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> Ruchill Hospital Bids Close, Site entirely for private housing
GG
post 14th Feb 2007, 10:16am
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Scottish Enterprise (Glasgow) have announced that bids to buy the site of the former Ruchill Hospital have now closed. The agency were quoted as saying that there had been "phenomenal" interest from potential private developers, which had resulted in 12 formal bids.

Ruchill Hospital, which closed in 1999, was designed by the City Engineer A B McDonald and was opened in 1900 as an infectious disease hospital by Princess Christian, a daughter of Queen Victoria. The historic site in the north-west of the city stands on almost 40 acres of land includes 13 listed and one non-listed building. The famous landmark red-brick water tower, which dominates the area, is a grade A listed structure.

The whole site has been valued at £3million to £5m according to SE (Glasgow), but - unusually in a sale's pitch - they were keen to stress total cost of developing the area and property could be up to £80m. The site was put on the market in November 2006 and was promoted throughout the UK to potential private developers.

The redevelopment agency's infrastructure director Colum Halforty said:
QUOTE
"The interest we've had in this site has been phenomenal. There are a number of innovative development solutions on the table at the moment that we will now consider carefully."

The site is likely to see up to 400 homes on the site which would make it among the largest areas urban regeneration projects in the country in recent years.

The whole plan though has come on for fierce opposition from the local community, who were appalled and disgusted that Glasgow City Council decided that the entire complex would be for private development only. Local residents were upset that such a large and important area in the heart of their community would not be home to any social rented accommodation; many believe that the decision will lead to problems of integrating the redeveloped site into the wider community.

North Kelvin councillor Jim Mackechnie said feelings in the area are still running high. He added:
QUOTE
"People in the area are still angry as they were looking for between 10% to 33% social rented housing."

Some pundits have also wondered why a development which - at today's property prices - will generate up to an estimated £100 million in sales has been valued at up to £5 million.

GG.

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matt.63
post 14th Feb 2007, 10:29am
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Read this article did'nt even know it had been closed I could see the hospital from where I lived on Panmure st. , looked at the whole area on Google earth and Possil looks like a wasteland very sad


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Lennox
post 14th Feb 2007, 11:39am
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Very sad , I spent many days visiting my mother in that place, seeing those photo's brings back a flood of memories.
the fact that the whole of the Ruchill area can be seen brings a tear to my eye, I grew up in Ruchill. wub.gif


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Avril
post 14th Feb 2007, 01:02pm
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I was very sad to hear that Ruchill Hospital has gone. My cousin from Kirkintilloch was a nurse there and I thought she still was??? My grandad worked there for years, he died in 1963. The only good thing about the picture is that a can see my grandad's old house....lovely memories!


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Anne1
post 14th Feb 2007, 01:15pm
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What a shame closing that Hospital down, I used to go and see my aunt&Uncle who stayed in the little red brick terrace houses opposite along from the chapel. sad.gif sad.gif


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Avril
post 14th Feb 2007, 01:25pm
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Anne1, I can't remember the little red brick houses. My grandad lived next to the chapel, but that was over 40 years ago.


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Anne1
post 14th Feb 2007, 02:15pm
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huh.gif huh.gif Hi Georgia im going back to the 50,s right up to60, anyway have sent you,pm


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buntyq
post 14th Feb 2007, 05:06pm
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We could see Ruchill Hospital from our kitchen window in Auckland Street. The TB patients would be lying in beds on verandahs. Since Ruchill was a fever hospital is there any environmental factors involved? It saddens me to see how those old districts, including my Possilpark, have been neglected. Would that happen to them if they were in the West End?
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marydee
post 17th Feb 2007, 09:57pm
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Ruchill Hospital was closed down because it was a crumbling Victorian building totally unsuitable for the provision of modern and efficient medical treatment. The heart was ripped out of the area because it was a dump where people who were in need of public housing refused to stay. The vast majority of Glaswegians are no different from the ex-pats in leafy suburbs elsewhere in that they too want to 'get on' and own their own home. That's why they are pulling down the old schemes and replacing them with modern private developments and as someone who looks at Glasgow from the reality of living here I say it's not before time.
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Lennox
post 17th Feb 2007, 11:31pm
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QUOTE (marydee @ 17th Feb 2007, 04:14 PM) *
The vast majority of Glaswegians are no different from the ex-pats in leafy suburbs elsewhere in that they too want to 'get on' and own their own home. That's why they are pulling down the old schemes and replacing them with modern private developments and as someone who looks at Glasgow from the reality of living here I say it's not before time.


I don't think any of the Ex-pats would want to hinder anyone from getting ahead and owning their own home. I don't, these old building /hospitials have memories for a lot of us I for one spent a lot of time in Ruchill hospital( see my above post) and as I am from the Ruchill area my memories are special. I am wondering are they going to rip up the park , and all the land the is next to the hospital as well all for affordable housing?
The other thing here is how can it be affordable, when a small house in Glasgow, now starts at over 90, thousand pounds.?


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marydee
post 18th Feb 2007, 01:19am
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The average young couple in Glasgow does not consider renting social housing and even on the minimum wage they can usually afford to buy even if they start out with a small flat. When parts of Bilsland Drive were demolished and lovely houses put up that were priced from £70,000 to £110,000 the development was sold out within a few months of being completed because priority to purchase was given to people who lived in social housing or were on a waiting list for it. Those people who had the right to buy their council house took it up in their thousands and even those on benefits were able to get help through interest only mortgages. While there are pockets of Glasgow where severe deprivation exists it has never been easier to be in full time employment and to get on. I appreciate that folk have special memories of 'old Glasgow' but I'm afraid they tend to be the same people who couldn't get out of it quick enough. I love and live in what I believe to be a modern, progressive and wealthy city where houses on the riverbank cost half a million and it is ordinary boys like my son, who was born and raised on the Maryhill Road, who aspire to buy them. I hope the policy of demolishing all the schemes, that were not built to ideals and standards of what council housing was meant to be like Knightswood and Mosspark, continues because despite being populated by decent people in the early days most had the slum designed into them.

This post has been edited by marydee: 18th Feb 2007, 01:21am
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Java
post 18th Feb 2007, 07:36am
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In my humble opinion, having exclusively private housing areas and exclusively social housing area is a major factor what causes the troubled 'schemes' we have today. Whilst people may aspire to buying, the fact is that not everyone can afford it and these are the ones who will end up in the 'dumping' grounds through lack of social housing in decent areas. I cant see the harm in mixing them.


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GG
post 18th Feb 2007, 09:47am
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Found a comment from a concerned citizen, who voiced his opinion on the matter in a way I think represents the local community:

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Glasgow City Council and Scottish Enterprise seem to be unaware that their purpose as publicly funded bodies is to democratically represent communities.

The selling off of the Ruchill hospital site to property developers in the face of opposition from locals who would prefer to see social rented housing, shows that there is no democracy in Glasgow and that citizens can be ignored.

No one is fooled by the marketing spin and rhetoric quoted in the article.

A spokesman says that the development will "drive the renaissance of north Glasgow", and provides "a rare opportunity to revitalise a strategically important area which has witnessed significant levels of private housing in recent years".

If I were to express faithfully the contempt such talk generates in the communities under attack, there would be no chance of this letter being printed.

Norman Armstrong, November 16th 2006.


...and the local councillor on the same subject, at the same time...

North Kelvin councillor Jim McKechnie said there remained "fully understandable discontent" among the local community, on the issue of the lack of inclusion of social rented accommodation in one of the biggest areas for urban redevelopment in Scotland in recent years, adding:

QUOTE
"It remains a sore point with the local community. They, myself and other local elected representatives and local clergy were united in the view there should be a measure of public housing on this site.

There is a tremendous demand for social rented housing in Ruchill but the council has failed to take account of the figures and the overcrowding problem in the area."


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GG
post 18th Feb 2007, 10:25am
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...and the full sales brief:

QUOTE
GLASGOW

Glasgow is Scotland’s largest City with a population of 630,000, and 1.5m people in the metropolitan travel-to-work area.

The City’s economy has enjoyed a decade of consistent growth, and Glasgow’s jobs base has risen at nearly twice the rate for Scotland and Britain as a whole (source: Glasgow Economic Review, June 2006).Total employment in Glasgow in 2004 was estimated at 400,000, and in the 3 years to May 2005, the number employed in managerial, technical, administrative and skilled jobs rose by 19,000. Major employers include BT Scotland, Scottish Power, the National Australia Bank and the BBC, while Glasgow’s International Financial Services District has attracted JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, Direct Line, and the Ace Group. Dell and O2 have recently established international call centres in Glasgow, and the City has also attracted a number of Scottish Executive relocations from Edinburgh, including the Scottish Transport Agency and the National Health Service.

This employment growth has supported a strong residential market, but over 70% of Glasgow’s new private housing comprises flats, with limited provision of detached, semidetached or terraced houses. Much of the demand for such housing is currently being met by developments outwith the City – the 2001 Census also revealed that 158,000 people living outside the City travelled into Glasgow to work.

DESCRIPTION

The subjects comprise the site of the former Ruchill Hospital, completed in 1900 and closed in 1998.The majority of the hospital buildings have been demolished, but a number remain, including Grade B and C Listed structures, and the Grade A Listed Water Tower which dominates the area and is a landmark visible from many parts of the City. The Water Tower is situated in the centre of the site, and is bounded on 3 sides by former Administration Buildings and Ward Pavilions (B and C Listed).

To the west is the former Nurses’ Home (B Listed), and in the north east corner of the site is the former Stable Block (B Listed).The building to the south of the Stable Block is the Laundry, which is not listed. The site slopes to the north and the south, and benefits from areas of woodland and shrubbery, particularly on the western boundary with Ruchill Park.

The site extends to 38.56 acres (15.61 hectares) approx, and is currently accessed from Bilsland Drive. A new vehicle access is envisaged in the north west corner of the site, opposite the Bilsland Drive/Colgrain Street junction.

OPPORTUNITY

Ruchill Hospital is one of the largest brownfield development sites to become available in Scotland in recent years. It offers developers an opportunity to participate in the regeneration of a site which will contribute to the renaissance of North Glasgow by providing a range of private housing, including apartments in refurbished Listed Buildings, to terracced, semi-detached and town houses.

The site enjoys unrestricted views to the south over the City, and to the Campsie Hills to the north. It includes extensive areas of established trees and shrubs which – together with large areas of open greenspace – will provide the site with a level of amenity rarely available to urban development opportunities.

The site can accommodate up to 300 units – less than 8 per acre, and including 66 apartments in existing buildings.

LOCATION

The site lies approximately 2 miles north of Glasgow City centre, between the A81 Maryhill Road and the A879 Balmore Road. It is bounded to the north by Bilsland Drive (an extension of Queen Margaret Drive), and to the south by Panmure Street. The surrounding area is predominantly residential, but the site is bounded to the west by the 60 acre Ruchill Park, where a new 540 pupil Primary School campus is planned on a site adjacent to the subjects. The area has seen significant levels of private housing development in recent years.These include detached and semi-detached houses to the north of Bilsland Drive, and a number of apartment developments in the Firhill area to the south, where more are planned as part of British Waterways’ regeneration of the nearby Forth and Clyde Canal. planning

BRIEF

A Planning Brief has been prepared in consultation with officers of Glasgow City Council, Development and Regeneration Services, who have confirmed that it complies with the policies of the City Plan and the Local Development Strategy. It suggests a development of 300 private houses, and initial research envisages the following mix:

> 91 semi-detached houses > 100 townhouses
> 43 terraced houses
> 66 apartments in refurbished buildings


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Java
post 18th Feb 2007, 10:44am
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Does this mean that there is no requirement in the policies of the City Plan and the Local Development Strategy for inclusion of social housing?


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