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> Bridgeton
dizzybint
post 20th Oct 2010, 05:21pm
Post #16

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QUOTE (*Ben Aligan 3* @ 13th Aug 2010, 11:46pm) *
I grew up in Madras St. in the early 1950's and went to John St Primary (my ma thought it was posher than the local Rumford St Primary) and went on to attend John St Secondary (the old building). There was still an air-raid shelter in Madras St when I was wee and we used to dare each other to run through it. There was a mill up a wee lane that made some kind of linen material (maybe madras cloth...maybe that's how the street got its name...because it used to be called Scott St). At the other end of Madras St. was Mill St. with McPhun's saw mill, which used to sound its hooter every weeknight at 5pm. In the Main St there was a wee bakery (you went through a close into a back court) and late at night there would be a big queue of people waiting to buy bags of hot rolls fresh from the oven. There was the 'Wee Dan Doyle'...The Wee Royal...a flea-pit of a cimema in the Main St where you could get in for sixpence and a couple of jam-jars. The Kings picture hall was in James St (near the Greenhead St end) and the Olympia picture hall was at Brigton Cross (this was the posh cinema and had draped silken curtains that came down over the screen). My grandfather kept a large model sailboat in a special lock-up in the Richmond Park and I went with him to sail it on the pond. I remember standing on Shawfield Bridge watching a triumphant Clyde football team coming over the bridge in an open-topped double decker, after winning what I think must have been the Scottish Cup...the place was mobbed. The 'Penny Pony Man' used to come into the street with a pony and trap and charge us a penny for a ride. There were the back-court singers (after they'd sung, folk would open their windows and throw them out some money). Down and out men would often come come round the doors begging for food...my ma was a great one for giving them a bowl of home-made soup. The lamp-lighters would come round to light the stair-head gas lamps during the winter nights. I remember going with my brother to the local gas-works with a tin bath on wheels to collect char for the fire (this helped to supplement the coal).

aye I mind well the Clyde coming roon the Cross on an open top bus, was great... ah still live here, came back after thirty years in the wilderness.. aye the Olympia wiz a lovely hall, they should be ashamed at the state its been left in, but is to be reborn, sadly no as a picture hoose but as a state of the art library and sports facility for elite athletes, so at least it will be kept, I have photos of the Cross being done up from the start to finish if I can find out how to put them on...
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dizzybint
post 20th Oct 2010, 05:24pm
Post #17

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QUOTE (*Ben Aligan 3* @ 13th Aug 2010, 11:46pm) *
I grew up in Madras St. in the early 1950's and went to John St Primary (my ma thought it was posher than the local Rumford St Primary) and went on to attend John St Secondary (the old building). There was still an air-raid shelter in Madras St when I was wee and we used to dare each other to run through it. There was a mill up a wee lane that made some kind of linen material (maybe madras cloth...maybe that's how the street got its name...because it used to be called Scott St). At the other end of Madras St. was Mill St. with McPhun's saw mill, which used to sound its hooter every weeknight at 5pm. In the Main St there was a wee bakery (you went through a close into a back court) and late at night there would be a big queue of people waiting to buy bags of hot rolls fresh from the oven. There was the 'Wee Dan Doyle'...The Wee Royal...a flea-pit of a cimema in the Main St where you could get in for sixpence and a couple of jam-jars. The Kings picture hall was in James St (near the Greenhead St end) and the Olympia picture hall was at Brigton Cross (this was the posh cinema and had draped silken curtains that came down over the screen). My grandfather kept a large model sailboat in a special lock-up in the Richmond Park and I went with him to sail it on the pond. I remember standing on Shawfield Bridge watching a triumphant Clyde football team coming over the bridge in an open-topped double decker, after winning what I think must have been the Scottish Cup...the place was mobbed. The 'Penny Pony Man' used to come into the street with a pony and trap and charge us a penny for a ride. There were the back-court singers (after they'd sung, folk would open their windows and throw them out some money). Down and out men would often come come round the doors begging for food...my ma was a great one for giving them a bowl of home-made soup. The lamp-lighters would come round to light the stair-head gas lamps during the winter nights. I remember going with my brother to the local gas-works with a tin bath on wheels to collect char for the fire (this helped to supplement the coal).

aye I mind well the Clyde coming roon the Cross on an open top bus, was great... ah still live here, came back after thirty years in the wilderness.. aye the Olympia wiz a lovely hall, they should be ashamed at the state its been left in, but is to be reborn, sadly no as a picture hoose but as a state of the art library and sports facility for elite athletes, so at least it will be kept, I have photos of the Cross being done up from the start to finish if I can find out how to put them on...
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dizzybint
post 30th Oct 2010, 08:27am
Post #18

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**Angela**
post 8th Nov 2010, 01:00am
Post #19






Im looking for any info on my Gg grandpa's shop,which was in Bridgeton,possibly 1920's.It was Charlie Cater's shoe repairs,I believe he had more than one shop on Main st.I have one pic,but was looking for more.

tulip
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pumps100
post 22nd Dec 2010, 11:45pm
Post #20


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Glasgow City Council have produced (probably at great expense) a Heritage walk around Bridgeton. I have printed it out as it is most informative about the history of the area. It is really rather good.

http://www.glasgow.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/9B8...l_Bridgeton.pdf

The leaflet draws heavily on a book called 'Villages of Glasgow' which I managed to purchase after reading the leaflet.

Amongst interesting facts you will learn is that Bridgeton Cross is not actually in Bridgeton!

Regards

Ian
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messagelassie
post 25th Dec 2010, 04:50am
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my da's family came from Bridgeton his maw and da lived away up the very top of the main st I rem the walk when I was wee to get to there close thought we were never gonna make it lol and to top it off they lived on the top flat I rem the out side toilet and for years when u walked in to there room and kitchen when u come in the door it was like walking down a hill my bros and me used to roll our pocket money from the living room door to the fire place the building must have been sinking or summit they got moved down to the bottom end of main st new houses when they were emptying all the auld tenements I rem when we were wee and wanted oot to play they would say stay away from the clyde first thing we done as soon as we got out the door right down to it along the road was shawfield dugs rem my granda takeing me there and also rem getting lost in Richmond park and the police takeing me to his wee box at the cross and ma da turning up to get me funny when I left school 1974 I ended up working in Bridgeton in a place makeing school bags canny rem the name or street by that time they were pulling a lot of the houses down and I could take a short cut up to my grannys at lunch time and have my pices and tea 13 a week was my wage apprentice sewing machinist.
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Crewsy Fixer
post 26th Mar 2011, 06:49pm
Post #22

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I will hoist a flag in Bridgeton. Mothers parents Francis McDonald and Margaret McGinn came from Pentland Place and Megan St, Eventually moved to East Kilbride.
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isa
post 1st Aug 2011, 04:43pm
Post #23


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hello,
we are looking for a jessie mclaughlin from bridgeton who later became a mcdonald, or vice versa she was also known as ceelie, any info would be great, thankyou, x


--------------------
gonnae throw us doon a piece Ma
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taurus
post 26th May 2012, 06:08am
Post #24


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where are are all the Brigton folk? I can hardly believe there`s been no posting on this thread since last August.
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pumps100
post 26th May 2012, 12:51pm
Post #25


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I'll try to help you out with a long-distant memory?

Who remembers the doctors surgery of Dr Lawton the senior partner, and the younger Dr Quigley?

The surgery was towards the bottom of Main St on the left. You just turned up. Waiting room was always packed and the waiting time was often long. Dr Lawton was often remembered for being like Andrew Cruickshanks (Dr Cameron) in Dr Finlay's Casebook.

Regards

Ian
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Petrella
post 5th Jun 2012, 11:46am
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I was born and raised at 24 Kirkpatrick st.opposite "the geggie" premier picture house.the gents toilet was in the centre of the street with the police box at the right hand side.Sometime there was more entertainment in the street than there was in the geggie especially on a Saturday night when a wee drunk man would challenge two six foot policemen to a fight and get hauled off to the police box to await the black Maria the neighbours would come out in force and shout "leave the wee man alane he wisna'e daeing any thing"Lovely wee Mrs McBride and her daughter Aireen ran the dairy and wee Mrs Henderson had the sweet shop next door where you could buy rhubarb rock and two butter milk dainties for a penny the Elmslie family ran the fruit shop across the road so we were well provided for in our own wee street
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taurus
post 30th Jul 2012, 10:53am
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Just noticed your posting Petrella,I grew up in Marquis St,just a short hop across London Rd,and I almost lived in the Geggie al[ my young life,I loved the movies,Monday Tuesday then a different picture Wednesday Thurs and so on.In all these years I nevr really noticed one single shop in your street,I suppose because we had all that in our street plus the Co and Templetons and Cochranes. Great memories of childhood.
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dizzybint
post 30th Jul 2012, 10:56am
Post #28

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QUOTE (taurus @ 30th Jul 2012, 12:08pm) *
Just noticed your posting Petrella,I grew up in Marquis St,just a short hop across London Rd,and I almost lived in the Geggie al[ my young life,I loved the movies,Monday Tuesday then a different picture Wednesday Thurs and so on.In all these years I nevr really noticed one single shop in your street,I suppose because we had all that in our street plus the Co and Templetons and Cochranes. Great memories of childhood.

did you know the Howatts from Marquis st. my cousin Matt married Sheila Howatt back in the 50s
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taurus
post 30th Jul 2012, 11:01am
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Yes Sheila Howatt lived up the next close to me,a beautiful looking girl dressed like a fashion model. Is she still around do you know?
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*Guest*
post 19th Aug 2012, 08:33pm
Post #30






I found out more info on my gg grampa's shop.It was around in 1903,so,no one is alive now that can tell me anything lol! He was in partnership with someone else called Charlie Parker,they had two other shops and when they split the business,he took the Bridgeton shop and I think expanded the business.Chances are,there are no other pics around.
His daughters married a Marshall and a McCrossan and one of them lived across from the graveyard!

tulip
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