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> Shipyards At War
dugald_old
post 21st Dec 2013, 12:03am
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Interesting reminder of the Affray tragedy Rab. I recall it quite well, especially the loss of Lt.Cdr. Lionel 'Buster' Crabbe. Poor 'Buster' I think, got himself caught by the Soviet navy. Oh I suppose it could simply have been an accident, like having got caught up in the propellors of the Soviet ship he was likely having a look at... but I don't think so, and I don't think the rest of the world did either. We won't ever find out for sure until the "who cares" time arrives. It was a bit of an embarrassment for the British government too. If I remember correctly though, Kruschöv didn't dwell on it too much, when he could easily have gloated about it. Crabbe was one of our really topnotch undercover types and I'm sure very much missed. A tough business to be in.
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dugald_old
post 21st Dec 2013, 12:19am
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An interesting wee story Danny. Although I don't recall the successes of the football teams, I recall quite clearly the period during the war, probably about 1942/43, when a number of Navy Cadet "ships", all named after King George V class battleships, started in the West of Scotland. There was also one called the "Anson" started in the school up beside the Westway Cinema at the top of Berryknowes Road. I tried to join it, but when I arrived at the school to join there was a queue a mile long waiting to join.... my pal, who had jumped the gun (some pal!), managed to get in and I finished up wearing a kilt in the 6th Btn HLI in Bridgton!

Quite an achievement for the postwar "Howe" to make the football final at Wembly. I never heard of the "Howe" in Scotland , but I'm sure there would have been one around Govan where she was built. Maybe they should have called the team the "Weir Pumps" team.
Interesting stuff Danny.
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dugald_old
post 21st Dec 2013, 12:33am
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Yes Rab, it really is astounding when one realises just how many ships were built on the Clyde during the war: 994 for the Royal Navy and 503 for the Merchant Navy (nearly 1500 vessels !!!).Wow! It really is unbelievable!

I would think the R.N. total would include the construction of landing craft. During the days just prior to D-Day I think every piece of land on the banks of the Clyde around Glasgow that weren't already in use were used to build landing craft. Across the Clyde from Harland's in Govan for example, actually in Partick, the waste ground there started building barges and landing craft. I don't know where the got the men and women to build them. It seemed there were finished barges and landing craft sailing down the Clyde every day.
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Rab
post 21st Dec 2013, 07:04pm
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Another Renfrew-built naval ship of interest was HMS SALVIA, a Flower Class Corvette escort ship. She was built at Wm. Simons yard and launched in 1941. On 24th December that year she was under the command of Lt Cdr John Miller DSO DSC RNR and escorting a convoy in the Med. near Tobruk. One of the convoy was a British ship the SS SHUNTIEN which was carrying 70 crew members, 18 gunners and 850-1100 prisoners of war. At around 1900hrs the Shuntien was torpedoed by U559 and quickly sank. HMS Salvia at great risk, stopped to rescue survivors but was then torpedoed by U568, soon sinking with the loss of all her officers and crew and those rescued from the Shuntien. Nothing was ever seen again of the Shuntien or Salvia.
This disaster has echoes of the Arandora Star in similar circumstances.

An interesting footnote to this sad loss was that the U559 was captured by the Royal Navy later the following year in the Atlantic and whilst being searched, an Enigma coding device was found, the first to come into British hands. This enabled British code-breakers to gather intelligence which led to the destruction of many 'wolf-pack' U-boats over the later war years, thereby saving the lives of many convoy personnel.

May 27, 1942-The U568 (mentioned above) came under depth charge attack from British destroyers Hero, Hurworth, Eridge after being attacked unsuccessfully by British aircraft.
May 28, 1942-The U568 is sunk after 16 hours of depth charge attacks, all 47 crew survived.


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Rab
post 21st Dec 2013, 07:19pm
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The tug 'WILLIAM C. DALDY' was built in 1935 by Lobnitz & Co in Renfrew for the Aukland Harbour Board in New Zealand. It took 12 weeks to steam to her home port from Renfrew in 1936. The WCD is still afloat as a preserved pleasure craft and is a fitting memorial to Lobnitz-built craft.
She berthed HMS Achilles on its return to Aukland after taking part in the battle of the River Plate and the end of the Graf Spee.
There are some excellent photos in this link showing her on the Lobnitz ways during and after her construction which may be of interest to some. (Try and ignore the newspaper report of her 'arriving in Aukland from England!)

http://daldy.com/category/history/construction/


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Rab
post 21st Dec 2013, 07:46pm
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This website is my favourite in showing Clyde shipyards throughout their history and the photos are outstanding in quality. Dugald will, I am sure, enjoy the views of his old Govan.

http://www.glasgowhistory.com/sailing-down...r%E2%80%9D.html


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DannyH
post 21st Dec 2013, 11:59pm
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QUOTE (dugald @ 21st Dec 2013, 12:36am) *
An interesting wee story Danny. Although I don't recall the successes of the football teams, I recall quite clearly the period during the war, probably about 1942/43, when a number of Navy Cadet "ships", all named after King George V class battleships, started in the West of Scotland. There was also one called the "Anson" started in the school up beside the Westway Cinema at the top of Berryknowes Road. I tried to join it, but when I arrived at the school to join there was a queue a mile long waiting to join.... my pal, who had jumped the gun (some pal!), managed to get in and I finished up wearing a kilt in the 6th Btn HLI in Bridgton!

Quite an achievement for the postwar "Howe" to make the football final at Wembly. I never heard of the "Howe" in Scotland , but I'm sure there would have been one around Govan where she was built. Maybe they should have called the team the "Weir Pumps" team.
Interesting stuff Danny.


Hello again Dugald

Thank you for the reply. This is completely off the topic, but they couldn't name the team "Weir Pumps", for two reasons. Weir Pumps didn't exist in those days. The company was still known as G&J Weir. The second reason is that Weir's football team played in the 1st Division of the Scottish Amateur League. They won the Scottish Amateur Cup around about 1953/54 at Hampden Park.

Best regards to All

Danny Harris
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dugald_old
post 22nd Dec 2013, 02:04pm
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http://www.glasgowhistory.com/sailing-down...r%E2%80%9D.html

Rab, I watched your 'Glasgow History site--- in a word, Fantastic! Some great pictures there, most of which I readily identified. The only other thing I want to say about it, is that it's one heck of a user of time: once I started on it I couldn't stop. Mind you, there are a lot worse ways to spend a Saturday evening, great entertainment Rab!
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*Billy Boil*
post 23rd Dec 2013, 09:44am
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QUOTE (Rab @ 17th Dec 2013, 02:50pm) *
Simons-Lobnitz as a company was dissolved in the early 60s but cases of asbestos-related diseases ie. mesothelioma etc. were being pursued right into the late 80s by former workers of the company who had worked on mainly pipe-lagging with asbestos.

My auntie Agnes worked there right up to closing down. She died of a malignant cancer but she also smoked heavilly. She was a French polisher and there were issues of the harmfull effects of spraying polish. Workers health was never a concern in the yards. When a workmate of ours died in the joiners shop in Fairfield from infected rats piss (in his billy can) it was ruled misadventure and somehow there was no blame attached to the filthy conditions that were allowed to exist. To remedy the situation they had a labourer hose down the area and made me "whitewash" the rotten woodwork.
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wellfield
post 26th Dec 2013, 06:19am
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Great site Rab!!!!!!!
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