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Glasgow Boards/Forums _ Glasgow News Blog _ Glasgow Accent Sounds Most Stupid

Posted by: GG 1st Aug 2011, 09:58pm

Academic researchers from King's College London (KCL) have concluded that the Glasgow accent is one of the stupidest sounding accents in the UK. The researchers say that they have identified an "untainted snobbery" where owners of a Glaswegian accent are wrongly judged to be less capable because of their accents.

The findings indicate an enduring class prejudice where speakers with a 'posh' accent consistently look down on Glaswegians, rating people with a Glasgow accent lowest for traits like intelligence, competence, confidence and leadership.

Dr Julia Snell, a sociolinguistics lecturer, who led the latest research, said:

QUOTE
"While everyone judges people according to their speech these perceptions were usually based on social prejudices. What we find is that when people evaluate how we are speaking these are social, rather than linguistic, judgements."

The KCL academics also found similar negative associations with the Birmigham accent.


GG.

Posted by: Glasgow Girl 1st Aug 2011, 10:31pm

Never heard anything so ridiculous and I've never had a negative response to my Glaswegian accent. ohmy.gif

Posted by: benny 1st Aug 2011, 10:46pm

The problem is that there's nae such thing as "a Glasgow accent", really. There are Glasgow accents, rangin all the way frae panloaf Kelvinside tae gutter Govan, wi numerous shades in between. (Sorry, Govanites, nae offence intended. Jist a bitta alliteration. biggrin.gif )

Some Glesga accents approximate merr tae Standard English than others, so it's quite possible that some are greater objects of prejudice than others.

Posted by: Glasgow Girl 1st Aug 2011, 10:56pm

I'm a born and bred Govanite myself benny smile.gif

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 1st Aug 2011, 11:21pm

QUOTE (GG @ 1st Aug 2011, 10:44pm) *
The KCL academics also found similar negative associations with the Birmigham accent.


GG.

I voted yes ... but the only instance was in fact in Brumijum. rolleyes.gif laugh.gif

Posted by: *elaine24* 1st Aug 2011, 11:22pm

My husband, an edcuated highly experienced airline Captain, was told by his Chief Pilot that his Glagow accent may come accross as aggressive on the PA! (public address tannoy)

Posted by: farci 1st Aug 2011, 11:23pm

I'll see your Glesca accent and raise you a Brummie, GG. Selective quoting of the research may make for a bit fun but is hardly fair - or should that be 'ferr'?

The good Dr Snell also had a go at RP - or old-fashioned BBC - accents and was making a serious point about different accents being increasingly judged as right or wrong rather than just different.

It's only a few years ago that call centre operators sold the idea of Glasgow as a location based on research that

QUOTE
43 percent of respondents judged speakers of (Scottish) accents as likely to be successful; 40 percent found them hardworking and reliable
while trashing Scousers and Cockneys.

Those call centres came here and Glaswegians proved that they could talk clearly when it mattered. Just smile at the prejudices which probably result from knowledge of wir superior life style and kulchur biggrin.gif

Posted by: wee don 1st Aug 2011, 11:34pm

As ex radio operator with Royal Artillery I was always the chosen op because of the accent as most of the English accents were too varied.

regards Wee Don.

Posted by: grannymo 1st Aug 2011, 11:39pm

If you have what it takes to win and get on in life, you will do it no matter the accent. Look at Duncan Bannatyne or Anita Manning - never off the telly.

PS seen this?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-12398366

Posted by: Marje 1st Aug 2011, 11:44pm

During my working years as a PA/Secretary in New Zealand I found that my Glasgow accent was an open door to interesting conversations with all kinds of people from all walks of life. All loved the accent (except one Chinese client who complained that I didn't speak English). Most people wanted to talk of their Scottish ancestors, relatives-in-law, time spent there working, or touring Scotland during their UK trips. One of my colleagues said that she (as a Kiwi) never had such interesting conversations!

Posted by: jimmyd 1st Aug 2011, 11:50pm

I voted yes , but wish to point out , that the only people to "have a go " in a serious manner have been English.. others may take the proverbial, in a fun way.. I have found my accent to be an asset ,here in Oz. I have worked in many areas , and apart from one factory job , all have been involved with people . Most will say the love the accent .

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 1st Aug 2011, 11:58pm

I mentioned before on the boards here that I worked with a German guy in Hannover airport who picked out my Glasgow (not Scottish) accent when I was conversing in German with him.
He had worked at Glasgow airport for 12 years and said he'd have recognised the accent even if I'd been speakin' Chinese wi' him.
He loved the accent and had no bother understanding it at all.

Posted by: Robert Stewart 2nd Aug 2011, 12:24am

I work from home, mainly Internet but also often on the phone. I'm 'real Glesga'. Some people in the US told me I sounded like a 'film star' - I wondered what they were on but they seemed sincere. A Quebec/French woman said she could listen to my voice all day - don't know why. I try to be honest, sincere and straightforward and it has worked for me.
At other times the 'Glesga growl' has stopped a Lot of people from trying their luck with me, so it does come in handy. Only twice has someone pretended they didn't understand me so I said two wurrds to them - then I said 'how did you manage to understand that?!'
An Arab heard my voice one time, rushed over and started calling me 'Jimmy!', seems he had enjoyed working wi' Glesga guys.
Toronto is full of all nationalities and years ago they all seemed to understand. Nowadays with the young ones working and the Scots dying off (and not coming here or being let in) some of them just don't have a clue about what I'm saying.
It's my voice and I'm keeping it, I couldn't change it anyway. I sometimes have difficulty understanding the folk on Coronation Street and hate the edjimicated wallies who talk on TV about the 'next king of England' - if so, then let it be, the queen is a phony, there never has been a Queen Elizabeth I of Britain.

Posted by: klingon 2nd Aug 2011, 12:27am

I got the flipside of my Glasgow accent when I was fired from a bar job in Canada as they reckoned my Glasgow accent was to aggressive and scared the punters!-

Posted by: *George Brown* 2nd Aug 2011, 12:28am

Having seen and heard the effluent examples of typical life and language of London as portrayed in ''Eastenders''
enough said

Posted by: Hank Green 2nd Aug 2011, 12:36am

Although I have been away from Glasgow for many years I have never been encumbered with a typical Glasgow accent. I grew up in Whitecraigs but I attended University in/and played and frequented Glasgow venues and I do agree that there are accents in certain areas of the city which I have never found easy to understand. I have had first hand experience of prejudice when one of my friends at University had dificulty having his job applications accepted because he came from Gorbals and once my father had agreed to allow him to use our home address on his CV he soon found himself in demand. On a visit home from Canada along with my daughter she confessed that listening to some of the accents among sales clerks in Glasgow's stores left her wondering if it was really the English language she was listening to.

Posted by: Robert Stewart 2nd Aug 2011, 01:05am

>Scottish
Scots were found to have the most reassuring accents in Britain, in a recent survey. The Royal National Lifeboat Institution made the discovery in a poll asking which accent people found most soothing in emergencies, although the research did not delve into the numerous regional varieties of the Scottish tongue.

Check out:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/8187933/What-your-accent-says-about-you.html


Posted by: jamcat 2nd Aug 2011, 01:37am

I have had one or two comments from people saying they don't fully understand what i say, but when i worked in a call centre i was talking to people from all over the U.K. plus many other countries and was often told that they loved my accent.

Posted by: jamcat 2nd Aug 2011, 01:39am

QUOTE (Robert Stewart @ 2nd Aug 2011, 01:51am) *
>Scottish
Scots were found to have the most reassuring accents in Britain, in a recent survey. The Royal National Lifeboat Institution made the discovery in a poll asking which accent people found most soothing in emergencies, although the research did not delve into the numerous regional varieties of the Scottish tongue.

Check out:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/8187933/What-your-accent-says-about-you.html

I totally agree there Robert as many people especially those not from the UK love the Scottish accent.

Posted by: d.barber 2nd Aug 2011, 03:21am

Normally "speaking" I've no problems with accent. Most other people who have commented have said they like my accent.And on a few occasios I have been told I have a "nice"voice when on the phone. However When I was In the army I had my Corporal cook go to to some length to get me transferred.He was succesfull. Then there was a running battle I had with my Regimental Sergeant Major. I Once incorrectly carried out his cooking instructions and excused myself by saying I "misunderstood" him, he had a fit and went into a tirade about him speaking "The Queen's bloody English". This led to a month of severe retribution (another longer story)until he was stupid enough to berate and villify me in front of someone whom he thought was a "friend"I reported him to the Company Commander and the "friend" offered to be my witnes. He was transferred through all of that I was a lowly Private. By the way the "loveliest" accent I ever heard was a felow cook from Buckie, Fife. He was also a great Accordion player.
Dee Bee

Posted by: Helen Chalmers 2nd Aug 2011, 03:28am

QUOTE (Glasgow Girl @ 1st Aug 2011, 11:42pm) *
I'm a born and bred Govanite myself benny smile.gif


Posted by: Helen Chalmers 2nd Aug 2011, 03:33am

Many years ago I applied for a job as an Air Hostess by American Airlines, and was in no uncertain terms told they could not hire me because of my accent... That was in 1965... but I believe things have changed... most people like it... but I am often mistaken for Irish...

Posted by: Betty Bryant 2nd Aug 2011, 03:54am

I've lived in Australia for 38yrs and it's amazing the people who say i've got a lovely accent and love to listen to me speak,although i must say some people ask me if i'm German.
Maybe it's not the accent that is the problem sometime people just don't listen properly,i am proud of my accent and will never lose it.
i hope i've done this ok as this is the first time i've tried.

Posted by: Pat Mcgettigan 2nd Aug 2011, 05:53am

QUOTE (jimmyd @ 2nd Aug 2011, 12:36am) *
I voted yes , but wish to point out , that the only people to "have a go " in a serious manner have been English.. others may take the proverbial, in a fun way.. I have found my accent to be an asset ,here in Oz. I have worked in many areas , and apart from one factory job , all have been involved with people . Most will say the love the accent .

I agree it is the English only and I live in England now and my son is English I wiil never change my accent for no one I am proud to come from Glasgow.

Posted by: wiznayme 2nd Aug 2011, 06:05am

I voted yes only because of my radio voice, seems it is a wee bit too aggressive to some of our more sensitive cousins south of the border, fortunately not so with the ladies though.

Posted by: Dave Grieve 2nd Aug 2011, 06:11am

Went to England on business 5 or 6 years ago, and when being collected at Birmingham airport by the company I was visiting was told that they were expecting a South African, but not to worry as the Scots accent is a lot more acceptable nowadays.
I was there for 2 weeks and could pick up the ones that were anti Scots.
Never experienced that in SA.

Posted by: greta 2nd Aug 2011, 06:11am

I have to say being from Glasgow, theres nothing wrang wae a Glasgow accent. And the beauty of t is you can recognize it anywhere.

Posted by: tartanlassie 2nd Aug 2011, 06:27am

I voted yes because many years ago in a greengrocers in Manchester the very rude assistant passed me on to her colleague and in a loud voice said ... " oh its one of yours you serve her " . But I must say in 40 years of living in England I have never come across this behaviour again. biggrin.gif

Posted by: zascot 2nd Aug 2011, 06:40am

When I first came to S.A. in 71 a few people found it hard to understand me because I spoke so fast, you automatically slow down then it`s no problem. In 72 four of us were sent to Canada on business and the first night in the restuarant my SA mate joked with the waitress " If you don`t understand him(me) I`ll translate he`s from Glasgow". She said" Awright Jimmy am fae there masel maybe he kin translate fir you".He still tells the story.

Posted by: GG 2nd Aug 2011, 07:21am

Thanks for great comments and wonderful stories on the Glasgow accent!

Here's another one, from the Big Yin:


GG.

Posted by: brookbond 2nd Aug 2011, 07:26am

Is she takin ra piss?

Posted by: GG 2nd Aug 2011, 07:30am

Not withstanding Billy's humorous intervention, personally, I would have to agree with the research findings that a broad Glasgow accent (as Benny says, there is more than one Glasgow accent) sometimes does lead to prejudice and snobbery.

GG.

Posted by: drew1952 2nd Aug 2011, 07:49am

These guys only put this drivvle out to see the 'kinda reaction they get, and, as usual they've provoked comment, I live in Brum been here 40 odd years and, it cannot be helped I now talk in both 'kin accents, how do you think I get on LOL. Billy Connolly by the way talks in a scottish accent because in his own words "he has great difficulty doing any other accent"

Posted by: irrie 2nd Aug 2011, 07:58am

Morning all. When my wife Marlyn and i were in London i thought it was strange that most people understood my Glasgow accent and recognised it but they thought Marlyns Ayrshire accent was French : dry.gif Cheers

Posted by: ashfield 2nd Aug 2011, 08:38am

I guess I have two versions of speaking, one is "Glesga" and the other "Glasgow", but my accent remains the same. On one occasion during my working life, I was speaking to a teenager in my normal "Glesga". He accused me of putting it on to try and fit in with the company ohmy.gif I felt really insulted laugh.gif

On another occasion I was waiting to be served in a small bar in Jersey and overheard the conversation between the lone barman and customer. The customer asked how he coped with all the different accents he came across, the barman said it was easy as he was so used to them all now. My turn, I asked for a couple of pints of lager and the barman said............sorry??? laugh.gif

Posted by: Margaret Mary 2nd Aug 2011, 08:39am

I have never had any problems with my Glasgow Accent, most people love it!

Posted by: flashton 2nd Aug 2011, 08:46am

I have lived south of the border for more than 30 years now, so have had to modify both my accent and speed to be understood, but people still ask if I am Irish!

However, the most difficult time was when I was working in Aberdeen and used to visit an elderly lady from the countryside. Once we got past "fit like" & "nae bad" we might as well have been talking Greek- neither of us could understand a word the other said.

When I was living in Portugal and speaking Portugese people thought I was French.

That Tower of Babel sure has a lot to answer for.

Posted by: wee davy 2nd Aug 2011, 08:53am

First of all - welcome to so many new 'china's on this thread biggrin.gif I counted about 4/5.

In my 24 yr tenure as one of HM Queen Elizabeth's loyal servicemen, my accent in the early days, sometimes worked against me - as our reputations go before us, I'm afraid.

If anything, as I got older (and maybe wiser?), I found it bizzarely seemed to help me, in my day to day liasons/communications.
The less gutteral, and more smooth 'Glesga' becomes - the more seductive and fascinating it tends to makes us! LOL speaking for myself of course laugh.gif

Posted by: Melody 2nd Aug 2011, 08:57am

Aw don't get me started. See the English they want to learn to listen. mad.gif We listen intently to the many, many English accents and try to tune in order not to insult anyone. On the telephone I've often been aware of the snobbery of the English, it's almost possible to visualise the looking down of the nose at you. Anyone can put on a posh accent, it's easy. Linguistics is the skill in being able to adjust your accent in order to connect with someone. There's nothing funnier than hearing a Glaswegian putting on a posh accent. There is in reality no such thing. Telt ye ye'd get me started. laugh.gif

Posted by: bilbo.s 2nd Aug 2011, 09:17am

QUOTE (d.barber @ 2nd Aug 2011, 06:07am) *
... By the way the "loveliest" accent I ever heard was a felow cook from Buckie, Fife. He was also a great Accordion player.
Dee Bee

Buckie, Fife ? unsure.gif

Posted by: bilbo.s 2nd Aug 2011, 09:18am

I think people on here are confusing accent with dialect. huh.gif

Posted by: Negotiate Now 2nd Aug 2011, 09:33am

Not being Glaswegian I like the accent but find it difficult to understand when people speak really fast. Billy Connolly and Lorraine Kelly have come a long way and there's Lulu who changes her accent all the time from Glaswegian to American.
Irene

Posted by: norrie123 2nd Aug 2011, 09:41am

My wife and I were on a cruise, passengers were mostly American and Canadians, we had a conversation with one man and he said can we hang on till his wife arrived, they loved our accent
I have heard English accents that you could cut with a knife, we dont make a song and dance about it, we just get on with it
Funny how some Scottish programmes on TV have had subtitles placed on them, when being broadcast nationwide but we dont need sub titles for anything from England

Bye for now, norrie

Posted by: gamlenils 2nd Aug 2011, 09:42am

I lived in London for 15 years and found that in my working life clients tended to trust me more than my english colleagues.

Posted by: Hank Green 2nd Aug 2011, 09:44am

In the late 1960's, Gordon Donaldson a Broadcast Journalist with the CBC (Canada) was removed from a TV spot reporting on the Moon Launch (and eventual landing) because of complaints from listeners that it was difficult to understand his gutteral Glasgow accent. Most Glaswegians make Moon sound like MOOOON. True story! I understand that Donaldson was from Shawlands!

Posted by: tombro 2nd Aug 2011, 09:47am

I love the Glasgow accent and I wish I still had mine !

Tombro wub.gif

Posted by: Mister Glasgow 2nd Aug 2011, 10:04am

QUOTE (GG @ 1st Aug 2011, 10:44pm) *
Academic researchers from King's College London (KCL) have concluded that the Glasgow accent is one of the stupidest sounding accents in the UK. The researchers say that they have identified an "untainted snobbery" where owners of a Glaswegian accent are wrongly judged to be less capable because of their accents. ...

Have a wee look at some of the videos on 'misterglasgow' and 'glasgowtelevision' on you tube.

Posted by: bilbo.s 2nd Aug 2011, 10:05am

I must have a very strange accent. On meeting me, some new acquaintances know immediately that I am Glaswegian, while others do not have a clue and do not believe me when I enlighten them.

Posted by: jake keith 2nd Aug 2011, 10:49am

I was called a foreign B a few times when they heard me speaking and yet my accent is not at all strong. Yet the inbred idiots that called me this had such an idiotic accent it made others laugh when they heard them calling me a foreigner. I am proud to be from Glasgow Scotland and I have as I ssaid not a strong accent, but you can tell I am Scottish. I actually get a lot of compliments too from many people as they said I speak with clarity and excellent pronunciation of the words without any need to repeat myself in a conversation with all the people I meet and that includes my recent trips to the USA and also Thailand and the Philippines. I will say one thing though, I have met a lot of real ENGLISH people that need to repeat their sentences to whoever they are talking with and I did eventually translate on their behalf. Jake.

Posted by: Mister Glasgow 2nd Aug 2011, 10:49am


This young lady from Salt Lake City likes our accent .........

Posted by: Heather 2nd Aug 2011, 10:52am

I was born and bred in Glasgow and lived here all my days but I'm another one who when abroad have been asked if I'm Irish. rolleyes.gif

My sister works in the Tax Office in New Jersey and one day a man came in about his tax and and after two of her colleagues had tried to help him my sister had to step in as her colleagues could not understand a word the man was saying. It turned out he was from the Gorbals and although he had lived in America for over forty years his accent was as broad glaswegian as the day he left Scotland.

My sister's colleagues said they were surprised she knew a foreign language and asked what Country the man came from, " from Glasgow the same place as me " she told them and had a good laugh at the expression on their face as they could understand her no bother but did not have a clue the man was also Scottish.


Posted by: Glasgow Girl 2nd Aug 2011, 11:20am

Great story Heather! laugh.gif

Posted by: Dave Grieve 2nd Aug 2011, 11:24am

The problem with the Glesga accent is that it doesn't travel well.
When living in Glasgow it not a problem understanding each other, but as soon as we leave we find that words like Peeta instead of Peter and Breid instead of Bread just dont work, this is probably why people that retain their Glesga accent are prejudiced against outside the city.
When i first left to work in England and started meeting people from Newcastle, Liverpool and the like I thought I was talking to Martians, but the thing is even though they have hard to understand accents they are English living in England and are acceptable.
The minute they realise you are Scots and even worse from Glasgow you are treated as if you are some kind of moron.
I have found the majority of people that look down on a Glesga/Scots accent live in England while the only people I have met here in SA with anything bad to say about my accent are also English but at least they pretend to be joking about it.

Posted by: bilbo.s 2nd Aug 2011, 11:27am

A Spanish friend was visiting Glasgow many years ago and was going up in the lift of a big department store, in the days when they had lift operators. It stopped at a floor and the operator announced the departments, much to the consternation and puzzlement of an English lady. My Spanish friend translated into English for her, and was asked if he was from Glasgow. "Naw," he replied, " am Spanish."

Posted by: bilbo.s 2nd Aug 2011, 11:40am

QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 2nd Aug 2011, 12:04pm) *
I think people on here are confusing accent with dialect. huh.gif


Not to mention poor diction and slovenly speech which can occur anywhere to add to the stranger´s confusion.

Posted by: *Jim McGee* 2nd Aug 2011, 12:10pm

I hate what's left of my Glasgow accent, I wish that my parents had sent me to elocution. I now live in England and can't take any of the Scottish Parliamentarians seriously. They may be educated but they don't sound like it!

Posted by: JAGZ1876 2nd Aug 2011, 12:15pm

As a Glasgow taxi driver for many years, i have learned that if i spoke a bit more slowly whilst retaining my Glasgow accent, i can be understood by people from around the world. Yet when i visit my inlaws in England i am constantly being asked to repeat myself. I can only assume that this is a default position for them, they just can't help themselves. The only time i am not asked to repeat myself (regardless of which part of England i am in) is when i ask, Would you like a drink ? Funny that rolleyes.gif

Posted by: LizzieLou 2nd Aug 2011, 12:25pm

Hi Everyone, I've live in Portsmouth Hampshire for over 35 years and never had any problems with my "GLASGOW" accent. In fact people love it! I've held several jobs in admin and customer oriented environments and have been told by the experts that a "Scottish Accent" is the most calming tone around. PROUD TO BE SCOTTISH AND OF MY WONDERFUL ACCENT!

Love you x
Lizzie Lou

Posted by: Virginia rebe; 2nd Aug 2011, 12:27pm

My Wife is a glaswegian, and everywhere we go in the USA or our travels abroad, people dearly love that Scottish accent.

And anyway, who the hell cares what some idiot at a college says,
probably has a PHD, Piled High and Deep (bull hockey that is).

Yanks and toffs, two peas in a pod!

"You know you Scots can rise now and be a Nation Again"

Jerry
Virginia Rebel

Posted by: zascot 2nd Aug 2011, 12:56pm

QUOTE (JAGZ1876 @ 2nd Aug 2011, 02:01pm) *
As a Glasgow taxi driver for many years, i have learned that if i spoke a bit more slowly whilst retaining my Glasgow accent, i can be understood by people from around the world. Yet when i visit my inlaws in England i am constantly being asked to repeat myself. The only time i am not asked to repeat myself (regardless of which part of England i am in) is when i ask, Would you like a drink ? Funny that rolleyes.gif

What else would you expect, they`re English. tongue.gif

Posted by: Jim Crawford 2nd Aug 2011, 01:51pm

I was born in Glasgow and now presently living in Canada for the past 40 years and still have my Glasgow accent which I refuse to lose. I have owned my own retail business for going on 35 years and the only comments I have heard from people and customers are "I LOVE YOUR ACCENT". Never has it stood in my way or held me back. But then again when you look what country these idiotic oppinions are comming from it certainly isn't that surprising, is it?. Envy and Jealousy take many forms.

Posted by: DaveEE 2nd Aug 2011, 02:05pm

I've been in a few scraps because of my accent but the surprising thing is it has been in or around the Elgin and Nairn areas where they dont like the lowlanders and call us wegians so who cares what the Londoners think when people from our own country dont like how we sound! GETITRIGHTROONTHEM i say!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: rumcdonald 2nd Aug 2011, 02:31pm

QUOTE (benny @ 1st Aug 2011, 06:32pm) *
The problem is that there's nae such thing as "a Glasgow accent", really. There are Glasgow accents, rangin all the way frae panloaf Kelvinside tae gutter Govan, wi numerous shades in between. (Sorry, Govanites, nae offence intended. Jist a bitta alliteration. biggrin.gif )

Some Glesga accents approximate merr tae Standard English than others, so it's quite possible that some are greater objects of prejudice than others.

I agree with Benny that there are many ranges of Glasgow accent. However, some of the real "broad" stuff puts even me off. I'm from Govanhill, and like Govan, there are many many shades of accents. I have never met anyone in Canada who didn't like my Glasgow accent..in fact they love it.

Posted by: mlconnelly 2nd Aug 2011, 02:36pm

I agree DaveEE, our own countryman can be just as bad when it comes to the Glaswegian accent. When I first started to research my family tree many years agos (before everything could be done online), I went through to Edinburgh's Register House, where, as soon as he heard my accent, the security guard thought it would be clever to make fun of my accent which kinda spoiled my day but being a lady I decided his stupid jibes were not worth answering. I have been back through more recently and things have change very much for the better and I now enjoy going through to do my reseach and also to do it in a very beautiful building.
While working in a call centre, doing directory enquiries for the UK, I have been asked if I came from everywhere from Ireland to Pakistan. Being called names is par for the course in called centres, but constantly having to explain to (usually English) people that I am not and never have been stupid and that calling me a Scottish b*****d is a racist comment and that they could be subject to prosecution does become extremely wearing after a while. Mary

Posted by: Scot Rose 2nd Aug 2011, 03:42pm

I was raised in Glasgow and came to Canada at 19. My accent is still very strong although I am told when I go home I sound like a Canadian, yet here everyone detects my Glasgow background and tell me they love the accent, very rarely do I have someone tell me they cannot understand me but I know my accent does sound more authoratative than some wee meek mild mannored Canadian.

When I was first in Canada I was asked to tone it down a little as my accent was thick and my speach fast. I slowed down a little but never gave up my accent for a phony one thank you very much! I have been a successful business woman here for 25 years now. So if people are having a problem with your accent, succeed beyond their wildest imagination, they'll soon want to talk to you all the time, accent anaw!

As for the trash talkers of Glasgow, Everywhere has them. They embarrass me too.

When people do not finish their words or "put it on" stronger than it needs to be with the F's & C's thrown in for bad measure.

"You tell on yourself by the way you talk, the way you slouch and the way you walk". If you want to embarrass yourself, you can, go ahead but don't emply to the rest of the world that you represent a fair cross section of Galswegians!

We all had a great education in Glasgow, use it, don't be a numpty!

Posted by: McScotty 2nd Aug 2011, 04:18pm

I work overseas a lot (Africa, US, Europe) and people do find our accent in general, a real issue - I think it can sound "aggressive" at times (depending on who is talking), we can talk very fasta nd don't always enunciate as well as we should (due to our speech patterns) Ithink that we also use words that are very "Scottish" (aye, whit, och etc) in situations when talking to people that ar enot Scottish and expect them to understand whcih other nationalities tend not to do. Then again the Scottish accent (ok maybe not the Glasgow one) is regularly in the top 5 favourites list in worldwide polls. As noted previously there is no actual Glasgow accent there are several Glasgow accents, if your talking about "wee Jimmy" ranting on with his " c u , c me" type of talk then yep it is a ridiculous accent - but in general I think its ok an that wee man ok!?

Posted by: d.c. 2nd Aug 2011, 04:28pm

There were complaints in the Scottish media last week, after CNN News used subtitles when a Glasgwegian MP was speaking at Westminster, but didn't use subtitles when English MPs were speaking. I was actually watching the MP on BBC News at the time and was wishing that they had used subtitles as I couldn't understand what he was saying - and I am Glaswegian - so what chance does the rest of the country (or the world) have ?

What I do find embarrassing is when I am sitting on a bus and can understand Poles or other nationalities speaking in perfect and easy to understand English, but I don't know a word some of the young locals are saying, other than the odd expletive.

I have heard it said that "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak". Never was that more true than on a number 62 bus in Glasgow.

Posted by: nippynell 2nd Aug 2011, 04:54pm

What a joke...I suppose the "cockney" "geordie"..to name but a few speak excellent english...LOL

Posted by: Heather 2nd Aug 2011, 07:58pm

Scot Rose, I also hate bad language.
It's bad enough from adults, but when it's from teenagers and I hear them at the f'ing and c..t words it makes my blood curl. I don't think the realise how bad they sound. mad.gif

Posted by: Grampar 2nd Aug 2011, 08:15pm

I am happy for those people who have never had a negative attitude towards their Glasgow accent but I mainly deal with people in England on the 'phone and I find occasionally I get a very negative response. The latest was last week when frustrated at trying to get a simple answer to an enquiry I eventually had to hang up on an apparently young man who was so arrogant in his attitude that he obviously thought that I was of an "inferior race". It was so obvious that it was my accent he objected to by the nature of his replies. Needless to say my telephone conversation left the problem unresolved and I had to resort to an email and wait 24 hours for a reply that I could have had almost immediately by 'phone. I admit that these cases are rare but they, unfortunately, do occur. Stangely enough I also speak to people in Belfast a lot and never have any problems with the Irish. Addressing a conference of people from all over the U.K. many years ago I received one or two comments " off stage" so to say. These were constructive criticisms not so much about my accent but at my speaking to rapidly, as we Glaswegians tend to do, and I went on for another twenty five years addressing annual and special conferences at my ease. In a lighter vein my youngest "English" granddaughter thinks all Glasgow speak is "gibberish". This despite the fact that her father still has a distinctive Glasgow/Scottish accent. huh.gif

Posted by: *Blackie* 2nd Aug 2011, 08:26pm

I was once told by an English Man [ from Norwich ] that his HIDDEN FEAR was to be stuck in a lift with either a Geordie, a Scouser or a Glaswegian. My reply to him was, I am Not really concerned about the Geordie or the Scouser, But what is your Problem with Glaswegians and his reply was :- YOU ALL TALK OUT THE SIDE OF YOUR MOUTHS and YOU ALL SPIT. mad.gif dry.gif

Posted by: margie 2nd Aug 2011, 08:29pm

Well folks i,v read all your posts on this subject and all I can add is --- yi know when yiv met a true glaswegian cause the,ve got a brilliant sense o humour. Being wan masell I niver tire o hearin masell talkin. cheers Margie. rolleyes.gif

Posted by: Heather 2nd Aug 2011, 08:44pm

laugh.gif Margie you certainly made me laugh with the above comments and I understood every word. But then i'm Glaswegian.. laugh.gif

Posted by: angel 2nd Aug 2011, 09:05pm

Scot Rose, I also hate bad language.
It's bad enough from adults, but when it's from teenagers and I hear them at the f'ing and c..t words it makes my blood curl. I don't think the realise how bad they sound.
......................................

Hi Heather , the teenagers in all probability pick it up from their
own Parent's and carry on with this foul language into adulthood ,
but personally I think it's caused by the lack of vocabulary,
it's so much easier to use a cuss word than the proper word .

About the Glasgow accent , I have listened to my own voice
which I don't like and coupled with the accent just drove me crazy
and no matter how hard I tried I could not change my accent , so I
took the time to improve my diction over the years , I still have my scottish accent here in Canada but in Scotland it is considered Canadian
and it certainy does not sound like some wee , meek , mild mannered Canadian , in general they have a pretty nice accent . and they are also no that wee .

Posted by: glasgow lass 2nd Aug 2011, 09:27pm

Gaun yersel margie. laugh.gif

Posted by: Heather 2nd Aug 2011, 09:40pm

I remember on Holiday in Malta one time and I bought an ornament in a shop and was waiting for the assistant to wrap it when another salesman asked me if I was being served and I said," the assistant is wrapping up a wee ornament for me ". He laughed and asked if I was Scottish and I told him "yes ". He said " I always know the Scots with the use of the word wee ". laugh.gif

Posted by: angel 2nd Aug 2011, 09:43pm


but in Scotland it is considered Canadian
and it certainy does not sound like some wee , meek , mild mannered Canadian , in general they have a pretty nice accent . and they are also no that wee .

In response to post #65 .







Posted by: TeeHeeHee 2nd Aug 2011, 09:54pm

The area where I live - on the furthermost SW corner of Germany - has (for me) the most difficult to understand dialect of all the German states and localities. It's called allemanisch, which; technically, can be translated as for all men.
This might have been so about 1000 years ago but today when anyone from this state; politicians and high rankers included, is being interviewed on national television, sub-titles are invariably used.
This is really nothing to get heat up about. When I talk to locals they have no difficulty understanding my German; Glasgow dialect included, but when they make a reply then I genuinely need an interpreter ... and I've been here nearly 24 years or more. There are people here with whom I'm befriended; including Mary's insurance agent, who really find it difficult to speak the German equivalent of our proper English ... and they're all educated people.
When two or more of them get started in the local dialect I just talk to the cats.
Our neighbouring Swiss speak Swiss German (Schweitzerdeutsch; known locally -and phonetically- as Sweetzadooch) and although it took me a while I do understand them better than the allemannen because they do speak a tad slower.
I can understand the use of sub-titles on TV though.
Imagine being a farmer who lived in a Norfolk (UK) village and were listening on television to a Scottish MP with a Glasgow dialect who was making an important point which had to do with; for example, an agricultural policy which might effect your livelyhood.
Wouldn't you be be thankful for sub-titles? rolleyes.gif
I don't think the sub-titles should be taken so to heart. wink.gif

Posted by: jakka13 2nd Aug 2011, 11:35pm

I wasn't long in Canada and had started work .There was a Scottish woman I worked with who had a very posh affected accent .She told me one day that if I wanted to suceed in Canada I would have to lose my dreadful accent .My reply to her was that I liked my accent and until I found one I liked better I'd keep the one I had .I've now been here over forty years and I've done just fine .Even with my Glasgow accent. wink.gif

Posted by: *Jean* 3rd Aug 2011, 12:29am

I have lived in Canada for over 40 years and people still say to me I have a lovely accent and I was Glasgow born and bred

Posted by: hagstrom dannyocu 3rd Aug 2011, 12:44am

living in Holland now for 27 years when i first arrived realised most dutch people understand English very well but textbook English the Glasgow accent not a hope in hell one guy thought i was scandanavian so it was learn to speak proper English or Dutch so i learned Dutch of course

Posted by: angel 3rd Aug 2011, 01:46am

When two or more of them get started in the local dialect I just talk to the cats.

You know Tomi, it's the same here..... when two or more Glaswegians get together , I have heard Canadians say that they do not understand a word being said , and we are supposed to be speaking the same language, as they . not German !

Posted by: Melody 3rd Aug 2011, 08:19am

As long as we know what we're saying. laugh.gif

Posted by: DaveEE 3rd Aug 2011, 08:32am

QUOTE (mlconnelly @ 2nd Aug 2011, 03:22pm) *
I agree DaveEE, our own countryman can be just as bad when it comes to the Glaswegian accent. When I first started to research my family tree many years agos (before everything could be done online), I went through to Edinburgh's Register House, where, as soon as he heard my accent, the security guard thought it would be clever to make fun of my accent which kinda spoiled my day but being a lady I decided his stupid jibes were not worth answering. I have been back through more recently and things have change very much for the better and I now enjoy going through to do my reseach and also to do it in a very beautiful building.
While working in a call centre, doing directory enquiries for the UK, I have been asked if I came from everywhere from Ireland to Pakistan. Being called names is par for the course in called centres, but constantly having to explain to (usually English) people that I am not and never have been stupid and that calling me a Scottish b*****d is a racist comment and that they could be subject to prosecution does become extremely wearing after a while. Mary

Hi Mary ive had the same reception in the same building when i was trying to find my real name im sure you can work out why,then i discovered i was born in Edinburgh with an English father and an Irish mother and have a Glasgow accent! Sometimes the world is a crazy place and sometimes the craziest thing of all are the people who cling to it!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Rabbie 3rd Aug 2011, 10:12am

Och, what a load of auld cobblers.

I see the highly eminent wastrels at the world renowned KLC "Academics’ Research Dept" have greatly exceeded their normal annual production of organic fertilizer, tripe and mince.

Who or what actually funds these discouraging and completely negative "research" projects?

I am sure the pennies could be better spent on real genuine scientific / medical research. What a waste of finances on a shower of cerebrally challenged Weegiephobes.
No doubt these wannabe tefal hieded buffoons think Scotland is part of the US of A and Glasgow is in Alaska and the Lord Provost is Michael Palin, perhaps these factors could account for their confusion with their perceived “accent” issue .

The only people I have had slight issues with my white sandstone articulation were seriously crocked French or Moroccan naval ratings who suffered from severe hearing and speech impediments. Add to this a sparse smattering of pretentions snotty middle classed english knobs & knobettes who truly have no clue of their true vocation in life. You know the type, all gob and no substance and even their english counterparts shun them.

Go bile yer hieds!

wink.gif


Posted by: Lennox 3rd Aug 2011, 11:29am

I've never had a negative response to my Glaswegian accent. Most people love to hear it and its usually a ice breaker .. whoever did the test is probably just jealous that they don’t have one They should spend all that time and money on a research that they can do something about mad.gif

Posted by: droschke7 3rd Aug 2011, 12:03pm

I've noticed a common theme here, as with others I often get asked if my accent is Irish or what part of Ireland I'm from. I'm from Alderman Road (knightswood), but spent many years all over the world firstly when my father was in the RAF then when I joined the RAF myself and then I lived and worked as a civi in Germany for 21 Years. I Now live in Whiteinch, but even when speaking German the Germans keep on asking me to speak slower as I speak too fast. I must admit that due to my years of travel my accent does tend to change to be similar to that of the particular person I'm talking too at any one time, but I do still hate it when people ask me what part of Ireland I'm from.

Posted by: bilbo.s 3rd Aug 2011, 12:43pm

I was once asked by a Belfast acquaintance what part of Ulster I was from. As you say, Droschke, I often tend to mimic the accent of the person I am talking too. I often worry that this might cause offence, but it is not done deliberately or maliciously - only to help understanding. I do it with foreigners but draw the line at copying the English. rolleyes.gif

Posted by: rumcdonald 3rd Aug 2011, 02:43pm

QUOTE (Mister Glasgow @ 2nd Aug 2011, 05:50am) *
Have a wee look at some of the videos on 'misterglasgow' and 'glasgowtelevision' on you tube.

I live in Canada now, and we often crowd round my computer just to see Mr Glasgow and the folks he knows. I love Mr Glasgow!!!!

Posted by: gardenqueen 3rd Aug 2011, 04:56pm

I am not sure that the Glasgow accent sounds stupid but what annoys me is how thickly it can be laid on when some people are away from home. People I have known for years begin to speak in a very slovenly way using slang and a strong Glasgow accent. Where does that come from? It is as though they want to "impress" people by how rough they can sound. I am not kidding, I have noticed this with my relatives and friends who had the same upbringing as myself and who hold down very good jobs, all of a sudden wanting to sound as awful as possible.

We were pretty poor when we were being brought up in Glasgow but mum, and other relatives, always ensured that we spoke properly and now I often cringe when I hear this "I'm Glaswegian and proud of it, I won't make any effort to be understood, take me or leave me" sort of attitude.

I know I have been away from home for 40 years but I do go back regularly and have noticed this trend in the past ten or so years when people come to stay in England with me.


Posted by: rumcdonald 3rd Aug 2011, 05:24pm

QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 2nd Aug 2011, 05:04am) *
I think people on here are confusing accent with dialect. huh.gif

You are absolutely right.

Posted by: rumcdonald 3rd Aug 2011, 05:40pm

QUOTE (Mister Glasgow @ 2nd Aug 2011, 06:35am) *
This young lady from Salt Lake City likes our accent .........

I enjoyed this, but my favourite has to be the endearing Emily. Loved the one in her home...all that pink..and the knick-knacks on her wall. I can't find that video now.
I live in Canada now, but go home to Glasgow often and visit the Barras. I'm wondering how Emily is.

Posted by: Guest 3rd Aug 2011, 06:05pm

It has being my experience in life, it is not only what you say its how you say it. Born and raised in Glasgow and traveled the world with no one complaining about how I speak or what I say ! Its nice to be nice no matter where you are from or how you speak. When in Rome be a Roman. It has got me a long way smile.gif .

Posted by: wellfield 5th Aug 2011, 03:27am

Bottom line is, when you travel you can speak with a Glasgow accent (the way your Mother told you to speak) but not a Glesga' accent......I notice more and more on American T.V. they use 'sub-titles' a lot on English and Scottish accents

Posted by: tamhickey 5th Aug 2011, 04:56am

I worked in the public sector for many years and went to telephone techniques courses. This of course didn't disguise my being Scottish, but professionally, Glaswegianisms were oot the windae
I see that Bimingham came second in this nonsensical research. I may be biased, but a Bimingham lass asked me out just because of my accent!
My wife is from the south of England and has been in Glasgow for over 10 years. She has no problem understanding the accent, and loves the place. When we started to see one another, I would go down to visit and everyone in her village loved my accent. Maybe it's due to those telephone courses, but my accent is toned down compared to how it may have sounded. I do know that it all comes back, with speed on a night out lol

Posted by: andyguinness 5th Aug 2011, 01:33pm

Very much so, when drink is involved, we tend to sound offensive and threating, due to the way we curtail our words and punctuate them.

Posted by: kenb 6th Aug 2011, 07:24am

QUOTE
Academic researchers from King's College London (KCL) have concluded that the Glasgow accent is one of the stupidest sounding accents in the UK. The researchers say that they have identified an "untainted snobbery" where owners of a Glaswegian accent are wrongly judged to be less capable because of their accents. ...

GG. Sounds to me some boffins sound stupid after the vote.

Posted by: lord anthony 6th Aug 2011, 01:47pm

I find it curious that no reference is made to the Glasgow glottal stop, one of its defining qualities..... and it is UGLY.

I'd bet plenty that weegies who live away or who have to deal regularly with other english-speaking cultures find they have to SLOW DOWN, and quickly abandon the GS simply to be understood.

And I've found weegies in Canada who carry it forward in reverse-snobbery mode, those who have no inclination to clue in and who prefer hanging with their own tribe at all costs.
And who follow Rangers/Celtic with undiminished venom.

Observations from thirty-five years here in SW Ontario.

Posted by: Glasgow Girl 6th Aug 2011, 02:43pm

QUOTE (lord anthony @ 6th Aug 2011, 02:33pm) *
I find it curious that no reference is made to the Glasgow glottal stop, one of its defining qualities..... and it is UGLY.

I'd bet plenty that weegies who live away or who have to deal regularly with other english-speaking cultures find they have to SLOW DOWN, and quickly abandon the GS simply to be understood.

And I've found weegies in Canada who carry it forward in reverse-snobbery mode, those who have no inclination to clue in and who prefer hanging with their own tribe at all costs.
And who follow Rangers/Celtic with undiminished venom.

Observations from thirty-five years here in SW Ontario.




Rather snobbish observations, if you don't mind me glotting stopping. wink.gif

Posted by: beth 6th Aug 2011, 02:56pm

thank you Glasgow Girl I was thinking along those lines but could not find the words. yes, I hang out with my "Tribe" on many occasions, my "Tribe" being that of the world. I work and socialise with South Africans, in fact, our best friends are South Africans, but I LOVE everything Scottish and never miss an opportunity to BE Scottish. I am a Weegie and talk like a Weegie and am proud to be a Weegie, and before you say anything else lord anthony. I was a financial migrant, we could not afford to buy a home of our own at that time and came here "for a couple of years". but, life happened and here we are 40 years later, still proud Weegies and wondering how life would have turned out if we had stayed in Glasgow. the reverse of those who 40 years later are wondering how life would have been if they had left Glasgow

Posted by: angel 6th Aug 2011, 05:20pm


I find it curious that no reference is made to the Glasgow glottal stop, one of its defining qualities..... and it is UGLY.

well lord Anthony , I had never heard of the glottal stop until now
so I decided to check it out and it appears that it is used in all languages.
and dialect's.
I was not however able to find a video using a glasgow accent , but I think this will explain to those of us who have been suffering from this
horrible affliction " according to your worthy self " huh.gif mad.gif

and who knows , you just might learn something .


http://youtu.be/RmS0zjuYkzs








Posted by: Elma 6th Aug 2011, 05:54pm

In school we were told that the use of the glottal stop was a lazy way of speaking as was found in the use of the Glasgow dialect. Having been brought up in Dumfriesshire and only moving to Glasgow when I was 10 I never spoke in Glaswegian and find it very difficult to read some of the posts on GG written in vernacular. As was suggested by another poster I just skip over them.

I have many friends both in the Vancouver area and now here in Kimberley, mostly Canadian but some are English and also some Scots. When I was thinking about this none of the Scots are from Glasgow. We, my huband and I and our three children have been in Canada now for 40+ years, we came as my husband used to say as political migrants, we left Scotland to get away from the policies of Harold Wilson and his Labour government. We sold our house in Giffnock and arrived here with most of our furniture ready to give Canada five years to see if we settled down, we did smile.gif and became Canadian citizens five years after we landed.

Posted by: bilbo.s 6th Aug 2011, 06:09pm

Allo John- gaw-a new mau-a ? laugh.gif

Allo Jock- gaw-a new moh-urr ?

Posted by: angel 6th Aug 2011, 06:19pm




Bill , hope you did'nt spend a lot of money biggrin.gif

Posted by: bilbo.s 6th Aug 2011, 06:35pm

ye mean a law-ah money ? biggrin.gif

Posted by: angel 6th Aug 2011, 08:09pm

QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 6th Aug 2011, 06:21pm) *
ye mean a law-ah money ? biggrin.gif


Eggzaklay..... tongue.gif

Posted by: benny 6th Aug 2011, 08:34pm

QUOTE (lord anthony @ 6th Aug 2011, 03:33pm) *
I find it curious that no reference is made to the Glasgow glottal stop, one of its defining qualities..... and it is UGLY.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, or in this case the ear. The glottal stop is an integral part of such languages as Arabic, Hebrew, and even some varieties of Chinese, so it isn't only an aberration confined to Glaswegians or Cockneys.

Posted by: Beatrice McArthur 7th Aug 2011, 01:32am

I am, and will always be, a Glaswegian, residing in America since 1961.

My Glasgow accent has been a great assett in cultivating friends and upward job mobility. I have lived in many US states and worked in the government health field. After I speak with patients and staff I feel them relax and become more open with me. In stores and other public places people will approach me and ask me where I am from and add they love my accent. At professional and political meetings other attendees ask me about Glasgow and tell of their good experiences when they were there on vacation.

I still have a strong Glasgow accent due in part to my frequent visits home and telephone calls to family. I have several friends here from Glasgow and we often meet together for a good old dance and sing along. My last trip to Glasgow was several months ago and I was appaled at the many pot holes throughout the city that had not yet been repaired from my last visit but that's politics not the Glasgow accent. I thank God that I am a Glasweigian with the accent to prove it.

One man's garbage is another man's treasure.

Posted by: bilbo.s 7th Aug 2011, 07:10am

The points were made in the Youtube link. There is a legitimate use of the glottal stop but the abuse by Cockneys and Glaswegians is purely slovenly speech. This laziness has increased over the years and "ned-speak" is practically unintelligible to most people, as very few consonants are in evidence.

Posted by: Glasgow Girl 7th Aug 2011, 09:19am

QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 7th Aug 2011, 07:56am) *
The points were made in the Youtube link. There is a legitimate use of the glottal stop but the abuse by Cockneys and Glaswegians is purely slovenly speech. This laziness has increased over the years and ned-speak is practically unintelligible to most people, as very few consonants are in evidence.

Doesn't seem to matter to Jay Z....Millionaire rapper.....from Brooklyn, New York.

Posted by: bilbo.s 7th Aug 2011, 10:02am

Oh well, let´s all talk gibberish and become millionaires. Easy peasy ! tongue.gif

Posted by: benny 7th Aug 2011, 10:15am

QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 7th Aug 2011, 08:56am) *
The points were made in the Youtube link. There is a legitimate use of the glottal stop but the abuse by Cockneys and Glaswegians is purely slovenly speech. This laziness has increased over the years and "ned-speak" is practically unintelligible to most people, as very few consonants are in evidence.


Aye, there's a legitimate use of the glottal stop - whatever use people decide to put it tae.
Aw the outraged purists' condemnation o it isnae gonnae make wan bitta difference.
Personally, ah don't see how the glottal stop is anymerr ugly or slovenly than the "Lawr" and "Indiar" beloved of English newsreaders.

Posted by: Glasgow Girl 7th Aug 2011, 10:26am

I'm longing or Lord Antiny to come back. I wonder sometimes at these'new posters' who post such out your face things for reaction.........if I didn't know better and all that.........

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 7th Aug 2011, 10:28am

QUOTE (bilbo.s @ 7th Aug 2011, 07:56am) *
... "ned-speak" is practically unintelligible to most people ...

laugh.gif Bill, you're not this Caped Crusader by any chance are you? laugh.gif

Gramma Man tongue.gif strikes again.



Posted by: bilbo.s 7th Aug 2011, 10:31am

"Personally, ah don't see how the glottal stop is anymerr ugly or slovenly than the "Lawr" and "Indiar" beloved of English newsreaders. " quoth Benny.


Absolutely agree. Personally, I deplore all those faults - equally slovenly and ugly.

One is no worse than the other , but no better either.

Posted by: bilbo.s 7th Aug 2011, 10:34am

QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 7th Aug 2011, 01:14pm) *
laugh.gif Bill, you're not this Caped Crusader by any chance are you?

Gramma Man tongue.gif strikes again.





Too hot for all that gear here, Tomi. Shorts and t-shirts until November. tongue.gif

Posted by: Chrissie 8th Aug 2011, 12:08am

Benny, I love that you make the distinction between Glasgow talk and Glesga. biggrin.gif

Thank goodness for Angel. I never heard of glottal stop either. Well maybe I did and just don't remember. I think I finally got it after Bilbo's car sale effort.

I'm happy the Glesga hasn't gone. Last August when I was in Glasgow most folks I met now spoke their ma's proper or "polite" english but their accents were just fine. Few had a mammy and none had a maw. Methinks the language has evolved liked most things. Ah well. rolleyes.gif

Posted by: angel 8th Aug 2011, 12:38am


Thank goodness for Angel. I never heard of glottal stop either. Well maybe I did and just don't remember. I think I finally got it after Bilbo's car sale effort.

you Know Chrissie , I was thinking the same thing , it's this aging business
it's no good smile.gif now I have to go ,,I have a call on skype


Posted by: lord anthony 8th Aug 2011, 01:46am

I found it hilarious that some commenters labelled me as a snob. I’m a snob’s worst nightmare, but if my passion for proper use of the English language makes me a snob to some, I’ll run with it.
Language in general is fascinating, English in particular. I paid attention in school as to where the apostrophe and comma are legal, I know a dangling participle when I see one, and mixed metaphors an endless source of amusement.
Other school-subjects were a disaster, but that’s for another blog. Maybe a therapist-ic one.

This forum, great. A reflection of the Glasgow I was sad to leave, like another commenter for economic reasons, leaving my city where spirited debates in pubs widened my appreciation of the rapidly-changing world.
Yes, a pint or two loosened our tongues. And the regulars on Byres Road came and went, occasionally celebs from BBC who were available for a chat, particularly if you were with someone who could provide an introduction.
Billy Connolly won’t remember me now, but he followed me into a pub to ask where I got thae troosers, those godawful deck-chair canvas-stripes which came and went quickly with the sixties and a good thing too.

I love the identification here of ned-speak. Straight from Clockwork Orange. Glasgow’s version of Ebonics.

An old org. labour pal of mine, a veteran of a million meetings, quoted: I don’t go fishing every day but when I do I usually catch something.
I hooked a couple of ad hominem/namecalling insulters with my thoughts on the Weegie glottal stop, but that’s ok.

Anyway, a weegie who tells me he/she lays on the GS and other bad language habits undiminished when attending job interviews and parent-teacher meetings is being disingenuous.
Or as we say, “at it”.*

* For the GS-afflicted,…… “a? i? “


Posted by: angel 8th Aug 2011, 04:35am



* For the GS-afflicted,…… “a? i? “


Well Lord Anthony , the afflicted cannot stop you from posting ,
so just please yourself .

Posted by: tamhickey 8th Aug 2011, 04:57am

Next year, Ken Loach will release his new film "The Angel's Share" which takes place in Glasgow and in the north of Scotland. Two friends of mine were cast from both areas which surely shows the faith that the director places in his actors and their accents. He's made several films here now, and not only him, many have been made and are in the process of being made right now in our vibrant city.
If we were so unintelligable and sounded so stupid, do you really think this would be happening?
Our city is full of talented people and I personally have a film which myself and my wife produced which has been selected for Cinefringe in Edinburgh in the next couple of weeks.
Could it be that some people actually LIKE our accent and talents?
I do like Lord Anthony though, he's gallus and a damned fine fisherman!

Posted by: weebren3 8th Aug 2011, 06:38am

This is the most stupid post I have ever read, English you cant understand half of there dialect,you have the cockney,liverpool,and other areas. You are A Morron,maybe you should learn not to send idiotic statements like that. I am A proud Scots and no dont like post or people like you.That is A form of discrimanation. So be carefull what you say,or go back to school learm english.

Posted by: bilbo.s 8th Aug 2011, 07:22am

??? unsure.gif

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 8th Aug 2011, 07:35am

QUOTE (lord anthony @ 8th Aug 2011, 02:32am) *
I found it hilarious that some commenters labelled me as a snob ...

How's Mrs McPhee keepin' these days? tongue.gif

Posted by: bilbo.s 8th Aug 2011, 08:36am

QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 8th Aug 2011, 10:21am) *
How's Mrs McPhee keepin' these days? tongue.gif


No another auld flame ? unsure.gif

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 8th Aug 2011, 12:25pm

I thought Lord Anthony might just be our old friend Alex McPhee in disguise. wink.gif tongue.gif

Posted by: angel 8th Aug 2011, 12:39pm

Mega City Key Holder

Posts: 9,569
Joined: 25th Jan 2009
From: German/French/Swiss border town on the River Rhein
Member No.: 6,448
I thought Lord Anthony might just be our old friend Alex McPhee in disguise.

Tomi ,I think you may be showing signs of paranoia biggrin.gif

Posted by: Rabbie 8th Aug 2011, 02:50pm

Looks like they are oot tae get ye Tomi...

ph34r.gif

Aye, did Alex no have a brother called Shuggie who a chef on some unmentionable soap opera where the whole set shoogled every time somewan closed a door?

Posted by: ashfield 8th Aug 2011, 05:46pm

Aye Rabbie, we could be at the crossroads wi' this thread right enough dry.gif

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 9th Aug 2011, 10:52am

QUOTE (angel @ 8th Aug 2011, 01:25pm) *
QUOTE
I thought Lord Anthony might just be our old friend Alex McPhee in disguise.


Tomi ,I think you may be showing signs of paranoia biggrin.gif

Naw Angel, Mr McPhee was always good for a laugh.
I miss guys like him on the GG boards. What happens - do they just get bored and leave? rolleyes.gif

Posted by: Mister Glasgow 9th Aug 2011, 11:05am

Dear BBC .....PLEASE STOP HIGHLIGHTING /REFERRING TO THE DISORDER IN ENGLAND AS THE 'UK RIOTS ' .....THERE ARE NO REPORTS OF DISORDER IN SCOTLAND ........ ITS AN ENGLISH PROBLEM .....SO PLEASE DO NOT DRAG OUR COUNTRY INTO THE TROUBLE .

I notice that members of the Scottish police forces are stating that they are ready to send down to ENGLAND as many of there officers with stupid Glaswegian accents as they can muster ....

Posted by: Glasgow Girl 9th Aug 2011, 11:14am

It's not but a few weeks or so that another survey or something similar proclaimed Glasgow to be the most dangerous city in the UK....Oh really???

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 9th Aug 2011, 11:52am

QUOTE (Mister Glasgow @ 9th Aug 2011, 11:51am) *
Dear BBC .....PLEASE STOP HIGHLIGHTING /REFERRING TO THE DISORDER IN ENGLAND AS THE 'UK RIOTS ' .....THERE ARE NO REPORTS OF DISORDER IN SCOTLAND ........ ITS AN ENGLISH PROBLEM .....SO PLEASE DO NOT DRAG OUR COUNTRY INTO THE TROUBLE .

I notice that members of the Scottish police forces are stating that they are ready to send down to ENGLAND as many of there officers with stupid Glaswegian accents as they can muster ....

Can you speak up a bit ... my batteries are low. rolleyes.gif
QUOTE
THERE ARE NO REPORTS OF DISORDER IN SCOTLAND

Is that because we have a better class of anarchist in Scotland ... or are they just a bit slow in gettin' organised?

Posted by: wellfield 15th Aug 2011, 04:04am

QUOTE (klingon @ 1st Aug 2011, 06:13pm) *
I got the flipside of my Glasgow accent when I was fired from a bar job in Canada as they reckoned my Glasgow accent was to aggressive and scared the punters!-

Right You!!...wut ur ye' huvin!!...lol

Posted by: scossie 15th Aug 2011, 04:18am

Ach whits awe the fuss aboot......When the wife and i drove intae Sydney OZ from Adelaide..I said to ma Govan wifie ..Hang oan and i'll phone a real estate fur house rental..And when in the phone box dialled a number...Next thing i knew this lady was saying..My...What a gorgous accent you have....Ten minutes later the wife banged on the door and asked whats happening...
The rest is history.....Be yirselfs and nobody else.....Awelavwa the noo...ps..When in Rome go Roamin...Cheers Scossie................ biggrin.gif

Posted by: Barry 1st Sep 2011, 06:12pm

I hate hearing the glaswegian accent on tv...it sounds soo deprived. Id rather much meet a nice polite english speaking lady with the attractive english accent, than a "burd". ha rolleyes.gif

Posted by: benny 1st Sep 2011, 11:40pm

Whit "nice" English accent wid that be? Brummie, Geordie, Scouse, or the yokel yodelllers of Zoider country? Mebbe the melllifluous tones of true Cockney, or is it the insipid drawl of Oxbridge?

By the way, bein polite has nothin tae dae wi yer accent. Ye can be rude in BBC English an polite in a Glesga accent.

Posted by: tamhickey 2nd Sep 2011, 05:04am

I think Barry's extracting the urine here lol.

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 2nd Sep 2011, 11:55am

QUOTE (Barry @ 1st Sep 2011, 06:58pm) *
... than a "burd". ha rolleyes.gif

Watch it pal ... A'm sharin' a nest wi' a big burd ... an' two cats tae. laugh.gif tongue.gif

Posted by: Doug1 20th May 2012, 05:43pm

I dont think there is a Glasgow accent per se. It depends on what part of the city you come from. If you come from the posh areas like Bearsden or Giffnock its unlikely you will call your head your "Heid" or your kids your "weans." I was born and raised in Govan and even there the accents were all different in fact I went to the same school at the same time as Sir Alex Ferguson but I dont sound anything like him

Although I'm now retired I work in a hotel bar in Inverness and meet a lot of English folk and many times I've been told I obviously sound Scottish but very rarely has anyone ever said I sound Glaswegian. Awe well Och Aye the Noo.

Posted by: wellfield 21st May 2012, 10:12pm

On my travels,if they don't understand you,you're from Glasgow...lol

Posted by: wee mags 21st May 2012, 11:40pm

evryone thinks Iam Irish

Posted by: Isobel 22nd May 2012, 01:58am

Me to Mags.
biggrin.gif

Posted by: droschke7 22nd May 2012, 09:19am

QUOTE (wee mags @ 22nd May 2012, 12:38am) *
evryone thinks Iam Irish


I have the same problem and I've never even been there nor do I have any form of relatives from there.

Posted by: Elma 23rd May 2012, 12:49am

I'm mostly asked, "Do I detect a Scottish accent?' but once I was accused of being Welsh!! tongue.gif rolleyes.gif

Posted by: Doug1 23rd May 2012, 05:34pm

QUOTE (Barry @ 1st Sep 2011, 06:10pm) *
I hate hearing the glaswegian accent on tv...it sounds soo deprived. Id rather much meet a nice polite english speaking lady with the attractive english accent, than a "burd". ha rolleyes.gif

Ouch Barry.....RP (received pronunciation) is very kind to the ears and pleasant to listen to and I would fully endorse that view but believe me there are many polite speakers in Glasgow. As I have said already in this forum there are many different accents in Glasgow and some of them are rather extreme but I have also met many very clear and concise speakers.

Ahm aff noo to see if ma burd has made me dinner lol

Posted by: Doug1 15th Jun 2012, 03:57pm

Ah blame Jeremy Kyle for giving our glasgow / scottish accents such a bad name. Every time i've seen scottish guests on his show he gets them all wound up and they start ranting and raving like a bunch of loonies and I (as a govanite) cant dam well make out a word they say shock3.gif

Posted by: GG 15th Oct 2015, 11:55pm

Oh well, a wee bit of a turnaround today... from stupidiest to sexiest.

QUOTE
Glasgow has the sexiest accent in Britain

People from Glasgow have the sexiest accent in Britain, apparently, while those hailing from Newcastle sound the most intelligent.

That's the verdict from a British Airways survey conducted earlier this month, which quizzed 1,000 Americans and 1,000 Brits on their knowledge of and opinions on regional accents from the opposite country.

A quarter of the Americans questioned decided that Glaswegians, such as James McAvoy and Kelly Macdonald, sound the sexiest in the country, with the east London-based Cockney accent coming in second, taking 16% of the votes.

The Geordie dialect from Newcastle, meanwhile, was deemed most intelligent by 36% of Americans. The Essex accent was seen as least intelligent - only 7% gave it a nod.

GG.

Posted by: kiltie2 16th Oct 2015, 11:23am

You couldn't make this one up! on a holiday to America and to also meet up with friends who had moved there, on one of our many nights out I was asked where in the Bronx I lived!!!?? when I managed to stop laughing and wipe the tears from my eyes and tell this woman, I'm from the west coast of Scotland, she said, and I quote" gee, your English is real good! where did you learn it?" I said I thought it would probably have been my mother as she would have been the first person to speak to me:) The other American friends who were with us were MORTIFIED:)

Posted by: Heather 16th Oct 2015, 05:58pm

laugh.gif laugh.gif Ah Kiltie, I could not help laughing at that silly woman.

I have been in America often, and I just came back from there a few weeks ago.

I have never had any problem with people asking me silly question's.

My sister has been there since 1963 so her friends know I am Scottish and they all seem to like the Scottish accent.

Posted by: kiltie2 16th Oct 2015, 06:48pm

Och Heather, I should have explained, my pal who has been there for years, and I are both Burns Country, folk, so definitely not posh Jocks:) my pal after being there quite a number of years was asked once "Are you aware you have an accent" all of this honestly has us howling:) I decided we should try to adopt a Sean Connery accent, so had a wee practice, we were useless at saying SHO!:)

Posted by: carmella 17th Oct 2015, 09:32am

In certain parts of the States, like Heather, I have never had a problem, but you have to also remember that Americans depending on where they live, are very parochial, and don't know what happens in the next town, let alone the world at large.

I went to live and work in Dallas, Texas when I was much younger, I stayed there with my Aunt and Uncle - she from Ayr[left in 1953 with my uncle] and he a Texan. Great times I recall in my life then, but it utterly amazed me, not only in and around Dallas, but other parts of the States, where people thought I must have learned to speak English, and some of the stupidist questions I was ever asked, was in the States.

I've never had the problem when I visited my other aunt and uncle, who lived for 40 years in Bostoin, and also those in the New York area.

It show a great lack of education, or even if they were taught about other countries, a great lack of appreciation or interest.

In th eastern parts of the States there are more Scots and Irish, so I woouldn't have expected to have a problem there - not so in the other parts.

I recall at the time, feeling quite embarrassed for them (not for me).

Posted by: Betsy2009 17th Oct 2015, 10:04am

Oh, I don't know. I think it's quite sweet. After all, we were taught English at school so we did sort of learn to speak it.
English people - speak English.
Welsh people - speak Welsh
Scottish people - speak Gaelic???
Makes sense to me.

It's much worse when people ask you if you're English. Aaaargh!!!

Posted by: Shuggie McGafferty 17th Oct 2015, 11:09am

AcumfaeGuvin annadonn huve anacsent that yese wid notice ataw' n' that.
As fur yon socauld Glesga accent if youse is no fraeGuvin a dinna see whit aw the fuss is aboot cause maist o' yean out sideaGuvin is aw lerned tae talk
Inglish. Or iss ma granny wid cry it the BURL.

Posted by: GG 14th Nov 2015, 04:19pm

QUOTE
Cristiano Ronaldo: I don't understand Sir Alex's Glasgow accent

Cristiano Ronaldo admits he still cannot understand what Sir Alex Ferguson is saying.

The Real Madrid forward describes Ferguson as a "father" figure who was vital in shaping his career during six years at Manchester United, but confessed to ITV chat show host Jonathan Ross that he still finds the Glaswegian's accent impenetrable.

"I still don't understand him. In the beginning, I had a translator, a Brazilian man, of course, basically only for him," Ronaldo said.

GG.

Posted by: kiltie2 15th Nov 2015, 09:47am

Och GG you know whit's rang! there isnae an app fur that! quick! somebody invent wan, we're supposed tae be, or yist tae be! gid it that:) an mind tae include a humour button that explains sarcasm. smile.gif

Posted by: Shuggie Hey 17th Nov 2015, 09:38am

QUOTE (GG @ 14th Nov 2015, 04:27pm) *
GG.

Acanny undirston him neether. As he disnea cumfaeguvin (ur dis he?) he wid no be subject tae the genuwine Burl as talked by the the tru affikionadoes of the Langue de Glesga. As spoked in the Baillie A Ghovan accent. So ther Jimm.

Posted by: kiltie2 17th Nov 2015, 11:36am

Behave yerel' Shuggie! smile.gif how come yer no unerstaunin a upmerket Govin accent!? smile.gif

Posted by: carmella 19th Nov 2015, 03:50pm

It doesn't surprise me in the least that Ronaldo has trouble with the Alex speal, I have trouble myself, but with others too.

What irks me more than anything, is that it seems all of the newsreaders, from BBC to SKY can pronounce correctly, so many difficult names, destinations etc, yet they canny properly pronounce some, indeed most of the Scottish names and places, without putting their feet in their mouths - just bugs the life out of me.

There are a few English accents that I have difficulty with, when they speak fast, so there.


Posted by: kiltie2 19th Nov 2015, 04:32pm

Gon yersel' Carmella, Longing for the day when something happens in Auchinshuggle:) and it makes national news, or maybe Lock! Ness, that's like chalk across a blackboard! and I've tried shouting at the telly, it's Loch!!! doesn't work:( another thing I was picked up for in America, is apparently! we don't pronounce our T's? I'm positive I didn't say Scoland? or did I? but then, I'm totally, and absolutely positive none of my young relatives ever Majored in Cheer leading at Uni:) this was a young girls answer when I asked her what her main subject was at University, she was kind enough to inform me it's called Majoring, well, daft me, I should have known:)!

Posted by: angel 19th Nov 2015, 06:14pm

Well Kiltie , this topic has come up several times on this board and no matter , when it comes to the Glaswegian accent it is in fact quite difficult for peoples from other countries to understand and for those who see no further than Scotland , but are fortunate to do a little travelling , maybe you should tone down you accent somewhat ,
after all .
You ,me and others are guest's in those foreign countries and should if nothing else , show good manners and consideration No matter whether they speak Double Dutch or North American English ..

Posted by: tottie ann 19th Nov 2015, 09:42pm

I recently was in a department store and the woman standing next to me spoke to me as she was Scottish I said oh you have an accent like mine to which she replied yours is a lot stronger than mine you must be from up north somewhere I said to her I am very proud of my accent and having lived here in NZ for fifty years have no intention of losing it to which she replied that she had lived here fifty one years and seemed so proud that she had lost some of it SILLY MOO

Posted by: kiltie2 20th Nov 2015, 08:10am

You've taken my comments totally out of context Angel, this was not a slight at people from other countries, i just hadn't noticed I was missing out the T! the rest is called humour, more a laugh at ourselves than others. sigh:(


Posted by: kiltie2 20th Nov 2015, 08:13am

You did well tottie ann not to fall about laughing, oh! you've only been here 50 years, well I've been here 51! you won't be in any hurry to run into her again smile.gif

Posted by: Melody 20th Nov 2015, 09:17am

I wonder how people abroad manage to understand the English Cockney accent when the Cockney will say things like:

I fink I'll frow out fat fick fing as it only cost firty free pence from the frift shop.

Translation: I think I'll throw out that thick thing as it only cost thirty three pence from the thrift shop.

The reason I am able to understand and translate this accent is...........I listen and can understand many differing accents in England and Scotland, even American and Canadian accents. laugh.gif Listening is the thing or fing. laugh.gif

The rain in Spain stays mainly on the plain. laugh.gif

Posted by: bilbo.s 20th Nov 2015, 09:23am

Quite so, Melody. Apart from your last sentence, which is nonsense! tongue.gif

Posted by: Melody 20th Nov 2015, 09:43am

laugh.gif laugh.gif Och ah knew ye'd be on to me there bilbo.s.

Posted by: Betsy2009 20th Nov 2015, 10:10am

Ignore him, Melody. He only lives there. If Professor Higgins says it's true then it must be. wink.gif

Posted by: Melody 20th Nov 2015, 10:17am

laugh.gif Och he's an auld pal Betsy. No Professor Higgins, bilbo.s. laugh.gif

Posted by: bilbo.s 20th Nov 2015, 10:21am

The rain in Spain goes mainly doon the drain, but at times they cannae cope.

Posted by: carmella 20th Nov 2015, 02:46pm

I have a friend and ex-colleague who lives in Benamargosa, the streets were recently flooded very badly, but did eventually go doon the drain I think,

Posted by: Scots Kiwi Lass 21st Nov 2015, 06:50am

On arrival in Christchurch, NZ, in 1963, I had a few problems being understood. I was employed in the Labour Department and as I had to spend some time on the telephone switchboard, I had to learn very quickly to speak slower due to a few difficult calls! I recall one day I met two girls I knew slightly and after chatting for a couple of minutes one said to the other "what did she say?". Now that really riled me.

Many years later, working at Lincoln University as a Director's Secretary, I was favourably compared to another secretary, who funnily enough came from Edinburgh and prided herself on having been a teacher in elocution!

Occasionally I have been a bit naughty if someone comments that I've never lost my accent - I reply that I haven't found a better one yet.


Posted by: Betsy2009 21st Nov 2015, 08:04am

Nice response, SKL.
thumbup.gif

Posted by: Melody 21st Nov 2015, 09:34am

QUOTE (Scots Kiwi Lass @ 21st Nov 2015, 06:58am) *
On arrival in Christchurch, NZ, in 1963, I had a few problems being understood. I was employed in the Labour Department and as I had to spend some time on the telephone switchboard, I had to learn very quickly to speak slower due to a few difficult calls! I recall one day I met two girls I knew slightly and after chatting for a couple of minutes one said to the other "what did she say?". Now that really riled me.

Many years later, working at Lincoln University as a Director's Secretary, I was favourably compared to another secretary, who funnily enough came from Edinburgh and prided herself on having been a teacher in elocution!

Occasionally I have been a bit naughty if someone comments that I've never lost my accent - I reply that I haven't found a better one yet.


Brilliant post SKL there is no better accent. smile.gif

Posted by: Melody 23rd Nov 2015, 09:53am

Me to Mr Melody: How many are there in that packet?

Mr Melody to me: There are two mini.

Me to Mr Melody: No that doesn't look like too many to me.

Sad but true.
blush.gif laugh.gif


Posted by: Shuggie Hey 25th Nov 2015, 08:05pm

QUOTE (kiltie2 @ 17th Nov 2015, 11:44am) *
Behave yerel' Shuggie! smile.gif how come yer no unerstaunin a upmerket Govin accent!? smile.gif

Us yins came frae the unsofistikated part a' Guvin an' wisnae lernt tae talk right till a wis 13. An that wis only because a' hud an superior education at a well kent school bein' clivirer than the maist a yon yins whit still couldny Parliama Glesga.

Posted by: brian432 25th Nov 2015, 08:48pm

One thing that rally annoyed me was a movie set in Glasgow and there were subtitles. Can't remember what the movie was called.

Posted by: ashfield 26th Nov 2015, 08:02am

QUOTE (brian432 @ 25th Nov 2015, 08:56pm) *
One thing that rally annoyed me was a movie set in Glasgow and there were subtitles. Can't remember what the movie was called.


Kelvinside the Movie unsure.gif laugh.gif

Posted by: Scots Kiwi Lass 26th Nov 2015, 10:33am

QUOTE (brian432 @ 25th Nov 2015, 08:56pm) *
One thing that rally annoyed me was a movie set in Glasgow and there were subtitles. Can't remember what the movie was called.

I remember seeing a film called "Sweet Sixteen" around 10 years ago that had sub-titles. I was suitably huffy about it but the worst of it was I was too busy reading the sub-titles I couldn't keep track of the movie.

The amount of times the "F" word was used was unbelievable but the movie was quite educational and I think was successful. I think it was set in Greenock but could be wrong.

Posted by: *Shuggie* 2nd Dec 2015, 09:46am

QUOTE (brian432 @ 25th Nov 2015, 08:56pm) *
One thing that rally annoyed me was a movie set in Glasgow and there were subtitles. Can't remember what the movie was called.

ARRIVIDECI GUVIN!!!

Posted by: Betsy2009 2nd Dec 2015, 11:51am

Can any of you say 'seven' the English way?
Try not to say 'sivn' and see how silly you sound.

Posted by: ktv 2nd Dec 2015, 12:18pm

"Carl" always got me.

my english mate Carl constantly tells me im calling him "Carol"

but sorry mate im no going to swallow my tongue trying to say your name right haha