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> Playing Balls Against Walls, ...and sheds
*Lynne Kumar*
post 7th Mar 2009, 04:50am
Post #46






Hey Everyone, I was just reading about kids games and all. Joyce Wilson and myself would play ball in the lobby. Always banging on Mrs McFarlanes wall to her kitchen. I remember we used to play near the midgies in the back. Those were the days. Does anyone remember Chinese burns? You had to be a tough kid to play that one. Boy did they hurt! Between climbing the trees in the woods behind us, knocking the door and running away and skooting in our cool skooters, we were hot kids! Ain't that right Joyce? Lynne
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Evan
post 2nd Apr 2009, 12:21pm
Post #47

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Posted this on another site; great reading all your posts, we DID have fun for nothing in those days!
GAMES? Long one this - could go on for hours
Three Jolly Welshmen - mentioned already
Kick the Can - different versions of this
Peevers - in sexist times even the boys did this (when they were young of course)
Cowboys & Indians - most of the movies at the ABC Minors were cowboy (Hopalong Cassidy?) as were most of the series on TV (Cisco Kid; Range Rider?)
Skipping - mentioned here as I can remember girl at either end of TWO long ropes spinning these round fast and other girls skipping in this "vortex". Too scary for uz boys!
Spinning tops - "One, two, three a learie"
Carts made out of wooden box and old pram wheels
Ha'penny placed on line between two pavement flags and you tried to knock this off the line
Generally, just balls against the tenement wall and the poor old lady who lived on the other side telling us off cos of the noise - we would run away for 5 mins then come back - "Oh golly gosh" as they say down here; we were really wild!
Concerts oot the back (of the tenement block)
Squibs in matchboxes scooting across puddles
Very loud bangers held while fizzing then flung at the girls
Letting off squib at top of tenement outside door of girlfriend (we wuz 13); running downstairs fast to find my "pals" had lit a banger in the close!
Hanging on the back of the coal lorry with our steel tipped heels scraping on the road
How sad what the kids of today do (or don't do!)
We were lucky that we had a park opposite but the park keeper would chase us off that into the street and the twice daily copper (remember they actually had legs then!) would chase us off the street and into the park
We were always out playing, shouting up for a "jeelie piece"
remember frozen "jubblys"? Penny ice lollies from the local shop?
Plus racing Dinky toys down the hill; fitba; even cricket; hide an seek; Monopoly in a tent on a summer's evening; 8 weeks holiday in the summer - it was always hot and sunny!

Evan
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petalpeeps
post 2nd Apr 2009, 12:33pm
Post #48


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Pity some of the old games dont come back ,kids would be a bit healthier and more entertained . The fresh air would also benefit a lot of the youngsters today .
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**maniloonie**
post 23rd Apr 2009, 11:28pm
Post #49






I remember all these games well, i loved playing doublers down in the back close also the ball in the stocking. Alot of the time was also spent swinging off the T shaped poles that held the washing lines down the back court and there was a fabulous tree up the back where we used to spend loads of time collecting bees and wasps in jam jars. Why do kids nowadays always complain there is nothing for them to do, we always managed and we always had a terrific time
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*Tas*
post 14th Aug 2009, 09:16am
Post #50






Can anyone remember the rhyme and the various stages of the 2 ball game.
I know it was straight aginst the wall, and there was a bounce once stage, and a under the leg, aournd the back, a turn around (around the world).
But can't remember them all or the sequence and the rhyme.

Used to love this as a kid and would occupy me for a whole afternoon, am now trying to teach my niece.
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dizzybint
post 21st Oct 2010, 01:38pm
Post #51

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The old grey mare she aint what she used to be
Aint what she used to be
Aint what she used to be
The old grey mare she aint what she used to be
Many many years ago banjo

Are you gaun to golf sir
No sir
Why sir
Because ave got the cold sir
Where didye catch the cold sir
Up the North Pole Sir
How many did you catch sir.

then you had to use one haun with two baws tae get a score..
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poolie
post 21st Oct 2010, 04:53pm
Post #52

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Thank you all for the laughs tears are rolling down my cheeks remembering all the nice songs we used to sing while playing them games.
also never forgotten a lad holding a banger [firework] ready to throw when well alight but waited too long and it went off in his hand.

of course as i have lived in england for 50years these games were never heard of.
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*Jackie Jones*
post 5th Feb 2016, 12:01am
Post #53






There used to be a song we sang for doublers. Something like...first leggy, second leggy, splits, back splits, jibby, wee birly, big birly...haha..don't remember the rest. Playground game too...Down in the meadow where the green grass grows...brilliant!
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*Grannieboots*
post 21st May 2016, 01:27pm
Post #54






I grew up in Angus and we also had seasons for things. I remember playing with the two hard rubber ball against a door, used the shed door at home. I can remember' that we had different ways of throwing the balls for each number from 1 to 9. And we would try to work our way up through them, and then do 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 etc etc till we got to 9-9.

Did anyone else do that and what were the actions for each number.

1 was underhand
2 was overhand

What were the rest? I know we did under one leg and then the other, bouncing the ball before it hit the door, behind our back, up in the air, and clap.

We used to have a skipping season, when someone would bring a long rope and we would take turns to ca' it while the rest would jump in and skip to the rhymes, that we'd sing. If you stopped the rope you took a turn on the end of the rope. Boys would play too!

I have no idea who worked out what seasonal game we should play, but it suddenly happened!
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Alex MacPhee
post 21st May 2016, 08:37pm
Post #55


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QUOTE (AnneTeak @ 27th Feb 2009, 07:13pm) *
I remember singing a song that went along the lines of...
"something something ..battle fields were covered in blood huh.gif
there I spied a wounded soldier lying dying saying these words..
Bless my home in Bonnie Scotland bless my wife and only child bless ..something something"

I'm a late arrival to this one, but I remember my mother singing this to me when I was a small boy.

The day was done the war was over,
The battlefield was red with blood,
And there I spied a brave old soldier,
Lying dying as he cried,
God bless my home in Bonnie Scotland,
God bless my wife and only child,
I fought for Scotland's independence,
Oh bring me back ...

My mother usually followed it with "... the Union Jack" or "... my Uncle Jack", clearly a line not from the original.

I can still hear the tune in my head!


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Alex
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*Billy Boil*
post 1st Jun 2016, 08:41pm
Post #56






QUOTE (Grannieboots @ 21st May 2016, 01:27pm) *
I grew up in Angus and we also had seasons for things. I remember playing with the two hard rubber ball against a door, used the shed door at home. I can remember' that we had different ways of throwing the balls for each number from 1 to 9. And we would try to work our way up through them, and then do 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 etc etc till we got to 9-9.

Did anyone else do that and what were the actions for each number.

1 was underhand
2 was overhand

What were the rest? I know we did under one leg and then the other, bouncing the ball before it hit the door, behind our back, up in the air, and clap.

We used to have a skipping season, when someone would bring a long rope and we would take turns to ca' it while the rest would jump in and skip to the rhymes, that we'd sing. If you stopped the rope you took a turn on the end of the rope. Boys would play too!

I have no idea who worked out what seasonal game we should play, but it suddenly happened!

There was a game we played in Govan; at the foot of the old sandstone tenements there was a ledge 2 feet of the ground about the width of a tennis ball. The game was from a kneeling position on the far edge of the pavement to throw a ball, striking the ledge so that the ball would return to your hand and not touch the pavement. There was a name for it but it now escapes me. Hours of summer fun for the price of an old much used ball. All our games and toys were self sourced from used and discarded items.

Look around you any where and you will see weans to adults frantically exercising their index fingers on mobile "devises" staring at tiny screens in the weird hope beyond belief that they are interacting and being made part of the known universe.
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GG
post 1st Jun 2016, 08:50pm
Post #57


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Hi Billy,

Sounds like a short-range version of a game I'm sure you are familiar with: we called it Kerby.

Regarding your second point: this is a generation walking into the abyss with its head forced down into these tiny screens by corporate giants. If you have time, read a book called The Shallows; it's truly frightening in terms of the extensive scientific data (even a half a decade ago) that now backs up the belief that the uncontrolled, rampant overuse of the digital medium is depriving huge swathes of the population the ability to concentrate and think deeply.

GG.


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taurus
post 1st Jun 2016, 10:27pm
Post #58


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QUOTE (Jackie Jones @ 5th Feb 2016, 10:01am) *
There used to be a song we sang for doublers. Something like...first leggy, second leggy, splits, back splits, jibby, wee birly, big birly...haha..don't remember the rest. Playground game too...Down in the meadow where the green grass grows...brilliant!

here`s what I remember with my 77 year old memory.
1 2 3 a leggy,456 a leggy 789 a leggy 10 a leggy ,out of it.Then over to the left leg,same again.3rd stage,make the feet at "quarter to three" and sing 123 wee bridgie and so on ,to out of it. stage four,the left leg is contorted over to make a bridge,then 123 big bridgie etc,same with the right leg big bridgie for that too. the final was 123 big birly,not easy to catch the ball after that big spin round. And...the boys all like to stand around for big birly for obvious reasons,dirty wee devils.Oh to be 8 or 9 again !!.
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*Billy Boil*
post 15th Jun 2016, 09:35pm
Post #59






QUOTE (GG @ 1st Jun 2016, 08:50pm) *
Hi Billy,

Sounds like a short-range version of a game I'm sure you are familiar with: we called it Kerby.

Regarding your second point: this is a generation walking into the abyss with its head forced down into these tiny screens by corporate giants. If you have time, read a book called The Shallows; it's truly frightening in terms of the extensive scientific data (even a half a decade ago) that now backs up the belief that the uncontrolled, rampant overuse of the digital medium is depriving huge swathes of the population the ability to concentrate and think deeply.

GG.

Yesterday when I was in the local French bakery/café, I observed a woman frantically, and the only description I can convey to you was that she was "screaming" with her fingers and a pointer at an electronic com. device.

Apart from it being exceeding rude in a restaurant context it looked positively manic. This desire to be "seen" to be as being important enough to be constantly in touch with a nebulous presence on the digital anti social network can be seen in the proliferation of selfies (I.E. look at ME!).

Like dynamite, it was meant to be a blessing to the human race, and in many instances it is a valuable and irreplaceable tool. However like dynamite in the hands of children and dysfunctional "adults" it is a positive menace.
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