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> The Glasgow Effect, Glaswegians dying younger
Noel
post 24th Mar 2010, 03:28pm
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As a former Police Officer of some 35 years, I think I can confirm the abuse of alcohol and drugs as a major contributor to the breakdown of family and social life in the city. I am not teetotal-I enjoy a glass of wine with my dinner in the evening-but I have never drunk whisky. I tell my friends from other countries that we Scots are quite clever. We make whisky and sell it to others and that helps us to become wealthy. I did not drink alcohol until I was in my forties, not an easy task as a member of Glasgow's finest, but I tend to ignore criticism and tend to stick to my own beliefs. Glaswegians are generally good at that. If you have teenage children who are drinking, ignore the daft laws that others have made and give them a clip on the ear. They might even thank you for it when they grow up.
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Gallusbisom
post 24th Mar 2010, 03:40pm
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I have read and considered the options before voting and I am not sure that they are not "missing" something. I left Glasgow in '57 and at that time it was still a busy and vibrant city, at least as far as employment went. Then things seemed to crash (perhaps it was in the works and I was just too young to know--quit snickering you lot) Things changed in the world at large and Glasgow was no longer a pivotal port, the world shifted. Glasgow tried to adapt by tearing down old neighborhoods and replacing them with "flyovers" etc. etc. etc. BUT what did we offer the youth of the city as far as job options went and so on? Not much I suspect. Now, Glasgow has a history of gangs and religious preduicde justified?--- probably (the history seems irrifutable not that that excuses anything ). That may come from her very interesting and varigated past. My question is----What was done to replace all the jobs/employment that resulted? What were the governing body of Glasgow, at that time doing to create jobs for the upcoming (and by now it is the grandchildren of that era) to"Make Glasgow Flourish"? What did the kids get taught? Were they encouraged to try computers skills, etc. I do not know, nor should I make a judgement being away so long. It would seem to me that finding some opportunities for our young folk might make a big difference.

GB
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*Guest*
post 24th Mar 2010, 08:18pm
Post #18






I would agree with these comments. I've lived in places all over the world, and I think Glasgow is the worst place I've lived so far. Glasgow is filthy, polluted, and decaying. It seems to be populated by drunken, uneducated, stab-happy neds who will think nothing of seriously harming another person simply because they have a different football strip on. There is no pride in Glasgow, as people here throw garbage everywhere they please, as there clearly is no consequence for such actions. The police force here are not equipped to deal with the level of human misery and violence that plagues this city. The levels of hygiene and health in this city are beyond miserable. The Scottish government and city council seem to do nothing to help change the dismal way of life in Glasgow.
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glasgoweffect
post 24th Mar 2010, 09:53pm
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Hmmm - can't see I agree with "guest", but obviously Glasgow has something going wrong.

According to the research, the "Glasgow Effect" applies to rich as well as poor Glaswegians, and it only seems to have appeared recently. Maybe it was always there but masked by other factors?

In any case, after a flurry of coverage yesterday in the Herald and on the Scottish TV news, it appears to have vanished from the headlines already.
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j.irvine bell
post 24th Mar 2010, 10:29pm
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So whats new? Death will come to all and knowing that we are statistically likely to die younger than other "comparable" cities in the U.K. will not change that. By the way what other city is COMPARABLE with the Dear Green Place?
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Isobel
post 25th Mar 2010, 01:31am
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I can only make a guess at what the problem may be. I have been away from Glasgow for more than 37 years. Each time I have been home I have had a great time. Wonderful shopping very friendly people, I don’t think will ever change. However I was really disappointed to see how dirty and untidy the place looked, Perhaps living there you don’t notice it quite the same. People throw their garbage anywhere, in other parts of the world people are trained from a very early age to pick the garbage up. This cant be healthy.
The drinking blew me away I have never seen so many drunks in one place in my life. Sad to say all ages. The amount that people consume in one night out is unbelievable also the numbers of people smoking yes even the young who are being educated about the dangers of smoking. Perhaps their needs to be more programs at the school level on healthy living, nutritious foods and the dangers if you don’t look after your body. Take them on field trips to the morgue show then organs of people who have not looked after their bodies. Think of the money this would save the system in the long run.
As far as I am aware you still have very good health care available to all. People used to envy the education system in Scotland.
The seniors are very well taken care off.
So it all sounds good so why is it not working? Perhaps people need to show more interest and get more involved in their own communities. Have some pride in the area they live in and start by cleaning up your own little area and who knows it may spread into other areas one can only hope.

Who is at fault? I don’t know? But something needs to be done, the people of Glasgow deserve better than this.


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**Catherine**
post 25th Mar 2010, 04:05am
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I left Glasgow at the age of 16, for Canada.

My memories of alcohol usage in Glasgow were already imbeded in my mind. Watching men,(only men then) staggering out of Pubs at closing time just seemed to me to be part of life. I never gave it much thought. It was exciting to watch, at my young age,to see the arrival of the "black Maria" not sure of this title, arrive and throw those involved in fist fights into the big Van.

In the year 1974, I took my husband,and four kids to visit their Grandparents in Glasgow .. They, my kids, aged between 5 to 9 years,had a ball teaching kids they made friends with how to play baseball. The novelty of going to the local shops for this and that fascinated them. Dykes in the backcourt were well used. I, their Mum, wanted them to experience places she had visited during the summer in her younger years... Seaside resorts were visited, etc., So since your Summer evenings are long, my kids played with their new found friends till about Pub closing time.

Please, take this, in the context I wish to place it.. Upon our return to Canada,and taking into consideration the age of my children,,,,, when an adult asked them if they enjoyed Scotland????? To my dismay, all they talked about was, and I quote...."well there were fights, and the Police with a Van picked them up" end of quote.

My point of posting the above is obvious..... I was born in Glasgow in the year 1937 Have returned many times and love my home Town and it's people... but I ask........... Why are we still blaming the politicians for Glasgow's problems????..... Upbringing begins at HOME.
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TeeHeeHee
post 25th Mar 2010, 08:09am
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QUOTE (Isobel @ 25th Mar 2010, 02:48am) *
.... really disappointed to see how dirty and untidy the place looked ... in other parts of the world people are trained from a very early age to pick the garbage up ... people need to show more interest and get more involved in their own communities. Have some pride in the area they live in

With the influx of east Europeans to this once well cared for area you can see the rapid change in the staus quo. Daily having to clear away rubbish from around the house and removing bottles or cartons from the hedges. Older people frightened of schoolkids outside their homes.
This is something entirely new to me here and I've been around Europe a good bit too.


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"Destiny is a good thing to accept when it's going your way. When it isn't, don't call it destiny; call it injustice, treachery, or simple bad luck.”
― Joseph Heller, God Knows
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Isobel
post 25th Mar 2010, 03:14pm
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Fortunately my children were not out in the evenings when we visited my parents in Glasgow, so they only have good and happy family memories. However my youngest daughter and her husband toured Europe in 2007. As I have lots of cousins still in Glasgow, so this was their base, my family would not have it any other way. To my surprise Glasgow was the favourite spot. They loved the city had a great time with their many cousins. However the one comment was the amount of liquor that the young folks consume. Now my Kathryn is a really fun person and likes a good party but she could not keep up. In the pubs she said they were constantly at your table asking if you wanted another round. You felt that if you did not have another you would have to move out. Now why can’t a group of friends go out have a couple of drinks and relax for the evening. Also the amount of people of all ages walking the streets smoking.So as far as people not living as long in Glasgow it all comes down to health education in my opinion, and yes Catherine I do agree with your statement it all starts in the home. Don’t leave everything to others.

I also take your comment Tee Hee Hee about all the different cultures, but there is no other city more diverse than Toronto and we have a very clean city. I would say cleanliness is the first step to a healthy life style.


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Tommy Kennedy
post 25th Mar 2010, 05:13pm
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Why are we still blaming the politicians for Glasgow's problems????..... Upbringing begins at HOME.

The State does have a responsibilty for social ills - 'Sink estates' - Education - liqour laws. It's all our cities that have Glasgow's problems.
The question to be asked is: 'Why does U.K & U.S. have the most problems of binge drinking/drug abuse than any other Western country?
Answer: Because the Establisment has no will to tackle the problems. There is big money in booze!
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Neil-9%Growth
post 26th Mar 2010, 03:43pm
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My guess would be a particular combination of genetics & weather. Vitamin D is caused by exposure to sunlight & is increasingly seen as being of major importance to general health, not just preventing rickets & MS. The evolutionn of white skin seems to be a relatively recent evolutionary adaption to it (a mere 50,000 yrs) so the effct is significant. Scotland being one of the most notherly heavily ingabited parts of the world gets less sunlight & the west coasr of Scotland, being next to the Gulf Stream has a high cloud incidence.

I have suggested to both politicians & all the major newspapers that one useful thing the Scots Parliament could do is legislate the provision of extra Vitamin D in milk, bread, salt etc. Obviously this is more constructive but not as politically correct as banning things so they weren't interested.

See http://a-place-to-stand.blogspot.com/search?q=vitamin+D
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Isobel
post 28th Mar 2010, 07:51pm
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Wow Neil that was a very interesting read.Who knows perhaps it would help in the health area,certainly would not do any harm.


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wellfield
post 28th Mar 2010, 09:16pm
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I've got plenty sun here in California!...and bags 'o Vitamin D...But am' still dyin' fer' a Fish Supper!!!!!!!...my Cholesterol count is only 146 after my younger years of Fish and Chips..Sweeties..Biscuits..Smokin'...Drinkin'...and I still go to the Gym.
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wellfield
post 28th Mar 2010, 09:18pm
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QUOTE (Gallusbisom @ 24th Mar 2010, 08:57am) *
I have read and considered the options before voting and I am not sure that they are not "missing" something. I left Glasgow in '57 and at that time it was still a busy and vibrant city, at least as far as employment went. Then things seemed to crash (perhaps it was in the works and I was just too young to know--quit snickering you lot) Things changed in the world at large and Glasgow was no longer a pivotal port, the world shifted. Glasgow tried to adapt by tearing down old neighborhoods and replacing them with "flyovers" etc. etc. etc. BUT what did we offer the youth of the city as far as job options went and so on? Not much I suspect. Now, Glasgow has a history of gangs and religious preduicde justified?--- probably (the history seems irrifutable not that that excuses anything ). That may come from her very interesting and varigated past. My question is----What was done to replace all the jobs/employment that resulted? What were the governing body of Glasgow, at that time doing to create jobs for the upcoming (and by now it is the grandchildren of that era) to"Make Glasgow Flourish"? What did the kids get taught? Were they encouraged to try computers skills, etc. I do not know, nor should I make a judgement being away so long. It would seem to me that finding some opportunities for our young folk might make a big difference.
GB

Good article...I agree!
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*Harry Greeenwood*
post 29th Mar 2010, 09:36pm
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Like some before me I passed on the voting and maybe, just maybe, had there been a category for "all of the above" I would consider placing my mark.

I left Glasgow for Canada after WWII when it was a dark, drab city in the throes of post-war let down and despite experiencing the joy of exit, a part of me, the heart part, refused to leave and subsequently I have been a regular returning visitor. On these visits I watched both the progress and the regress in the infra-structure and development, or lack of it, but in fairness it was all in line with most cities in the UK where the culture of industry predominates.

I once loved the drumbeat to which the Glaswegian marched with vitality and pride but more and more, on my visits, I detect the muffling on the skins and a range of darkness under which the people live.

My optimism encourages me to believe that this is a temporary state and the spirit of the people will rise to embrace then emulate the vitality that was expressed in the year of flowers and during the designated description of Cultural Centre of Europe but it is wearing thin and I now tend to lean to pragmatism and it is here that I record the depression of the city.

Glasgow may claim to be a beautiful green but in reality it is a filthy unkempt place housing drunkeness, bigotry, racism, poverty and violence, all of which is no doubt fired with the fuel of unemployment, squalid housing and poor education.

My God, what has taken over the place that my heart refuses to leave? When will people realize that they are betraying the efforts of Gallagher, Maxton and McLean et al who raised the city to a world class example of progress and when will honour the Veterans who fought for a way of life intended to leave no one behind.

Glasgow will not flourish by spouting platitudes, it will not flourish until its people fertilize its core with political activity and stop listening to politicians and start to address them.
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