 11:27am
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Hi GG
Many thanks for your fast response to my posting. I'm not new to computers but new to BB's and to receive a quick response such as yours was just mindboggling.
I have had some of George's letters home for some time and in a letter dated 31st Aug 1940 he indicates that he along with several others in his group were in hospital. As family historian I was given the photos yesterday by my only surviving brother now 84 and I came home and started thinking what I could find out about them.. So here I am. I will only put the one on line for the moment as it has the best detail for the given file size. The other is rather spoiled in that the soldiers are all wearing hats and it is difficult to recognise faces. When I have a few moments I will transcribe a few pieces from the letters that may be of interest.

Thanks Tassie.
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clapton
post 12th Feb 2006, 02:06pm
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Hi Tassie..
Knightswood Hospital eventually became more of a "Geriatric Hospital.. It was demolished some years ago.. The buildings on the distant left of this photo are what now occupies the ground.. Built within the last 6-years

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Tassie
post 12th Feb 2006, 11:04pm
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Hi Lord Provost
Thanks for the photo. It appears to be a beautiful street. I tried to upload one the photos that I had on the last message but It would appear that I failed. I had read a bit about it becoming a Geriatric Hospital on another site related to one of the churches. I will have another go at uploading the photo and see what happens. The nurse second from left sent this photo to George
Tassie

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clapton
post 12th Feb 2006, 11:55pm
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Considering the age of the photo. It is really very clear..
My mother-in-law was one of the "Cleaners" in the Hospital.. I live just round the corner from it.. (or where it was).. .. Directly across fom it is a Fire station.. and School.. and.. a Driving Test Centre... Ironically. there is also a Speed Camera..

The Hospital mainly consisted of "one-storey" annexe type buildings
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Tassie
post 13th Feb 2006, 02:09am
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Hi Clapton.
Sorry I addressed you as Lord Provost in the last. Yes the clarity is quite good. Unfortunately the one attached to this posting is not quite so good. Because of the shading given by the hats of the soldiers it is difficult to recognise them. The nurses are clear and I assume that the lady in the back row second from left is the Matron of the hospital (The different headwear). The sandbagging etc. is quite extensive isn't it. --- Tassie

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clapton
post 13th Feb 2006, 12:04pm
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Hi tassie..
When you consider that the Hospital is actually less than a 10-minute drive from Clydebank.. and that Clydebank was heavily bombed during the war.. You can understand the "Heavy" sandbagging...... A few bombs did land in Knightswood... One of them.. just along the road at Bankhead School..

http://www.theclydebankstory.com/story_TCSB01.php

I have tried to obtain photos of Knightswood Hospital.. but as of yet.. I can't find any.. The hospital closed in 1990
However... this photo is of Knightswood Road.... which ran from Anniesland Road up to Knightswood Cross..
If you look at the first photo I posted here.. with the "New Houses".. They are on Anniesland Road.. Knightswood Road is at the far end of those houses.. The main Entrance to the hospital was in this road..
The wall on the left.. in the old photo.. posted here is.. the wall that surrounded the hospital.. It looks like the photographer would have been standing just outside the entrance.
Part of the wall is still standing now..
This was photo was taken in 1925.. and by 1940.. a great deal more houses had been built in the distance



This post has been edited by clapton: 13th Feb 2006, 12:39pm
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Tassie
post 15th Feb 2006, 12:08pm
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Hi Again Clapton
Thanks for the last. I have only just had time to respond as I have been away. I have read the Clydebank story you pointed to. To think that this story was repeated all over Britain is horrendous. As I indicated on my first posting I wasn't born until after George's death so my own memories are rather limited. I can remember some stories about rationing, blackout and I can remember where the shelter trenches were at my school but that is about all. WW2 was taught when I went to school but it wasn't until 1996 when my wife and I spent 7 months caravanning around Mainland Australia that we found just how much we didn't know about the war as it applied to Australia itself.
Evidence of airstrips, and roads 100's of miles long that had been hastily built to aid the war effort and the extensive military complex that was set up on the northern coast of Australia is still there. In and around Darwin old military installations still stand and there are several places where one can see photographic and some physical evidence of the damage that the area incurred. Of course we didn't suffer the same civilian casualties that the Great Britain did. I am hoping to get some more detail about George's visit to Scotland in a few weeks time.
Tassie
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Wee Annie
post 16th Mar 2006, 07:37pm
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I hope I'm not changing the subject here, but does any one remember Stobhill hospital. It was evacuated during the blitz when I was just a wee thing.they kept us there for { where ever their was } 3 yrs because they could'nt find bananas any where in Glasgow .I do have some memories of that time , I know it was very hard on all. Just one more thing are there any banana babys out their I would like to talk with you Wee Annie


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Tassie
post 3rd May 2006, 01:09pm
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Hello again. In making the original posting to this forum, I had I suppose some hope that somebody would recognise one of the people in the photographs. Of course one has to remember that many of those that appear in the photographs if they are still alive would be in excess of 80 years of age. As many of you probably know, in Australia and New Zealand we recognise April the 25th as Anzac Day, a day when we remember the fallen of World Wars I and II and those other conflicts that have involved servicemen from the two countries. Both George and I were raised in the small town of Winnaleah which is about 25 miles from Scottsdale and boasts a population of probably less than 200 people. The town has a memorial to the fallen of the two World Wars and honours four men from the First World War and just one (my half brother George) from the Second World War. With a lack of returned servicemen still alive in the area and considering that George is named on the memorial I was this year asked to conduct the Dawn Service. I was most honoured to address approximately 70 people who had gathered in the pre-dawn darkness to remember those who had given their lives that we might live the freedom which we today enjoy. Only some 15 miles away at 8:30 am about 300 people gathered at a refurbished Memorial in the even smaller town of Legerwood. This rather unique memorial is featured on an Internet site which I suggest you might like to look at [URL=http://www.dorsetonline.org.au/trees.htm]
The site details the history of the memorial and its individuality.. If you want to know more about this area of the world follow some of the links on the page.
Tassie
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dugald
post 4th May 2006, 12:20am
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Hello Tassie: I have followed your postings regarding the Aussie soldiers hospitalised in Knightswood during WWII with some interest. I can understand your wish to learn a bit more about your brother George's sojourn in Scotland, especially after him losing his life the following year at Tobruk; but as you mention, the chances of someone recognizing one of them is pretty remote... yes, the Aussies among them would indeed appear somewhat different from the photographs, but it was worth a try.

I can imagine your feelings at having conducted the service at the Anzac Memorial in Winnaleah in recognition of this year's Anzac Day. It was certainly an honour for you to perform the service, deservedly so, as the sister of an Australian soldier who died at Tobruk. When I was at school in Govan, Glasgow, during the war, I remember being at an Armistice Day service in the school, and wishing, somewhat enviously, I had been the student who had the privilege of providing a prepared address as part of the service. He was one of the senior students in the school and did an excellent job while I, one of the junior students, could but stand and listen... with I'd guess, a wide open mouth. Being recognized as you were, is no small achievement Tassie... Good on you!... as they say in Australia.

I thank you for sending the website regarding the service at Legerwood. I think I'd rather have attended your service at Winnaleah rather than, the apparently more popular one, at Legerwood. I had a look at the Lagerwood website . The Legerwood memorial was a brilliant idea-- to remember the dead by means of something living was not only a novel idea, but a very meaningful one too.... I'm speaking of the original memorial Tassie, the tall beautiful flourishing living trees, not of the dead sculptured ones.

If the purpose of congregating is to admire the spectacular work of an artist, and there is no doubt the artistic work is worthy of the highest praise, then by all means Lagerwood would have been the place to go. No, I'm not a 'tree-hugger', not by any means, I've hacked and burnt many of them. I just can't seem to reconcile killing trees that had served as a memorial for such a long time, and represented at the time of planting, the wish of the surviving friends and relatives of the dead, then replacing them with dead sculptured stumps...

Let me say in closing Tassie, that a visit to admire the artistic work in Lagerwood would certainly be worthwhile, but as a war memorial I'd have much preferred to have joined the other 70 people in Winnaleah who had gathered in the pre-dawn darkness simply to join you in remembering.

Cheers, Dugald.
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glasgowken
post 14th Apr 2007, 06:05pm
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Bit late, but I thought this may be of interest. Knightswood Hospital, early 1960's.

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elle
post 16th Apr 2007, 06:15am
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QUOTE (clapton @ 12th Feb 2006, 11:55 PM) *
Considering the age of the photo. It is really very clear..
My mother-in-law was one of the "Cleaners" in the Hospital.. I live just round the corner from it.. (or where it was).. .. Directly across fom it is a Fire station.. and School.. and.. a Driving Test Centre... Ironically. there is also a Speed Camera..

The Hospital mainly consisted of "one-storey" annexe type buildings


We moved to Hermitage Avenue, Knightswood, four years after WWII, and our back garden looked on to the Knightswood Hospital. It was a lovely area. Thank you for those beautiful photos Tassie.

It was quite a difference living in Knightswood, from Maryhill. It was wonderful not having to get out of bed for the air raids. Living in Knightswod was like living in the country after WWII.
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elle
post 16th Apr 2007, 06:21am
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QUOTE (Wee Annie @ 16th Mar 2006, 07:37 PM) *
I hope I'm not changing the subject here, but does any one remember Stobhill hospital. It was evacuated during the blitz when I was just a wee thing.they kept us there for { where ever their was } 3 yrs because they could'nt find bananas any where in Glasgow .I do have some memories of that time , I know it was very hard on all. Just one more thing are there any banana babys out their I would like to talk with you Wee Annie


I never heard this story, Annie. about banana babies (?). smile.gif It's a new one for me. I have heard of Stobhill Hospital, but I don't remember exactly where that was (?). I have been away from Glasgow since 1958, and later emigrated to Canada in 1966. I still have family living in Knightswood.
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