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Glasgow Boards/Forums _ General Chit Chat _ The Poppy

Posted by: auldbutcher 14th Nov 2010, 12:47pm

Hi troops it's me agin on remembrance day i want tae pay tribute tae the British army who fae 1939 an on wards wis ill equipt and sent oot tae defend the kingdom wie pea shooters.

Jasus the sten jerry equivalent the schmeisser ,tank's the cromwell,an the sherman,mass produced .crap there is a story that ah panzer major caught a brigade o shermans in ah narrow defile he whacks oot the leadin sherman an then whacks oot the last wan ,then tae his leisure bumps the rest o them aff.

Me i have got a bloomin history boot baith sides o my family uncle Neil who lost ah leg in the first world war. uncle Willie who died on the beaches on d'day a sergeant who was blowing tae kingdom come ,uncle Bert who went ower a land mine despatch rider ,cousin and brother in law who served time in Malaya ,an KOREA . Scum bag muslim's are allowed tae bemirch ah ceremony tae these hero's memory me i ask what has happened tae oor country ,turn the other cheek as mah auld daddy used tae say an get a mediteranin tan son .

P.s listen tae the corries singin willie mc bride.you don't shed a tear then you got a heart o stane

Posted by: Anne1 14th Nov 2010, 01:24pm

I watched the Remembrance Festival last night and it always brings tears to my eyes of all the Lovely young Men & Women who gave their lives for me and mine and this morning we also sat and watched the Parade in London, it always reduces me to Tears and then watching all the other Veterans Parading how can you not be moved,And as for the Scum at Celtic Park[am a tic supporter] they should be hounded and banned no exceptions send those Cretins to war see how loudly they would Scream

Posted by: wee davy 14th Nov 2010, 01:41pm

I would rather line them up in front of a few Taliban, annwan - but as a minimum, I'm sure Celtic FC will take the ultimate sanctions against those responsible for such shameful behaviour.

God Bless ALL those who have been affected by conflict, loss & suffering.

There were MANY hundreds attended both the open air service and village church. Very good to see.

davy

Posted by: jamjar51 14th Nov 2010, 01:49pm

Wee Davy don't haud yer breath waiting for any action to be taken

Posted by: Rab 14th Nov 2010, 02:09pm

QUOTE (jamjar51 @ 14th Nov 2010, 02:35pm) *
Wee Davy don't haud yer breath waiting for any action to be taken


Officially, maybe you might be right Jamjar, but, covertly, you might get some satisfaction as we all would from some erse-kicking by some of our undercover boys in khaki. The towelheaded goon in the Mail photo would be well advised to disappear for a while as he was quite indentifiable! Just watch this space ! They are not prepared to take this lying down!

Posted by: Heather 14th Nov 2010, 06:43pm

The Green Fields of France

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyiLfSHSqds

Well, how ya doing, young Willie McBride?
Do you mind if I sit here, down by your graveside?
And l rest for a while in the warm summer sun,
I've been walking all day, Lord, and I'm nearly done.
I see by your gravestone, you were only nineteen,
When you joined the great war in 1916.
Well I hope you died quick and I hoped you died clean.
Or Willie McBride, was it slow and obscene?

Did they beat the drum slowly?
Did they sound the fife lowly?
Did the rifles fire o'er ye as they lowered ye down?
Did the band play the last Post and chorus?
Did the pipes play the Fleurs o' the Forest?

And did you leave a wife or a sweetheart behind?
In some faithful heart is your memory enshrined?
And though you died back in 1916,
To that loyal heart, are you always 19?
Or are you a stranger, without even a name,
Forever enshrined behind some glass pane,
In an old photograph, torn, 'n' tattered and stained,
And fading to yellow in a brown leather frame?

Well the sun's shining now on these Green Fields of France.
The warm wind blows gently and the red poppies dance.
The trenches have vanished long under the plough.
No gas and no barbed wire, no guns firing now.
But here in this graveyard it's still No Man's Land,
The countless white crosses in mute witness stand.
To man's blind indifference to his fellow man,
And a whole generation who were butchered and damned.

And I can't help but wonder now Willie McBride,
Do all those who lie here, really know why they died?
Did you really believe them when they told you the cause?
Did you really believe that this war would end wars?
The suffering, the sorrow, the glory, the shame,
The killing, the dying, it was all done in vain.
For Willie McBride it all happened again,
And again and again and again and again.

Posted by: Anne1 14th Nov 2010, 07:04pm

How so very very Sad sad.gif sad.gif

Posted by: nelli 14th Nov 2010, 08:14pm

I wrote this poem for my Great Uncle Peter McKay, killed in France, October 1918 he was 23. My Maternal Grandfather's brother.

Peter McKay

I never knew the man I mourn
Yet still I’m sad
His body wracked and battle worn
While he was still a lad

From Glasgow town he heard the call
Your country needs you now
Off he went with heart and soul
The trenches he will plough

I stand here 90 long years on
In grief, for my unknown kin
His name etched on a Portland stone
Being brave his only sin

His battles over, here he lies
But he is not alone
Another million lie nearby
For them the battles done.

He was but one of many to die
A Scot, steadfast and true
23 years old was Peter Mckay
When the final whistle blew

RIP all of you, we will not forget.

Posted by: auchenshuggle 14th Nov 2010, 08:58pm

lovely poem nelli, im sure he`s looking doon on ye and smiling, saying thanks for such kind words.

Posted by: Heather 14th Nov 2010, 10:28pm

Jings Nelli, you have me in tears reading the poem you wrote to your great Uncle Peter.

It is very sad, especially as he was killed as the war was ending.

Posted by: nelli 14th Nov 2010, 11:01pm

Thank you Heather & Auchenshuggle, he was only one of millions but he was my one.

Posted by: Anne1 14th Nov 2010, 11:26pm

lovely tribute to the Uncle who never came back

Posted by: big al 14th Nov 2010, 11:48pm

do we really need to wear a poppy to remember the dead?

when I was 11 one of my best friends died - when I was 17 one of my best friends died in Aden in the army when his jeep was blown up - he only wanted to be in the band - when I was 20 a good friend was killed in Israel fighting for his country - when I was 21 a frend took a gun and killed himself because he could not take life the way it was - since then I have lost many friend and family to normal death and disease and accidents etc etc - a couple of weeks ago I lost a cousin who was murdered in Glasgow by some numpty on drugs ......

Do I need to wear a poppy to remember them all - of course I don't - I do wear a poppy out of respect for those who gave their lives to their country - but not for them as individuals - that's too much to ask me....and I cannot get sentimental about all of those who died - it was before my time but I respect them and those who loved them

Posted by: nelli 15th Nov 2010, 12:03am

That is your choice BigAl and I respect that.

Posted by: wee davy 15th Nov 2010, 12:26am

http://www.poppy.org.uk/

lets not forget the poppy appeal is as much (if not more) to do with the living - than the dead.

but i take your point al

its not merely a 'once a year' thing
- or simply all about those who died in the great wars (never did really understand the term 'great' - what exactly was 'great' about it?)

sorry to hear about your cousin - we had a young fella down here, kicked to death up here (hartlepool i think it was) not so long ago - just got back from afghanistan. probably drugs/drink related. yet another war we often seem to be losing!

but on a positive note - it was nice to see so many people turn out as a mark of their respect, today, at my local rememberance service - both in and OUT of the church - be they religious or nay.

goodnight all

(thanks for your posts girls xx)

Posted by: Heather 15th Nov 2010, 12:33am

Al, I understand what you are getting at.

We have all lost family and friends we were close to and have cried rivers over them and like you think about them often. But I think it is only right we should wear a Poppy which I do every year, and remember at this time of the year those who died giving their lives for this Country.

Freedom is not free, remember those who died for it.

Posted by: Anne1 15th Nov 2010, 12:46am

I totally agree with you Heather, after all the Poppy is a mark of respect for those who gave their lives and freedom so that we could have ours, so little to give them in return

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 15th Nov 2010, 01:28am

Poppy day is a strange day for me over here in Germany; and I don't mean because I'm on the other side of the Rhein unsure.gif but because of how the Germans celebrate the 11th of the 11th ... they party!
I do appreciate and respect Poppy day and honour the 2 minutes silence in respect of those fallen in wars ... and because of them; I had a young Scottish, catholic, mate who had been in Belfast with the British Army and he used to tell me of his torment over there as a catholic in British uniform.
He overdosed in Bayern, in the Winter Olympics village of Lengries.
But Tommy died earlier in Belfast.
I Remember him too on the 11th of the 11th.

But over here the 11th of the 11th represents the start of fasching; a carnival period of Christian tradition with Germanic and Celtic roots, which ends somewhere in February/March depending on area. So you watch the news and see the Cenotaph and 2 minutes silence then a minute later you're watchin' thousands of people up in Cologne gettin smashed at the beginning of fasching.

Understandably; I suppose, it's only in the last few short years that Germans openly honour their war dead (Iraq and Afghanistan brought that on) but the only meaning that the 11th of the 11th has for a German is the start of the winter fasching. I like fasching and the meaning behind it but I do wish they could settle for a different starting date.
Every year when it comes around I get from Mary, I know, I know ... it's the moment when you in Britain... she's heard it that often.

Posted by: tombro 15th Nov 2010, 09:38am

Heather,

Your words were written by expat Scot Eric Bogle and have been recorded by artists from all over the world. I first heard them on a Fureys Album I bought many years ago and, as I've just pointed out on the Sing Song Topic, I've just finished teaching the song to my class at school.

Eric Bogle also wrote the song 'And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda', yet another song I love introducing the kids in my class to, each year.

You can listen to both on the Sing Song Topic.

Please enjoy !

Tombro rolleyes.gif

Posted by: wee davy 15th Nov 2010, 11:03am

Interesting wee postscript, tombro - have you noticed the new member from your part of the world, who's just come on? (In where in Glasgow are you from?) Aussie Don
You appear to already have a bit in common.

Posted by: auldbutcher 30th Nov 2010, 11:01am

Hi tombro i once had that song on tape sang by Liam Clancy and Tommy Makim its a haunting story aboot a young devil may care aussie lad who in the words o the song waltzed his matilda all over ,I think its aboot the action on Suva Bay where the Turks decimated a commonwealth force .

Any wies he is maimed fer life i.e ''i looked at the place where my legs used tae be no more waltzing Matilda fer me'' sad sad song ,i have a great dread just now i have 5 grandson's 4 who are of an age where if conscription was to be reintroduced these young men could end up in this farce o a war that is going on in the middle east.

There is also the threat of war in Korea where an auld decrepit egomaniac dwarf is sabre rattling this would also be a conflict we would end up fighting in ,i had an aulder cousin Alistair Rae who fought in the last stushie ower there he was never the same man when he came back, man its wan helluva world. P.s tombro my wee song was lost when my tape recorder chewed it up ,have searched fer it noo fer many years withoot sucess .

Posted by: Heather 30th Nov 2010, 05:31pm

Aye Tombro, I heard 'Waltzing Matilda ' years ago, the words always seems to me to be a very true.

Posted by: tombro 1st Dec 2010, 09:23am

For Auldbutcher, Heather and all of those who have contributed to this post !

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WG48Ftsr3OI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrQnnZJ68Xo

Long may we remember them,
Lest we forget !

Tombro






Posted by: auldbutcher 1st Dec 2010, 11:24am

Thank you tombro fer that site.

And amen tae that lest we forget

Posted by: Dunvegan 26th Jan 2011, 08:59am

QUOTE (tombro @ 15th Nov 2010, 07:16pm) *
Heather,

Your words were written by expat Scot Eric Bogle and have been recorded by artists from all over the world. I first heard them on a Fureys Album I bought many years ago and, as I've just pointed out on the Sing Song Topic, I've just finished teaching the song to my class at school.

Eric Bogle also wrote the song 'And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda', yet another song I love introducing the kids in my class to, each year.

You can listen to both on the Sing Song Topic.

Please enjoy !

Tombro rolleyes.gif

I've still got the original Bushwhackers album,(circa 1976) when the song was first aired. I knew an Eric Bogle who was a folk singer in Scotland. I dont know if they are one and the same. The Eric Bogle came to Australia in about the same decade as myself.

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 11th Nov 2011, 01:16pm

QUOTE (Heather @ 14th Nov 2010, 06:09pm) *
The Green Fields of France

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyiLfSHSqds

Well, how ya doing, young Willie McBride?
Do you mind if I sit here, down by your graveside?
And l rest for a while in the warm summer sun,
I've been walking all day, Lord, and I'm nearly done.
I see by your gravestone, you were only nineteen,
When you joined the great war in 1916.
Well I hope you died quick and I hoped you died clean.
Or Willie McBride, was it slow and obscene?

Did they beat the drum slowly?
Did they sound the fife lowly?
Did the rifles fire o'er ye as they lowered ye down?
Did the band play the last Post and chorus?
Did the pipes play the Fleurs o' the Forest?

And did you leave a wife or a sweetheart behind?
In some faithful heart is your memory enshrined?
And though you died back in 1916,
To that loyal heart, are you always 19?
Or are you a stranger, without even a name,
Forever enshrined behind some glass pane,
In an old photograph, torn, 'n' tattered and stained,
And fading to yellow in a brown leather frame?

Well the sun's shining now on these Green Fields of France.
The warm wind blows gently and the red poppies dance.
The trenches have vanished long under the plough.
No gas and no barbed wire, no guns firing now.
But here in this graveyard it's still No Man's Land,
The countless white crosses in mute witness stand.
To man's blind indifference to his fellow man,
And a whole generation who were butchered and damned.

And I can't help but wonder now Willie McBride,
Do all those who lie here, really know why they died?
Did you really believe them when they told you the cause?
Did you really believe that this war would end wars?
The suffering, the sorrow, the glory, the shame,
The killing, the dying, it was all done in vain.
For Willie McBride it all happened again,
And again and again and again and again.

The link below shows the sad story of a Lincolnshire mother who lost 5 sons in "The Great War to end all wars"

QUOTE
Eventually the newspapers picked up the story of Mrs Beechey’s fivefold bereavement. In April 1918 she was presented to King George V and Queen Mary. When the Queen commented on her great sacrifice, she responded: ‘It was no sacrifice, Ma’am. I did not give them willingly.

Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2060179/Armistice-Day-2011-The-mother-lost-sons-WW1.html#ixzz1dOpn3CHm

Posted by: Tam C 11th Nov 2011, 10:50pm

QUOTE (Dunvegan @ 26th Jan 2011, 09:25am) *
I've still got the original Bushwhackers album,(circa 1976) when the song was first aired. I knew an Eric Bogle who was a folk singer in Scotland. I dont know if they are one and the same. The Eric Bogle came to Australia in about the same decade as myself.

Hi Dunvegan
It's the same man a great singer/writer .I think I've every album he made and if you get a chance to see him live you wont regret it
Cheers Tam C

Posted by: tamhickey 12th Nov 2011, 06:03am

What's happened to AuldButcher? Haven't seen him here for months?

Posted by: GG 12th Nov 2011, 11:35am

QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 11th Nov 2011, 12:42pm) *
The link below shows the sad story of a Lincolnshire mother who lost 5 sons in "The Great War to end all wars".

THH, I read that story yesterday and thought how that poor woman must have suffered for such a bloody, stupid war that had no meaning or reason, except the organised mass slaughter of a generation of young men just to appease the stupidity and vanity of the ruling class.

How sad it is also, that today we live in a country where there is an epidemic of thefts of war memorials, just so that the thieves can sell them for scrap to take advantage of inflated metal prices.

GG,

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 12th Nov 2011, 11:51am

QUOTE
Well I hope you died quick and I hoped you died clean.
Or Willie McBride, was it slow and obscene?

It was obscene.

Laying the blame:

http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/balkan_causes.htm
QUOTE
Few issues in modern history have received as much attention as assigning blame for the outbreak of the World War in 1914. The debate began during the war itself as each side tried to lay blame on the other, became part of the "war guilt" question after 1918, went through a phase of revisionism in the 1920s, and was revived in the 1960s thanks to the work of Fritz Fischer.

This lecture also deals with the causes of World War I, but does so from a Balkan perspective. Certainly Great Power tensions were widespread in 1914, and those tensions caused the rapid spread of the war after it broke out, but many previous Great Power crises had been resolved without war. Why did this particular episode, a Balkan crisis that began with a political murder in Bosnia, prove so unmanageable and dangerous?



Posted by: Rab 12th Nov 2011, 08:49pm

Aye, Gavrilo Princip had a lot to answer for.

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 13th Nov 2011, 12:44am

His name was fate.

Posted by: Tommy Kennedy 13th Nov 2011, 01:27am

I have mixed feelings on 'Poppy day' - hesitated to post, not wishing to offend those who have lost family in conflicts.

The 'Establishment' does FORGET: In the present day we have an almost daily drip of our young men being killed in Afganistan - an obscene waste of life while the establishment tries to work out a 'face saving plan' to get the hell outa there.
Then we had the aggressive wars -post WW2 of our Establishment trying to hang on to it's remmants of Empire, particulary Cyprus/Malaya - telling us we were fighting commies or terrorists-LIES - many of our young conscripts killed.

Nor do I think the British Legion takes on the government enough on behalf of our service men, particulary the serious wounded.

My Father's best friend was an old soldier called 'Casey'-WW1
He lived in extreme poverty in a single end slum. He only had one arm and limped badly. Always had a terrible cough - Father said it was because he had been gassed WW1 - always wore a big overcoat summer/winter. He would come to our house often- was very clever at 'cartoon drawing'.
Using a clip board he would make drawings of cartoon charactors for us kids - always had a great sense of humour.
One day at school we had to make our own poppys - I came home wearing mine; Casey was in the house: 'Look' I said proudly,'This is for us to remember those that gave their lifes for us' - THe first time I saw Casey show anger:
'Don't wearr that poppy, son, it gloryfies war' Casey said.
'Aye, my Father said, 'it costs them nothing to remember the dead' but they forget the likes of you, you're too costly for them'
I have never worn a poppy, for when I see them I have a visoun of old Casey.
I also remember how Brit service men were treated in Korea, poor equipemt, lousy conditions, lousy food, tho I didn't suffer that as I was attached to the G.Is

Those of my generation will remember ex-wounded service men, of WW1 in Glasgow town centere selling matches or boot laces.
Aye, remember how those ex service men that survived WW1 were treated while General Haig was given a half million pounds by a grateful Brit Esatblishment - but of course the 'Dead' were rememberd!


Posted by: Isobel 13th Nov 2011, 03:00am

I always wear the poppy. To remember those who served ,the ones who did not come home and also the ones who did.To me its like saying thank you for your courage and for serving your country.
The money from the sale of these poppies also helps young folks who need artificial limbs.

Posted by: angel 13th Nov 2011, 04:08am

Why the Poppy?
Today, fields of brilliant poppies still grow in France.
A writer first made the connection between the poppy and battlefield deaths during the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th century, remarking that fields that were barren before battle exploded with the blood-red flowers after the fighting ended.

During the tremendous bombardments of the First World War the chalk soils became rich in lime from rubble, allowing 'popaver rhoeas' to thrive. When the war ended the lime was quickly absorbed, and the poppy began to disappear again.

After John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields was published in 1915 the poppy became a popular symbol for soldiers who died in battle.

Three years later an American, Moina Michael, was working in a New York City YMCA canteen when she started wearing a poppy in memory of the millions who died on the battlefield.

During a 1920 visit to the United States a French woman, Madame Guerin, learned of the custom. On her return to France she decided to use handmade poppies to raise money for the destitute children in war-torn areas of the country. In November, 1921, the first poppies were distributed in Canada.

Thanks to the millions of Canadians who wear flowers each November, the little red plant has never died. And neither have Canadian's memories for 116,031 of their countrymen who died in battle.

Posted by: angel 13th Nov 2011, 05:03am

QUOTE
In Flanders Fields
by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


Birth: November 30, 1872 in Guelph, Ontario
Death: January 28, 1918 in Boulogne, France
Education:
• BA - University of Toronto 1894
• Bachelor of Medicine - University of Toronto 1898
•Interned at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland
Professions:
John McCrae was a doctor, soldier, poet and artist.

Posted by: jeep 13th Nov 2011, 09:06am

Angel, Loved the poem and the information on the Poppy smile.gif

Jeep

Posted by: Tommy Kennedy 13th Nov 2011, 10:47am

QUOTE (Isobel @ 13th Nov 2011, 03:26am) *
I always wear the poppy. To remember those who served ,the ones who did not come home and also the ones who did.To me its like saying thank you for your courage and for serving your country.
The money from the sale of these poppies also helps young folks who need artificial limbs.


I agree with your sentiments, Isobel.
But the seriously wounded should not have to rely on charity for help That is obscene.
Many of our service men are still treated in Army parlance 'For the use of' - the use of politicians plans/wishes.
We have parades for returning 'fit' soldiers; if we had parades of the seriouly maimed for life it would make us more anti- war as our fellow euro countries are.- they suffered much more WW1 & WW2 than U.K. did.
In no way are our young men 'serving our country' in Afghanistan but creating another generation of Afghanistan civilians hating us. Britain had colonial war experiance in the past in Afghanistan - and 'we' were the aggressors then and should know better now. If Russia could not 'conqeur' Afghanistan no one can. War is a way of life for Afghanistan and a country cannot change, be forced to change from 'outside'. As was said in Viet-nam; who will be the last squaddie to die while the politicains come up with a 'face saving plan' to get out of Afghanistan.

It could be said it's understandable the U.S., having no experience of 'colonia'l wars, other than dominating South pacific islands in the 19th- early 20th century, believing that with superior techonolgy/weapons they could defeat, bring about change in other countries, but the U.K did have experience, even post WW2 when they tried and failed, with superior techonlogy/waepons to hold on to remants of empire -even on our doorstep - N.Ireland,- the I.R.A. they learned the hard way the I.R.A. could not be militerary defeated.

The object of going in to Afghanistan was 'Right' - by U.S. - to destroy terrorist training camps; that was accomplished by 'Air power' and can be continued to be accomplished air power.
The 'boots on ground' only gives the well experienced Afghanistans 'targets of hit and run'

I would have more respect for the 'British Legion' if they called for an end to the obscene waste of life of our young men in Afghanistan.

Posted by: Tommy Kennedy 13th Nov 2011, 11:15am

P.S. - I would add, as we are seeing in the Arab world, that it is education, modern technology, communications that free people from oppresive regimes - not interferance by other nations. As I've posted before, it is more difficult now for 'States' to have complete control over 'propoganda' as they had in yester year. Even the mobile phone with a camera and the internet gets news out of the Syrian uprising -that could all be 'hidden' to the world in yesteryear!!!

Posted by: angel 13th Nov 2011, 05:02pm



Royal Canadian Legion
CANADA’S LARGEST VETERANS ORGANIZATION

There are many veterans’ organizations in Canada but the largest by far is The Royal Canadian Legion with over 358,000 members and affiliates. The members belong to the following membership categories:

Ordinary (serving and retired military, RCMP personnel, provincial and municipal police forces);
Associate (direct relative of an ordinary member, cadet instructors, cadets, Navy League officers, firefighters); and
Affiliates (voting and non-voting friends of the Legion).
In addition, there are approximately 40,000 registered members of the Ladies Auxiliary who provide invaluable support to the Branches of the Legion and their fundraising activities. Serving members of the Canadian Forces may also join the “Military Member-At-Large” branch or a regular active branch.

The Legion is a non-profit, dues-supported, fraternal organization with approximately 1,500 branches in Canada, the United States, Germany and The Netherlands. The Legion receives no financial assistance from any outside agency and membership is open to all Canadian citizens and Commonwealth subjects who subscribe to the purposes and objects of the organization.

From the time of its formation in 1926, the Legion has focused its efforts on the fight to secure adequate pensions and other well-earned benefits for veterans and their dependants. Acting as an advocacy agency on veterans’ behalf, the Legion deals directly with the Federal Government to ensure ex-military personnel and their dependants are treated fairly.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Royal Canadian Legion has also assumed a major responsibility for perpetuating the tradition of Remembrance in Canada. Each year the Legion organizes and runs the National Poppy Campaign to remind Canadians of the tremendous debt we owe to the 117,000 men and women who have given their lives in the defence of Canada during two world wars, the Korean War and other military missions around the world. Contributions made during the campaign are used to assist needy veterans, ex-service members and their families.

The Legion also supports programs for seniors, particularly through direct community-level activities, the Legion Long term care Surveyor Program and a Housing Program. The Legion’s Youth program provides scholarships and bursaries, sports programs and support to activities such as cadets, scouts and guides.


This aint too shabby ...



Posted by: angel 13th Nov 2011, 05:05pm


Angel, Loved the poem and the information on the Poppy

Jeep
You are welcome , Jeep smile.gif

Posted by: Jim D 13th Nov 2011, 11:58pm

Although I always wear the poppy, I remember that my father refused to wear one. NOT for the cause but in protest of the person the fund was named after - Earl Haig. Probably the biggest contributor to the deaths of the 1 world war.
It did not help things that he lost a brother on the 1st day of WW2. He had 2 brothers who were merchant seamen. On worked as a steward on the "rent run" Scotland to America. The other was on a ship on South America. The last of his "rent runs" was a sailing to Canada in the Athenia, the last ship to leave GB before war was declared. It was sank by a U-boat in the atlantic off the coast of Ireland 9 hrs after war was declared.
He opened the door when the dreaded telegram was delivered. My dad was 11yrs old at the time. The other brother heard of the sinking on the world news and heard that it had been a miraculous rescue with less than 200 deaths. A year later, he is returning from South America and is on the tram heading back to Govan when the clippy offered him her condolences. It was only then that he realised his young brother never made it. Mt father opened the door to his eldest brother, who was crying like a baby.

Posted by: angel 14th Nov 2011, 01:31am



Hi Jim D. I did'nt know that the Earl Haig fund was the same as the British Legion , I thought two seperate funds/organisations.
Also Jim ,there are I'm sure , many who can relate so many stories such as your own . sad.gif
Regarding Field Marshall Haig , it is just beyond comprehension , that he was allowed to continue with his madness and be the cause of hundreds of thousands of deaths all because he was on the biggest Ego trip ever in military history , " he and his horses ".

Posted by: Jim D 14th Nov 2011, 02:37pm

I remember years ago watching the film "Oh What A lovely War". It depicted the deaths on a cricket score board but the numbers were spinning like a stop watch. Earl Haig was on a wooden platform praying ..."god give me victory..........before the americans come!".

Posted by: Jim D 14th Nov 2011, 02:40pm

QUOTE (angel @ 14th Nov 2011, 01:57am) *
Hi Jim D. I did'nt know that the Earl Haig fund was the same as the British Legion , I thought two seperate funds/organisations.
Also Jim ,there are I'm sure , many who can relate so many stories such as your own . sad.gif
Regarding Field Marshall Haig , it is just beyond comprehension , that he was allowed to continue with his madness and be the cause of hundreds of thousands of deaths all because he was on the biggest Ego trip ever in military history , " he and his horses ".


Angel, I believe there was a merger and name change about 5 years ago and it is now called poppyscotland (in Scotland of course).

Posted by: wee davy 14th Nov 2011, 04:25pm

Old Casey

Interesting story, Tommy.

However I think he might agree the symbolism, and its sentiments these days, tend be very successful in bringing to the fore, the plight of those who DO require our thanks, and support.

He was right - of course - as your father was - back then. However The Poppy has since raised and done MORE THAN ANY OTHER the profile of servicemen & women, and their families.

I for one wear it with great pride, each year (though not this year, strangely enough!) - not so much because of its morbidity - but for what it means to the MAJORITY of the population. It is a symbol of HOPE, as much as anything, these days - hope that we do NOT forget those who pay the ULTIMATE price for us - but also that we DO NOT FORGET THE 'Old Casey's' of this world, EVER again.

More importantly, even if it gets an additional 1p in the 'kitty' - its done its job wink.gif
RIP Casey

Posted by: Rab 14th Nov 2011, 07:48pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kX_3y3u5Uo

Posted by: angel 15th Nov 2011, 01:02am

QUOTE (Rab @ 14th Nov 2011, 06:14pm) *
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kX_3y3u5Uo


It's so true Rab , it really does'nt take much
to give some thought .
Glad you posted this song. !


Posted by: angel 11th Nov 2016, 02:37pm

https://elledudds.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/poem-big.jpg


The poppy, the sale of the Poppy helps all of our vets .

Posted by: Dave Grieve 6th Nov 2017, 09:04pm

I have been wandering around Scotland since the end of June.
What I cant get my head around is the absense of Poppy sellers.
Years ago they were on just about every corner. This year anyway despite looking for one so I can buy I have not seen a single seller anywhere.

Posted by: taurus 6th Nov 2017, 11:51pm

perhaps the locals could tell you more about this,but I have a ringing bell somewhere in my memory,that there was some controversy about the poppy this year. i`d be interested to hear about it.We don`t have poppy day here,but we have Legacy in September,and the sale of badges and stuff,helps the children of veterans. They do a good job.

Posted by: angel 7th Nov 2017, 04:35am

taurus , this may be of interest to you
regarding the Poppy .

http://torontosun.com/2014/11/06/seven-facts-about-poppies-including-where-theyre-made/wcm/025375b8-cead-4cdf-999b-8407119a6b65

Posted by: ashfield 7th Nov 2017, 07:48am

Dave, they tend to be sold on shops and supermarkets than on the street corner now. Having said that, we saw sellers outside Morrisons and Tesco at the weekend.

Posted by: taurus 7th Nov 2017, 08:21pm

I googled it ,and what i`d read earlier was that 11% of young people ,and some others refuse to wear the poppy as it glorifies war. i knew it was ringing a bell ,that subject. Sounds to me like the usual rentacrowd who would even protest at the sun rising and setting every day,folk with nothing to do and plenty of time to do it.

Posted by: Dave Grieve 7th Nov 2017, 10:35pm

As luck would have it, I was on a bus today going past George Square and there was a woman on the Square selling them.