Glasgow Guide Home

Whats On Glasgow Guide
  Glasgow What's On


    Glasgow Reviews


    Glasgow Gallery


      Glasgow Links
Discuss | Guestbook | Postcard | News | Weather | Feedback | Search | About | What's New
Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )                >> View Today's Topics <<

7 Pages V  « < 3 4 5 6 7 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Rationing.
DannyH
post 18th Dec 2013, 10:38pm
Post #61

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,899
Joined: 13th Apr 2010
Member No.: 8,412
Hello All

On the subject of rationing during World War II, I would like to give you a little insight into what it was like for the shopkeepers. It was no picnic, I can assure you!

There is mention in at least one previous post that the person had to be in the queue early outside the shop.

My mother was the manageress of a grocery shop in Maryhill Road, just across the road from East Park Home. She would be in the shop long before the customers started queueing. Every customer had to be registered with her shop, to be able to buy rationed food, otherwise they had to be turned away.

The Ministry of Food was very strict. Every ounce of rationed food sold had to be backed up by the grocer producing a ration coupon for that ounce of food. So not only had she to balance the financial books for the annual audit, she had to balance the books for the Ministry of Food inspectors. To do this she would bring home all the ration coupons collected each day and count them, and log the statistics into a book. This was done of course after she had cooked our dinner. Also keep in mind that this was the days before automated checkouts. She and her staff added up the cost of the customers groceries on a piece of paper using a pencil which they kept behind their ear. The so called uneducated Glasgow customers were quick to tell them if they were a penny out!

In addition to this, there was also the Environmental Officers to contend with. The Grocers were responsible for keeping the pavement outside their shops, spotlessly clean.

It was war-time so if there was even a chink of light appearing from the shop, an ARP warden would soon appear. When she closed the shop in winter months it would be completey black outside. She then had to carry the days taking in a bag by tram to the bank her boss dealt with, and deposited it in the night safe. Then she walked home in the blackout.

I have mentioned this before in another topic, but it is worth mentioning again. My mother had a half day off work on a Tuesday. She spent this at the 'steamie' doing the family wash. She had to iron this of course. That was done on her only full day off, Sunday. When I hear some people say that modern living is more stressfull than it was for previous generations, I just wish my mother was still alive. I am sure she would say, "Tell me about it"!

Thanks Rab for giving me the opportunity to tell my wee story.

Regards to All

Danny Harris
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dave Grieve
post 19th Dec 2013, 05:40am
Post #62


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,700
Joined: 22nd Sep 2010
From: Umhlanga Rocks South Africa
Member No.: 9,005
Interesting tale Danny and a lesson for the modern generation who cant live without their fixed working hours, computer, calculator and smart phone.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Betsy2009
post 19th Dec 2013, 09:06am
Post #63

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,292
Joined: 21st Jun 2013
Member No.: 25,701
I enjoyed Danny's story too.

Thank goodness for calculators and washing machines - but we're still stuck with the blasted ironing.

I'm not sure about the fixed working hours though. I know it wasn't unusual for me to do 12 hour days to keep up with the workload and both my son and daughter in law have the same problem. Don't forget that UK workers work some of the longest hours in Europe. Not all of them, of course! Bosses seem to be able to ask anything of staff as everyone is worried that they'll loose their jobs if they don't do extra and it's not easy to get a new job. Whatever happened to 'overtime' payments?

My little step-mum, like Danny's mum, could add up the cost of her messages before the girl on the till told her the total and could tell her if she'd made a mistake without looking at the receipt. Old Scottish education?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
angel
post 19th Dec 2013, 11:13am
Post #64


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 14,449
Joined: 27th Mar 2007
Member No.: 4,675
I recall my mother saying to me that she was very glad that she had raised her family during the 40s and early 50s , life seemed less complicated then than now " she was referring to the late 70s " I wonder what she would think of these present times , and now I am very glad that I raised my children in the 60s and 70s.

I also think that , these times are more stressful for families than it has ever been no matter the generation and todays technology is for today's lifestyle. I also think that most people can now accomplish a lot more in their daily life than did past generations.

This is only my opinion based on experience and observation.


--------------------
donate to your local food bank .
Pat.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*Guvin Jimm*
post 26th Dec 2013, 02:13am
Post #65






As an aside to rationing, keep in mind that all during the war and the years followin when Britain was completly bankrupt, at no time did the citizens of Britain suffer from hunger or starvation. This was due to the heroism of the Merchant Navy and its' R.N. and R.C.N. escorts. The rationing was a way of maintaining this welcome state of affairs for a country long at war. Although there were claims the "Toffs" could always double dip and there were black marketeers abounding, the British people as a whole were much better of than most others during this period.
All through the war basic medical, food and infrastructure were maintained. After the war with rationing still inforce, the government worked wonders bringing in the National Health scheme which with free orange juice as well as free infant formula, school milk and the "Green Lady" ensured a fair go for the baby boomers of 46 and into the late 50s. QUITE AN EFFORT AND ONE THAT WILL BE SADLY FORGOTTEN.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
boots
post 16th Mar 2014, 06:41am
Post #66


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,189
Joined: 26th Oct 2004
From: Winnipeg, MB. Canada
Member No.: 1,524
Guvin Jimm, thank you for remembering the men of the Merchant Navies and the ships that were their escorts. We owe them our lasting gratitude for without them we would have starved. On the whole, we ate pretty well in spite of rations. It is my understanding that our generation was more robust and taller than the generation before. Galbraiths gave me my first job. I started on my 14th birthday as a cashier sitting in a little cubby hole at the back of the store. when I would much rather have been out front where the action was. Two senior clerks looked after the first queue, they checked registration, stamped books cut coupons and wrote down how many books of rations the customer was entitled to receive, the customer then moved to the other side of the store where she waited her turn to be served. In those days butter, margarine and lard were cut by the clerk from blocks, sugar and other dry goods were scooped from sacks or other bulk containers and everything was weighed or measured by hand. Our store manager was Jimmy Stewart, an excellent man for the position he held. Danny, your mother no doubt shared many of the same attributes, managing the store included hiring, training and keeping staff and that called for a totally different set of skills than those needed for managing goods and money but these people could do it all. You can be really proud of your Mom. thumbup.gif

This is really a long time ago but strangely enough I can still recite one week's rolleyes.gif "rations for one."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mairead
post 4th Nov 2014, 01:03pm
Post #67


Super Resident
****
Posts: 215
Joined: 16th Sep 2014
From: Argyll
Member No.: 26,634
Food for thought.
Close to remembrance day and I am again thinking of my uncle who was shot down in the 2nd world war. He was with the Royal Canadian Air Force and while searching for some details of him I found that 17,530 men of the RCAF had died fighting for us. I never realised just how many commonwealth troops died with our our own and that was just the Canadian Air Force.


--------------------
The bluebell of Scotland is hanging her head
The Lion, once Rampant, in lying like dead
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*Billy Boil*
post 21st Nov 2014, 10:41am
Post #68






QUOTE (DannyH @ 18th Dec 2013, 10:55pm) *
Hello All

On the subject of rationing during World War II, I would like to give you a little insight into what it was like for the shopkeepers. It was no picnic, I can assure you!

There is mention in at least one previous post that the person had to be in the queue early outside the shop.

My mother was the manageress of a grocery shop in Maryhill Road, just across the road from East Park Home. She would be in the shop long before the customers started queueing. Every customer had to be registered with her shop, to be able to buy rationed food, otherwise they had to be turned away.

The Ministry of Food was very strict. Every ounce of rationed food sold had to be backed up by the grocer producing a ration coupon for that ounce of food. So not only had she to balance the financial books for the annual audit, she had to balance the books for the Ministry of Food inspectors. To do this she would bring home all the ration coupons collected each day and count them, and log the statistics into a book. This was done of course after she had cooked our dinner. Also keep in mind that this was the days before automated checkouts. She and her staff added up the cost of the customers groceries on a piece of paper using a pencil which they kept behind their ear. The so called uneducated Glasgow customers were quick to tell them if they were a penny out!

In addition to this, there was also the Environmental Officers to contend with. The Grocers were responsible for keeping the pavement outside their shops, spotlessly clean.

It was war-time so if there was even a chink of light appearing from the shop, an ARP warden would soon appear. When she closed the shop in winter months it would be completey black outside. She then had to carry the days taking in a bag by tram to the bank her boss dealt with, and deposited it in the night safe. Then she walked home in the blackout.

I have mentioned this before in another topic, but it is worth mentioning again. My mother had a half day off work on a Tuesday. She spent this at the 'steamie' doing the family wash. She had to iron this of course. That was done on her only full day off, Sunday. When I hear some people say that modern living is more stressfull than it was for previous generations, I just wish my mother was still alive. I am sure she would say, "Tell me about it"!

Thanks Rab for giving me the opportunity to tell my wee story.

Regards to All

Danny Harris

I am inclined that the stress of modern living is more related to "multitasking" than to actual working hours.

My mother also worked 48 hrs. a week went to the steamie once a week and lived in a hole in the wall in Guvin. She survived into her 80s with little complaint or regret. Today we have to balance mortgages, several bank accounts, and in my case work 6 days per. study 3 nights a week, attend courses at my employers request, purchase various cars, and finance them.

Relaxation is not something built into today's life style. It has to be earned. Many are obliged to take a second job if they want to raise a family and purchase properties. Labour saving gadgets we have an abundance of; but the must be financed. Unless you are sitting in a 2 bedroom council house and watching T.V. all day there are bills more so than there were in the 50s and 60s. Take T.V. as an example; video recorder, home theatre, computer interface, sound surround and instructions for each that require a degree in astro-physics to fully comprehend. And is there any out there who can get by without a computer Mobile or smart phone. We had no indoor toilet, bath house, etc. until I was 13. I now have 3 full on bath rooms with shower, bath tubs and cludgies, seven phones, two flat screen T.Vs. As I am retired now the stress is largely gone, however I have just seen to $10,000 worth of repairs to my home and arranging all the contractors involved was rather stressful. Our parents, if you are of my generation may have worked long and hard however much we take for granted now was not on the table then.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rab
post 2nd May 2015, 05:56pm
Post #69


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 11,356
Joined: 17th Aug 2012
From: STILL opposite the Golf Club!.
Member No.: 13,266
Billy, just reading that sparked a chain of thought in my head. How right you are.
During the war, my Dad was a merchant seaman, away dodging U-Boats and my Mammy brought up 2 boys from 1942 till they were 18. We survived living in a room and kitchen tenement flat, sharing a toilet with 2 other families. No hot running water, no TV etc. All we had for entertainment was a wet-battery valve radio and the Beano and Dandy each week. Mammy scrubbed the landing stairs and close on alternate weeks, and shared the wash-house tub each Monday. How she managed it I don't know. All those Mums deserved medals just as much as the men.
When I hear my grandchild say she is bored .....!!!



--------------------
Back to using my original name... Rab
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
irrie
post 3rd May 2015, 11:06am
Post #70

Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 871
Joined: 22nd Jul 2010
Member No.: 8,735
QUOTE (Rab @ 2nd May 2015, 07:13pm) *
Billy, just reading that sparked a chain of thought in my head. How right you are.
During the war, my Dad was a merchant seaman, away dodging U-Boats and my Mammy brought up 2 boys from 1942 till they were 18. We survived living in a room and kitchen tenement flat, sharing a toilet with 2 other families. No hot running water, no TV etc. All we had for entertainment was a wet-battery valve radio and the Beano and Dandy each week. Mammy scrubbed the landing stairs and close on alternate weeks, and shared the wash-house tub each Monday. How she managed it I don't know. All those Mums deserved medals just as much as the men.
When I hear my grandchild say she is bored .....!!!

Could almost have been talking about my family Rab. How on earth mothers did it I will never know.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Betsy2009
post 3rd May 2015, 11:51am
Post #71

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,292
Joined: 21st Jun 2013
Member No.: 25,701
My little stepmum had that same mentality. She lived in a block of flats on a square landing - 4 flats to the landing - and stairs front and back.
They had a rota for hoovering the landing and sweeping then washing down the stairs to the next landing once a week, i.e. two sets of stairs.
When younger families moved in they'd be lucky if they just hoovered the landing.
My stepmum kept doing it till she was 89!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rab
post 4th May 2015, 08:04pm
Post #72


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 11,356
Joined: 17th Aug 2012
From: STILL opposite the Golf Club!.
Member No.: 13,266

She had a HOOVER??? huh.gif


--------------------
Back to using my original name... Rab
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Betsy2009
post 4th May 2015, 08:16pm
Post #73

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,292
Joined: 21st Jun 2013
Member No.: 25,701
Aye. She even had an electric cooker which she'd had for 40 years then complained when it stopped working properly.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
taurus
post 4th May 2015, 09:40pm
Post #74


City Key Holder
******
Posts: 539
Joined: 7th Feb 2012
From: Sydney Australia
Member No.: 12,391
we didn`t have carpets(true story) and I used to borrow a neighbour`s carpets and beat them over the railings out the back court,so I could look like "normal" folk.I was about 14.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Betsy2009
post 4th May 2015, 10:46pm
Post #75

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,292
Joined: 21st Jun 2013
Member No.: 25,701
Oh Taurus, that's so sad.
I remember beating carpets out the back but I couldn't tell you what was on the rest of the floor. Perhaps it was lino or just wooden floorboards. I don't think that kids really noticed or cared.
Funny how the modern fashion is floorboards and a rug when, in my day, if you had a fitted carpet you were really posh.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

7 Pages V  « < 3 4 5 6 7 >
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 3rd Aug 2020

All material in the site Glasgow Guide is copyright of the Glasgow Guide Organisation. This material is for your own private use only, and no part of the site may be reproduced, amended, modified, copied, or transmitted to third parties, by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. All rights reserved.

Glasgow Hotels: book cheap hotels in Glasgow online now.