Glasgow Guide Home

Whats On Glasgow Guide
  Glasgow What's On


    Glasgow Reviews


    Glasgow Gallery


      Glasgow Links
Discuss | Guestbook | Postcard | News | Weather | Feedback | Search | About | What's New
Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )                >> View Today's Topics <<

8 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> The Beautiful Game, Made In Scotland
weementor
post 4th Aug 2003, 07:29am
Post #1


Super Resident
****
Posts: 179
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: Neilston Village, Scotland
Member No.: 41
FOOTBALL: MADE IN SCOTLAND FOR THE WHOLE WORLD

England claims it gave the world The Beautiful Game. However, England is wrong. Their brand of football was kick and rush as opposed to pass and move - and it was a foreign legion of Scots who taught the world to play

According to research by football historians, there would be no modern game without the contribution of a bold generation of Scots.

Scottish colonialists, sailors, merchants and teachers were responsible for introducing The Beautiful Game to every corner of the Earth.

And although the Scottish game has lost its way, the football that is now played in Brazil, Argentina and Germany has its roots in a classic pass-and-move football style that was `Made In Scotland'.

Richard McBrearty, a historian at the Scottish Football Museum in Hampden, has been researching Scotland's world roots for the museum's Scots Away exhibit.

And he dismisses claims by our neighbours south of the border that it was they who gave the game to the world.

Richard says: "It's claimed that football was invented in England, but we now know that is not the case and the modern game definitely came from north of the border.

"There is historical evidence of the game being played up here as far back as 1424, but it probably goes back even further.

"The birth of the modern game was the Scotland-England match in Glasgow in 1872 - up until then, the English had played a hybrid game of rugby and football as we know it.

"There was no goalkeeper, no set number of players for each side, there was limited use of hands and no forward passing.

"It was only the Scottish game which developed these rules which have become part of the modern game, and it was the Scottish pass and run game which spread throughout the world.

"The English style was very individual, with lots of dribbling with the ball, but teams like Queen's Park used the pass much more widely. And it was that style which was widely copied because it was more attractive and successful."

The English game only changed in the late 1800s, when major teams down south started to pack their squads with Scots.

These original Anglo-Scots players were quickly lauded and nicknamed `The Scotch Professors', the first Liverpool side of 1892 were nicknamed The Macs, with 11 Scots in the line-up, while the Preston North End `Invincibles' side of 1889 included eight Scots.

And Jock Hamilton, one of the biggest Scots stars of the English game at the time, went on to help create the greatest footballing legacy in the world - in Brazil.

Strange as it may seem, there may never have been a Pele, a Zico or a Ronaldo if it hadn't been for three Scots.

Football was started there in 1894 by Charles Miller, who was born in Brazil to a Scottish father, and who helped found the Paulista League in 1901.

However, Miller preferred the English-style kick, rush and dribble football - it was the arrival of two Scots-born men that created Brazilian football as we know it.

When Paisley textile firm J & P Coats opened a thread mill in Sao Paulo in 1907, workers formed The Scottish Wanderers, who were one of most successful and popular teams in the league's early days.

Their star player was winger Archie McLean, who went on to play for the Sao Paulo state team, and was nicknamed `O Veadinho', meaning `the little deer'.

HIS fast and tricky ball control became the template for the Brazilian style, but it was Jock Hamilton who really impressed the Samba stars, as the first professional football coach in the country, in 1907.

Hamilton, from Ayr, was part of the Scottish exiles who ran Fulham in the early 1900s as coach and star player, and was poached by Brazilian side Paulistano to help promote and shape the game in the Amazon. He is still remembered as founding what is incorrectly known as the Systema Ingleza (English System) they still use, because the locals didn't know the difference between Scotland and England.

It was also a Scot who is credited with the birth of football in Brazil's greatest rivals - Argentina.

Glasgow-born Alexander Watson Hutton was a teacher at the St Andrew's School in Buenos Aires in the 1890s and started an Association Football side in 1882, earning the honorary title of `Father of Argentinian Football'.

The Scottish influence even extended to Argentina's 1986 World Cup-winning side. It included Jose Brown, a direct descendant of 1825 Scots emigrant James Brown and his all-conquering Brown dynasty, who made up much of the Argentina team in the early 1900s.

While Scotland have never been past the first round of the World Cup, the first team to ever win the trophy, Uruguay, owe some of the credit to the teachings of a Scottish railroad engineer.

Glasgow-born John Harley worked in the capital city of Montevideo and played for local side Penarol before becoming a coach.

He adopted the classic Scottish pass-and-move style, and his precise tactics won him the nickname "the Technician", as well as revolutionising the national game and ultimately leading to their 1930 World Cup triumph.

Canada's first club, Carlton FC of Toronto, was founded by a group of Scots in 1876 and was even affiliated to the SFA, while Scots were even more instrumental in the early football successes of the USA.

Dozens of Scottish league players - among the best in the world at the time - were invited to help form the US league in the 1920s, with the result that the SFA tried to ban the recruiting process, described as `The American Menace'.

Saturday's Record told the story of the Scots captain and coaches involved in the historic 1950 World Cup win over England, but 20 years earlier, five Scottish players starred for the USA in the tournament, alongside Scots coach Bob Millar.

Andy Auld, Jimmy Gallagher, Bart McGhee, Jim Brown and Sandy Wood were part of the USA team which made it to the 1930 semi-finals after either emigrating with their families or having been poached by the American league from Scots teams.

Scottish influence even spread as far as China - Glaswegian John Prentice's team, Shanghai Marine Engineers Institute FC, were affiliated to the SFA in 1888.

Back in Europe, ex-Celtic player Johnny Madden coached in Czechoslovakia in 1905, George Smith MacGregor helped inspire an early version of the German Bundesliga, and English coach Jimmy Hogan took Jock Hamilton's pass- and-move tactics to Austria and Hungary.

Historian Richard adds: "The tragedy is that after spreading passing football to every corner of the world, we lost our way.

"We taught the world to play the game, and then forgot how to do it ourselves."

Brian Mciver...for the Daily Record(4/8/2003)


--------------------
weementor......Neilston Village, Scotland
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bartom
post 4th Aug 2003, 03:42pm
Post #2

Settling In
**
Posts: 15
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: Upwey, Vic, Australia
Member No.: 55
wee mentor thank you very much for that I always felt that our tanner ba' players were far superior to those south of the border unfortunately we seem to have lost that skill, when I was home about 3 years ago I noticed that most of the places where we used to play fitba had signs up forbidding playing on them also kids can't play in the streets anymore because of cars I think that has a lot to do with the loss of skills, whereas in Africa, asia and sth america there are a lot of very poor people who do what we did as kids, make balls out of old newspapers or use tennis balls and that gives them the grounding in the control of the ball rolleyes.gif regards Tommy
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
oor mery
post 12th Aug 2003, 12:06pm
Post #3


Unpacking
*
Posts: 9
Joined: 29th Jul 2003
From: Melbourne, Aus
Member No.: 132
weementor,
Thanks for that! It's great to get on here and find such interesting information smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
thebardau
post 13th Aug 2003, 05:35am
Post #4


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 755
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
Member No.: 20
This made excellent reading, wee mentor, & so I'm glad I actually poked my head into the Sports & Leisure forum. I didn't realise that Scotland has "lost the way" & i'll have to find out what this means. Reading bartom's post, it's hard for me to imagine a Scotland where wee boys aren't practising their skill on every available bit of ground.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jimmyd
post 13th Aug 2003, 07:46am
Post #5


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,586
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
From: Sth Coast NSW Aust.
Member No.: 22
Whit wis it Jackie Gleeson used to say.'' Oh how sweet it is "!!. Nice to know Wee Mentor ,thanks for that.I agree with Bartom ,it is a shame the kids can't get to develop their natural ability,also there are too many high tech things around now .Lets face it when we were wee boys,whit else could ye dae.Playing in the streets was it.


--------------------
" If during a lifetime ,you bring happiness and pleasure to just one person ,then your time on earth has been worthwhile indeed ! " Jimmyd
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
thebardau
post 13th Aug 2003, 07:54am
Post #6


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 755
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
Member No.: 20
And in the back courts too, didn't matter where you were, at home or visiting someone - you looked out the window anywhere, & there were always wee boys [& some not so wee], heidin' ba's of all kinds, up against the wall. Hour upon hour, some of them. Tennis balls, whatever. No wonder they were so good. I just assumed that this was still happening, silly me. The only sport I ever watch [sometimes] on the telly is soccer - am I allowed to call it that here?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jimmyd
post 14th Aug 2003, 12:36am
Post #7


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,586
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
From: Sth Coast NSW Aust.
Member No.: 22
Aye Bard,ye can call it that,cause it is too confusing with all these codes,Rugby Union,rugby leaugue,Aussie rules,all under the banner of football.I am hoping to be
on Satellite soon,so will be immersed in the ."Beautiful Game" cannae wait.


--------------------
" If during a lifetime ,you bring happiness and pleasure to just one person ,then your time on earth has been worthwhile indeed ! " Jimmyd
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
thebardau
post 15th Aug 2003, 11:34am
Post #8


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 755
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
Member No.: 20
So will someone please be kind enough to explain what "Scotland losing the way" means - I'm serious.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jimmyd
post 15th Aug 2003, 02:05pm
Post #9


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,586
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
From: Sth Coast NSW Aust.
Member No.: 22
Bear with me now Bard,I have had a few o the grape.Any body that wants to correct me here ,please feel free to do so.
As you have read in previous posts Bard,Scottish players were sought after by the English teams,mainly for their skills and never say die qualities.That spirit that imbues the Scottish character. We always qualified for World Cup and European Championship finals. mind you never progressed very far.Nowadays ,with the influx of foriegn players,the young talent is not being recognised by the Scottish clubs.This has resulted in a dirth of quality players being available to play for Scotland. result is that we can't field a team of home grown talent ,able to compete on the world stage.Mind you Italy are sufferintg the same problem,as are Spain and other European nations.
So what you are hearing is, that for a nation,that has given the world the game as we know it, we have lost our way in terms of producing the fine natural talent, able to compete with the best in the world.
Mind you ,you and I now live in Australia,which is producing world class players ,so augers well for Aussie ,but not for dear old Scotland.. Did ah dae awright,WeeMentor ,Bartom ,Hubert ,Linzeh, an w aw the rest o you Haggis Bashers. PS ah'm no used to being this serious for so long .. unsure.gif unsure.gif


--------------------
" If during a lifetime ,you bring happiness and pleasure to just one person ,then your time on earth has been worthwhile indeed ! " Jimmyd
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
thebardau
post 15th Aug 2003, 02:38pm
Post #10


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 755
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
Member No.: 20
That was expressed very lucidly, jimmy. [Cheers! & here's tae the guardian geese - mine's a Ballantine's the noo.] So does this mean that the hierarchy or powers-that-be in the various clubs, are spending big bucks on transfer fees for star foreign players - & not fostering young Scottish talent? Sorry I'm so ignorant about this, but I find the sports columns boring [apologies all!] & prefer instead to watch a decent game on the telly. Yet this assumption I'm making here surely can't be right - cos surely if it were, then Scotland would still be a presence in the World Cup?
[haggis-bashers - priceless!]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jimmyd
post 15th Aug 2003, 03:18pm
Post #11


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,586
Joined: 27th Jul 2003
From: Sth Coast NSW Aust.
Member No.: 22
You have got it in wan Bard, too many foriegn players an no enough .,weans fae the back courts . sad.gif


--------------------
" If during a lifetime ,you bring happiness and pleasure to just one person ,then your time on earth has been worthwhile indeed ! " Jimmyd
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jock
post 22nd Aug 2003, 02:25pm
Post #12


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,369
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: Los Angeles, California
Member No.: 32
Maybe what we need is a return of the tenements so that the weans will have back courts and closes to play in. I still remember playing heid the (tennis) ba' in the close. You could even play when it rained!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hubert
post 31st Aug 2003, 01:14am
Post #13


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,445
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: las vegas nv usa
Member No.: 31
Unfortunately Scottish football is at a very low ebb, our national team will be playing a couple of games in a week or two, sure hope they do well!
Watched Celtic and Livingston Saturday 5-1 Celtic, my wife came home from work later, and I said Livinston were terrible, and she said arent they the bottom of the league, well I didnt say what I wanted to say, for I thought it best to be polite, and with all due respect to the other Scottish teams, I said, there really are only two teams in Scotland and all the rest ARE the bottom of the league!
Didny work, she right away said you know what I mean, smart ass? LMAO rolleyes.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Catherine
post 31st Aug 2003, 01:19am
Post #14


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 11,490
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: Toronto,Canada
Member No.: 57
Yo ya auld grump tongue.gif
Kin ah jist say.....anither ten odd years an they'll be beggin ma boys tae play fur Scotland..Ye heard it here furst laugh.gif
Surely tae God Martin's awa tae bed noo an ah kin blether!!


--------------------
Oh ahv jist fun anither button...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hubert
post 31st Aug 2003, 01:46am
Post #15


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,445
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: las vegas nv usa
Member No.: 31
Yes they would be eligible for Scotland, but Canada has a team too?
Theres a good midfielder that was born in Canada, plays in the Bundus league in Germany, and is in the England national team, canny mind his name, so go and get me is name, that wull gie ye somethin tae dae?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

8 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 26th Feb 2018

All material in the site Glasgow Guide is copyright of the Glasgow Guide Organisation. This material is for your own private use only, and no part of the site may be reproduced, amended, modified, copied, or transmitted to third parties, by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. All rights reserved.

Glasgow Hotels: book cheap hotels in Glasgow online now.