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> Three For A Tenner, The end of drink deals
ashfield
post 22nd Dec 2011, 09:51pm
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Ross, it's always difficult to recommend because much depends on time and taste. If somene was just starting to experiment I would steer them to the Speyside malts like Macallan, Glenfarclas or Cardhu. Further north there are good lighter malts, like Dalwhinnie or Strathisla. As for the islands, I would most likely kill for a Bunnahabhain from Islay or Highland Park for Orkney. Only as starting points you understand laugh.gif

Oh and I would steer clear of "special editions" or "done in a xxxx cask" rolleyes.gif


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pumps100
post 23rd Dec 2011, 02:01pm
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QUOTE (ashfield @ 22nd Dec 2011, 09:53pm) *
Ross, it's always difficult to recommend because much depends on time and taste. If somene was just starting to experiment I would steer them to the Speyside malts like Macallan, Glenfarclas or Cardhu. Further north there are good lighter malts, like Dalwhinnie or Strathisla. As for the islands, I would most likely kill for a Bunnahabhain from Islay or Highland Park for Orkney. Only as starting points you understand laugh.gif

Oh and I would steer clear of "special editions" or "done in a xxxx cask" rolleyes.gif


Sage advice and I agree with you. I've had an odd experience. I used to drink on occasion the proprietary blended whisky The Famous Grouse (biggest selling blended whisky is Scotland), and if overseas J & B or Dewars White Label. All bog standard blended whisky's.

But about ten years or so my sister-in-law used to get me some malt whisky for birthdays and Christmas and I acquired a taste for malt in preference to blended whisky but I could drink either.

Earlier this year I saw a promotion in Tesco - a litre bottle of Grouse for £15 if you spent so much. I bought it. I had a glass - it was quite terrible and I could not drink it. I could not believe it my taste had changed so much. I gave it away.

Regards

Ian
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bilbo.s
post 23rd Dec 2011, 02:47pm
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Aye, young Ross really jumped in at rhe deep end with an Islay malt. It´s amazing how the palate changes over the years, as you say, Ian. I well remember my first Laphroaig and Talisker and it was only 15 years ago - I thought it was something from the chemist´s shop. Still not daft on Glenmorangie - my first impression was that the glass was tainted, and I still find it a bit flowery.
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Dave Grieve
post 23rd Dec 2011, 04:01pm
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QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 23rd Dec 2011, 02:49pm) *
Aye, young Ross really jumped in at rhe deep end with an Islay malt. It&acute;s amazing how the palate changes over the years, as you say, Ian. I well remember my first Laphroaig and Talisker and it was only 15 years ago - I thought it was something from the chemist&acute;s shop. Still not daft on Glenmorangie - my first impression was that the glass was tainted, and I still find it a bit flowery.


Dont say that about Glenmorangie please Bilbo, I dont drink whisky and thought I was buying something special for my son in-law this christmas. laugh.gif
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pumps100
post 23rd Dec 2011, 05:46pm
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QUOTE (Dave Grieve @ 23rd Dec 2011, 04:03pm) *
Dont say that about Glenmorangie please Bilbo, I dont drink whisky and thought I was buying something special for my son in-law this christmas. laugh.gif


Dave,

Don't worry what Bilbo says. His taste buds have been obviously dulled by the Queen Margot blend ex Lidl. Glenmorangie is one of my favourites. I bought myself a bottle for Christmas this year (£20 ex Tesco). I've had one dram out of it so far (honest!).

Regards

Ian
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ashfield
post 23rd Dec 2011, 07:54pm
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I don't mind Glenmorangie either, for my money there isn't a bad malt (now that Auchentoshan have sorted themselves out rolleyes.gif ), some are just better than others. My least favourite would probably be Glenfiddoch, just can't see the appeal except that it so lacks flavour to be inoffensive. I am also happy to indulge in a blend, currently I get the "Highland Black", 8yo from Aldi which I drink straight. My worst nightmare is being invited into a neighbours for a drink, he mixes cola into his whisky so buys the cheapest supermarket blend available. Not nice at all.

About thirty years ago I was on holiday in a place called St Agnes in Cornwall. I was in the local hotel and asked for a Glenmorangie using what I believe is the correct pronunciation (to rhyme with orangy). The owner asked me which was right and I spent a few minutes explaining the debate and why I had used this version. Just at that point there was a Scottish voice right behind me and he called to the barman, Two Glen-mo-ran-gees Jimmy, the owner took one look at me, shook his head and walked away rolleyes.gif


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beth
post 23rd Dec 2011, 08:11pm
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Dave, over here, it is a good whisky
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pumps100
post 12th Jan 2012, 02:51pm
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With Christmas and the New Year over many people, including myself, may be having a rather abstemious start to the year - in penance for over indulging during the holiday period. During these dark and dry evenings I got to thinking about the Scottish governments Alcohol (Minimum Pricing) Scotland Bill.

I know this may sound terribly dull, but I would ask that you stick with me as I have a confession to make. We all know about the terrible statistics; numbers of alcohol related deaths, A & E visits, ill health, and the social and economic consequences for communities and families. It is a major problem, and unlike Westminster the Scottish government is actually trying to do something to combat the alcohol problem is society

Having been previously been against the 'Minimum Pricing' concept – more with regard to thinking that it is not the State's job to interfere in such matters – I have to confess that, after reading up on it, I now believe that the Scottish Government may be on to something in relation to controlling alcohol sales from a public health perspective. If you can recall it was Scotland which was one of the first to introduce the ban in smoking in public places – many other jurisdictions followed on including England.

Quite a lot has already happened in Scotland. Changes in Licensing laws, and ending two-for-one and similar cut-price deals based on quantity. But many believe this does not go far enough considering the extent of the problem. The Scottish parliament failed to get 'Minimum Pricing' introduced last time round but they will most probably try again as there is now a majority in the parliament.

There is ample evidence going back to the days of Hogarth's 'mother's ruin' gin times, when the streets of London were awash with cheap gin, regarding the effect of pricing as a control on alcohol consumption. I used to scoff at this idea, but now I accept that the common sense logic, in that if you increase prices alcohol consumption goes down. And if you could target certain types of drink even better.

Canada has had minimum pricing in one form or another for over twenty years. Each province has its own variants of the minimum pricing model, and some have evolved into quite sophisticated control measures e.g. beers 4% ABV and under taxed less; high ABV taxed more, indexation of minimum alcohol price.

I don't think Scotland's Minimum Pricing mechanism will be all that complex. They simply want a minimum price per unit of alcohol to be established. They have not said what the unit price would be but it is generally thought to be 45p. It is not until you do the sums that you see how effective this simple measure would be – to target high alcohol content/low priced products. It would have little effect, if any, on a bottle of wine, bottle of branded spirits, 4 cans of Tennents, and similar.

The supermarkets are against minimum pricing because it will effectively kill off their own branded 'value' items e.g. 2 litres of 'value' cider at £1.69 would be £6.84 under minimum pricing; 'Value' vodka current cost £9.29 would increase to £12.65 – you can get Glens for this!

The alcohol industry will of course be against the principle of minimum pricing as it flags up the clear message from the government that like tobacco, alcohol can actually be harmful to you.

I've done some sums which I think help to add clarity to the issue of minimum pricing (at 45p).

4 cans of 440ml 5% beer. Units: 8.8 – MP cost £3.96 – Actual cost £4 so no change/effect
1 bottle wine 750ml 13%. Units: 9.75 – MP cost £4.39 – Actual cost c. £4.49 so no change/effect
1 bottle Bells 750ml 40%. . Units: 30 – MP cost £13.50 – Actual about the same so no change/effect
4 cans of 440ml 5% beer. Units: 8.8 – MP cost £3.96 – Actual cost £4 so no change/effect

4 cans of 568ml 5.3% cider. Units: 12 – MP cost £5.40 – Actual Coop cost £4 so would change
1 bottle Tesco Vodka 700ml. Units: 28 – MP cost £12.65 – Actual cost £9.29 so would change
1 bottle (2L) Tesco 'value' cider. Units: 15.2 – MP cost £6.84 – Actual cost £1.69 so would change

I regret to say that Buckfast would NOT be affected due to minimum pricing at a the proposed flat rate of 45p. The minimum price would be £5 whereas I understand it currently costs nearer £6 so would not change.

Sorry to drone on for so long but I felt it was important to share with you my conversion after having done the sums.

Regards

Ian
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bilbo.s
post 12th Jan 2012, 03:17pm
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QUOTE (pumps100 @ 23rd Dec 2011, 05:45pm) *
Dave,

Don't worry what Bilbo says. His taste buds have been obviously dulled by the Queen Margot blend ex Lidl. Glenmorangie is one of my favourites. I bought myself a bottle for Christmas this year (£20 ex Tesco). I've had one dram out of it so far (honest!).

Regards

Ian



Nothing wrong with Queen Margot, especially at the price I get it haha. I have an unopened bottle of Morangie - special Centennial edition, which I received on my retirement. It will be interesting to see how it compares to the normal one, which I did not intend to denigrate- but it is not one of my favourites although a bit better than Fiddich. Is it not interesting how Glenfiddich is the biggest seller globally, as is JW Red Label among the blends. Clearly a victory for marketing and having a differently shaped bottle !

Talking of blends, I am quite keen on the Black Grouse- but then it does seem to have a good deal of island malt,
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pumps100
post 25th Mar 2012, 07:58pm
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QUOTE (pumps100 @ 12th Jan 2012, 03:39pm) *
With Christmas and the New Year over many people, including myself, may be having a rather abstemious start to the year - in penance for over indulging during the holiday period. During these dark and dry evenings I got to thinking about the Scottish governments Alcohol (Minimum Pricing) Scotland Bill.

I know this may sound terribly dull, but I would ask that you stick with me as I have a confession to make. We all know about the terrible statistics; numbers of alcohol related deaths, A & E visits, ill health, and the social and economic consequences for communities and families. It is a major problem, and unlike Westminster the Scottish government is actually trying to do something to combat the alcohol problem is society

Having been previously been against the 'Minimum Pricing' concept – more with regard to thinking that it is not the State's job to interfere in such matters – I have to confess that, after reading up on it, I now believe that the Scottish Government may be on to something in relation to controlling alcohol sales from a public health perspective. If you can recall it was Scotland which was one of the first to introduce the ban in smoking in public places – many other jurisdictions followed on including England.

Quite a lot has already happened in Scotland. Changes in Licensing laws, and ending two-for-one and similar cut-price deals based on quantity. But many believe this does not go far enough considering the extent of the problem. The Scottish parliament failed to get 'Minimum Pricing' introduced last time round but they will most probably try again as there is now a majority in the parliament.

There is ample evidence going back to the days of Hogarth's 'mother's ruin' gin times, when the streets of London were awash with cheap gin, regarding the effect of pricing as a control on alcohol consumption. I used to scoff at this idea, but now I accept that the common sense logic, in that if you increase prices alcohol consumption goes down. And if you could target certain types of drink even better.

Canada has had minimum pricing in one form or another for over twenty years. Each province has its own variants of the minimum pricing model, and some have evolved into quite sophisticated control measures e.g. beers 4% ABV and under taxed less; high ABV taxed more, indexation of minimum alcohol price.

I don't think Scotland's Minimum Pricing mechanism will be all that complex. They simply want a minimum price per unit of alcohol to be established. They have not said what the unit price would be but it is generally thought to be 45p. It is not until you do the sums that you see how effective this simple measure would be – to target high alcohol content/low priced products. It would have little effect, if any, on a bottle of wine, bottle of branded spirits, 4 cans of Tennents, and similar.

The supermarkets are against minimum pricing because it will effectively kill off their own branded 'value' items e.g. 2 litres of 'value' cider at £1.69 would be £6.84 under minimum pricing; 'Value' vodka current cost £9.29 would increase to £12.65 – you can get Glens for this!

The alcohol industry will of course be against the principle of minimum pricing as it flags up the clear message from the government that like tobacco, alcohol can actually be harmful to you.

I've done some sums which I think help to add clarity to the issue of minimum pricing (at 45p).

4 cans of 440ml 5% beer. Units: 8.8 – MP cost £3.96 – Actual cost £4 so no change/effect
1 bottle wine 750ml 13%. Units: 9.75 – MP cost £4.39 – Actual cost c. £4.49 so no change/effect
1 bottle Bells 750ml 40%. . Units: 30 – MP cost £13.50 – Actual about the same so no change/effect
4 cans of 440ml 5% beer. Units: 8.8 – MP cost £3.96 – Actual cost £4 so no change/effect

4 cans of 568ml 5.3% cider. Units: 12 – MP cost £5.40 – Actual Coop cost £4 so would change
1 bottle Tesco Vodka 700ml. Units: 28 – MP cost £12.65 – Actual cost £9.29 so would change
1 bottle (2L) Tesco 'value' cider. Units: 15.2 – MP cost £6.84 – Actual cost £1.69 so would change

I regret to say that Buckfast would NOT be affected due to minimum pricing at a the proposed flat rate of 45p. The minimum price would be £5 whereas I understand it currently costs nearer £6 so would not change.

Sorry to drone on for so long but I felt it was important to share with you my conversion after having done the sums.

Regards

Ian

Sorry to quote my own quote but I see that the Boy David Cameron has latched onto the Scottish Governments alcohol strategy. The Sensational Alex Salmond band should be charging them a commission for stealing the ideas. The English government is pitching the minimum price at 40p per unit which will have little effect - 45p/unit is in the right order of things.

Regards

Ian
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irrie
post 26th Mar 2012, 07:06am
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Politicians can blether on about minimum pricing all they like. In my opinion it just wont work if the intention is to cut down on youth drinking. Cheers
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bilbo.s
post 26th Mar 2012, 08:13am
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QUOTE (irrie @ 26th Mar 2012, 07:54am) *
Politicians can blether on about minimum pricing all they like. In my opinion it just wont work if the intention is to cut down on youth drinking. Cheers



Dead right !
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pumps100
post 26th Mar 2012, 01:18pm
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If we can rid the supermarket shelves of cheap cider and own label spirits it'll be a start in the right direction.

Minimum pricing will do this quite simply. Your Asbo types will not be inclined to pay almost £7 for 2 litres of Tesco cider that previously cost them £1.69.

Every little bit helps.

Regards

Ian
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pumps100
post 31st Mar 2012, 09:52am
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Morrisons - 25% off any six bottles of wine

Discounted wine deals have been difficult to find these days - the last time Tesco had a 25% 'flash' sale on six bottles of wine was last November. Three for £12 deals have all but vanished replaced with Two for £12. Wolf Blass 'Yellow Label' Cabernet Sauvignon is on sale almost everywhere at £9.49 - £9.99 which is far too dear for something you could get previously for £5-£6 on a deal. I've got a big empty and sad looking wine rack with only four special bottles left!

Things are getting tough.

However,help is at hand, as Morrisons have a 25% promotion this weekend based on buying six bottles of wine; if you mix this deal with some of the allegedly half price offers you could end up getting something half decent for under £4 - this is as rare as hens teeth these days. This offer is not valid in Scotland.

Happy Easter!

Regards

Ian

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bilbo.s
post 31st Mar 2012, 09:56am
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You´ll just have to move here, Ian. rolleyes.gif
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