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> Old School: St Mungo's Academy, I attended in the 1960's
Rating 5 V
*John Hannah*
post 16th Feb 2016, 12:03am
Post #391






I attended "The Mungo"from 1968-1973.I have enjoyed reading everybodys' comments. I did the "Full Monty", St Kents, Kennedy St, Barony St, Parson St and 6th year.
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Stu2012
post 25th Feb 2016, 12:48am
Post #392

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Glad to see this is still ongoing

I'd lost contact and have just rediscovered the link!!

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mcfergus
post 25th Feb 2016, 03:25pm
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Hi to Old Biker, John Hannah and welcome back to Stu 2012.
Old Biker the only posts I have come across from your timeline are those from Terry Burke who hasn't posted for at least a year. Reason unknown.
Stu 2012 you appear to have been in the same timeline as "the Glasgow Boys" so it would be of interest to have your accounts of the lives and times.
Keep posting
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mcfergus
post 18th Apr 2016, 07:58pm
Post #394

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Hi again Old Biker
I noticed this post of yours on another thread and took the liberty of copying to this one in the hope that it might stir some others into posting
"Old biker
Joined: 19th Jan 2016
Member No.: 32,497

I am delighted to read of all the experiences at The Mungo. What has surprised me most is that the appalling cruelty that I and my fellow pupils underwent in the late forties ( I was at St Kentigern's from 1946 to 49) carried on to the end of the sixties - A whole generation later.

The teachers were barbaric though we never discussed the matter thinking that all teachers in all schools were alike though my protestant mate at junior secondary seemed to talk of his teachers in a different. Coming from a lovely wee school in Knightswood the shock was nuclear.

The dismal surroundings of a 40ft wall separating the pupils from the polution of the biggest smoke emitting goods station in Glasgow, the smell of cider from the huge bond house on the west side, the women's prison on the North and the molendinar burn and the Gt Eastern model lodging house to the east must have made it the most undesirable school in Glasgow.

Most of us had to go to school dinners as we were all so far travelled, the Mungo being the only higher education school for Catholic boys. At pimmary the food was brilliant at the Kent it was appalling - and cold. Classic in those years was two tiny scoops of potatoes that would the size of an infants cone one slice of spam or whale meat two slices of beerroot followee by lumpy semolina ( semolina from the molendinar). But there was one great escape - the tattie howkin.

Three weeks on October on a farm in Perth. Living in the local school and marvellous food made by German prisoners of war. Great guys And and that's from someone who was bombed out in the Cliydebank blitz

When my class teacher Obergefteiter Finnegan told me in front of the class that my father was not going to allow me to stay on past fifteen, he said this to be hurtful.

In todays parlance I could have leapt in the air and shouted Ya dancer but of course I did not I left to become an electrical engineer having gained nothing from three years at St Kent's other than meeting a lot of fine guys, and it is for this reason I write, in the hope that there is the odd old FP from that age, who might post something.

My advice is make it sharp the glass is running out.

Phil Wilson 1C1 2C2"

(Original post under Schools-Any Real Old Former Pupils Of St Kent's, Last of the many-20/1/16)
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BigArturo4
post 8th Jun 2016, 10:18pm
Post #395

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McFergus on the current state of devastation of Townhead, there is a great Stephen Mulrine poem
"Nostalgie" about the area being flattened, the Monkland Canal (Kinawl) drained, all to make way for the
coming of the M8 motorway. Enjoy :

Well, the George Squerr stchumers’ve pit the hems
oan Toonheid’s answer tae London’s Thames;
thuv peyed a squad ooty Springburn broo
tae kinfront the Kinawl wi its Waterloo,
an dampt up Monklan’s purlin stream
fur some dampt bailie’s petrol dream,
some Tory nutter wi caurs oan the brain -
it shows ye, canny leave nuthin alane,
the scunners.

Aye, thuv waistit Toonheid’s claim tae fame,
an minny’s the terrs Ah hud as a wean,
fishin fur roach aff the slevvery wa
an pullin in luckies, mibbe a baw,
ur a bike, even, howked up ooty the glaur -
bit thuv timmed oot the watter, fur chuckies an taur,
jis cowped the Kinawl fulla slag, ten a penny,
an wheecht aw the luckies away tae the Clenny,
in hunners.

An thuv plankt the deid dugs aw swelt wi disease,
an pickt oot thur graves wi wee wizzent trees
tae relieve the monotony, eight tae a mile -
brek wan stick aff, thull gie ye the jile.
Ach, thurs nuthin tae beat a gude pie in the sky,
bit Ah’ve seen the Kinawl easy-oasyin by,
an it isnae the same Toonheid noo at aw,
an therrs even the rats is shootin the craw -
nae wunners.

Fur thuv drapped an Emm Wan oan the aul Toonheid,
an thurs nae merr dugs gonny float by deid -
jis caurs, jis breezin alang in the breeze,
terrin the leafs aff the hauf-bilet trees,
hell-bent fur the East (aye, yir no faur wrang),
wi thur taur and thur chuckies tae see them alang -
ach, nivver mind, son, they kin aw go tae hell,
an we’ll jis stick like the Monklan itsel -
non-runners.
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bgorman
post 11th Aug 2016, 01:27pm
Post #396

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Hello Finnieston
I wonder if you know my father -Bill Gorman ? Lynda

QUOTE (*Finnieston* @ 15th Dec 2014, 10:31am) *
I was at The Mungo from 1951 to 1959. The long duration was because my birthday was December and at that time we had a six month 'Waiting Period' in St Mary's Calton before transferring to the main school. I went to Duke Street first and then Parson Street.

I have been overjoyed to come across this site. I have been in touch with a few classmates over the years, but nobody has seen fit to mention this chat.
After The Mungo I went to The Yoonie, a year in Arts then Medicine. I have been a General Surgeon for my working life.

My outstanding memory of school, as it seems to be for many others, was the psychotic Joe Barry. I accept that it was a feature of the era but I can't understand Brother Clare, the headmaster, being comfortable with that chap. It culminated for me when I had to get an application form signed to apply to sit the Bursary. Unfortunately Bro. Clare was off and I had to confront the lion in his den. He said he felt I was wasting his time as I had no chance of being successful. In the event I was, with another fellow from the year Tommy McNamara, in getting a Bursary which was a lifesaver for me as it turned out.

Of teachers:- Bro Luperque. Un Salvador. Can't begin to list what he did for us in the Spanish group. Unfortunately I did not know he had been admitted to GRI in the late 60's with malignant hypertension. I would dearly have loved to have kept close to him, but was not to be.

Freddie Fatori (French/Spanish). An outstanding teacher. Probably learnt most from him regarding structured learning.

Bro Gerard- should never have been in the job.

Hugh O'Neil, contributed to my success by dragging me through Higher Maths. A fabulous guy.

I could go on ad nauseam, but won't.

I have been captivated by Terry Burke's notes of several years ago.

Just occurred to me to mention Daddy Collins, that nobody has reported. He was a History teacher and his main interest was ANYTHING that the Irish did. If you didn't know the answer to an Irish question, he lifted the desk lid, put your head under it and articulated the answer as he banged you head against the hinged lid.

I have to catch up with years of this site's postings and that suits me fine.

Thanks.

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StephenMac
post 13th Aug 2016, 10:25pm
Post #397

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I attended St Mungo's from 1969 to 1975 - first 2 years at Duke Street - then 2 at Parsons Street/Barony Street - final 2 at Hanson Street. Got very fond memories of most of the time I spent there - met some great people. Anyone out there a contemporary?
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mcfergus
post 31st Oct 2016, 09:49pm
Post #398

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Is there anybody there???
Just in case and first of all "welcome" to StephenMac.
You,re a wee bit after my time but it would be interesting to read some of your stories/recollections to make comparison with times past, Names of some of the teachers and comment on idiosyncracies and good points etc.What about your contemporaries. Perhaps their names might make an impression and elicit further contributions.
Secondly "thanks" to BigArturo4.
The poem on the "Kinaul" says it all. I think quite a few of the"stchumers" are still in residence in George Square.
I wonder if "Let Glasgow Flourish" has any resonance with "Nil Sine Labore"
A recent press snippet mentioned a salmon seen in the Clyde near the Boomielaw thanks to clean water policies. Is there a possibility some time in the future of a wee man sitting by the Molendinar with a fishing rod catching a fish with a ring in its mouth----.Better stop there before I go too far with the fantasy
I,ll be happy with some new postings.
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StephenMac
post 1st Nov 2016, 01:41pm
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Cheers mcfergus, thanks for the welcome - was beginning to think no one was ever going to post on here again lol

So - some of the teachers I knew which may spark off some thoughts.....

Richard Binns (English) - what a guy - before his time (and he was actually English too) - so mickey was taken to quite a degree, bless him.

Frank Pignatelli (French) - great guy and role model.

Willie McLaughlin (English) - sadly no longer with us.

Ian Gilroy (English) - lovely man - gay and tortured - was sad to read on here that he died very young, after a struggle with alcohol RIP

Shuggie Donnelly (Latin) - good sense of humour

Some fellow pupils:

Gerry Strong, Gerry McKenna (bumped into him at a Celtic match recently!) David Lindsay, Dermot Walsh, Jim Whannel, John Viola, Des Cornes, Tommy Docherty, Kevin Sweeney, Brendan Cosgrove.

I was at Glasgow University between 75 & 78, so a few of the above were friends then. From 78 until now, I have lived my life in England with work (aside from 82/83 and 89-95) Therefore have lost touch with them all (although still visit Scotland to see family (every 2 months) or watch Celtic (ST holder)

I am currently retired (at 59) and living in Washington, Tyne & Wear.

Would be good to hear from anyone who knows me or anyone listed above
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*Billy Boil*
post 3rd Nov 2016, 08:38pm
Post #400






QUOTE (mcfergus @ 31st Oct 2016, 09:49pm) *
Is there anybody there???
Just in case and first of all "welcome" to StephenMac.
You,re a wee bit after my time but it would be interesting to read some of your stories/recollections to make comparison with times past, Names of some of the teachers and comment on idiosyncracies and good points etc.What about your contemporaries. Perhaps their names might make an impression and elicit further contributions.
Secondly "thanks" to BigArturo4.
The poem on the "Kinaul" says it all. I think quite a few of the"stchumers" are still in residence in George Square.
I wonder if "Let Glasgow Flourish" has any resonance with "Nil Sine Labore"
A recent press snippet mentioned a salmon seen in the Clyde near the Boomielaw thanks to clean water policies. Is there a possibility some time in the future of a wee man sitting by the Molendinar with a fishing rod catching a fish with a ring in its mouth----.Better stop there before I go too far with the fantasy
I,ll be happy with some new postings.

Sounds a bit fishy to me ; salmon in the Broomielaw. (I remember when falling in the upper Clyde required extensive hospitalization and stomach pumping). However last month 2 humpback whales took a detour into the river mouth leading to the North Creek. This being a minutes drive from my front door. I suppose anything is possible.
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mcfergus
post 4th Jan 2017, 04:13pm
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Happy New Year Everybody!!

It seems like no time at all since this time last year but with not too much happening in the interval if the comparative dearth of contributions is anything to go by. I hope that things pick up this year so I'll keep looking in.
See you later
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gismho
post 4th Feb 2017, 12:18pm
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Thanks Mcfergus. May I also wish everyone, belatedly, a successful 2017.
I'll just add (for posterity) that my cousins, David and Laurence Lockhart, also attended the school, the former from 1948 to 1951 (I think), St. Kents; and the latter from 1956 to 1960 (I think), Rigby and Parson Streets. Someone out there may recognise these names !!
Would I be correct in saying that the youngest person having a St. Mungo's (Parson Street) pedigree would now be about 56 years of age? This would be based on fact that the school was closed circa 1973 (I think). Any comments ??
This may account for the levelling off of comments.
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Jerry McBride
post 6th Feb 2017, 12:48pm
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QUOTE (Michael Docherty @ 23rd Jun 2008, 08:37pm) *
Hey, pk - I remember that bakery - it became our steady lunchtime eatery after a brief altercation with the guy who ran Papa's and we decided to never darken his doorstep again. The Math teacher you refer to - 'Mac' - was probably McAloon - I remember him well - A short, chubby little guy with glasses... I managed to get through my First Year at St. Kent's ( relatively ) in one piece although I had hated every single minute of it and still wished I had gone with my first instinct - to go to St. Thomas Aquinas along with all my Primary School pals from St. Peter's in Partick. After that first horrible year in St. Kent's I foolishly assumed the baptism of fire was over and done with and it would get better from there on in... What's the old adage about '..famous last words..? '... Summer was great with a two-week school-organized vacation to Italy & Switzerland and one of the teachers who accompanied the group was McAloon himself who seemed just fine as a civilian but as a teacher was a Jekyll / Hyde character. That idyllic summer was winding down - Back to St. Kent's for a Second Year full of optimism - I considered myself fortunate to find Eddie Onion would play no part in my next 12 months of incarceration - he was too busy commuting between St. Kent's and Kennedy St. where he continued to torture 12 & 13 year-olds with his Spanish Inquisition teaching tactics, taking centerstage as The Grand Inquisitor himself. Brother Alexis had been spirited away to be replaced with a crusty old Irish guy as Headmaster - A 'Fire and Brimstone' type. No more Latin which meant no more McConville or Mr. Shields ( - "Sammy Mensa" to us -)... One of our English teachers was a young woman - a Miss Hawthorne who was immediately re-named ' Miss Hot-Horns ' due to her extremely impressive physical attributes. She was barely 5 feet tall which created a bizarre symmetry considering she was also about 5 feet in diameter. The most obvious thing about her was the massive chip she carried around on her shoulder which manifested itself in her liberal use of the belt, each period consisting of about 25% education and 75% 'Discipline'. Being somewhat vertically challenged she actually had to stand on a stool to dish out punishment to the taller guys in the class. As far as I can recall she was the only female teacher in a school full of boys which in itself was probably intimidating, made worse by the fact that no-one took her seriously. She lasted 4 or 5 months and left as an emotional trainwreck. Teaching Art was, as you mentioned - Mr Byrne - He was one of the best teachers that place ever had... I remember seeing him running around on a little Honda motorbike and how he spent several months on crutches with a broken leg thanks to a genius car driver performing the ubiquitous right-turn sans signal stunt. Big Sam once again took care of French, History was taught by a lanky American teacher from ( I think ) Ohio. I remember the first day he strolled into the room wearing cords, cowboy boots and a leather vest and sporting a drooping gunfighter's mustache as if he'd just walked off the set of a Western flick, the only thing missing was the Colt Peacemaker strapped to his thigh... Science was delivered courtesy of a new teacher - A Mr. Boyle who was another great believer in battering a good education into his class. He surprised us all with an unscheduled Test about 4 weeks into the new school term and anyone who scored below what he considered 'acceptable' had the stuffing belted outta them - about 95% of the class. Within a week I had a run-in with McAloon the math teacher. He took offense at the way I was sitting (?) - slouched insolently in my chair and not bolt-upright and hanging on his every word. I recall he derived great enjoyment from trying to make people look silly in front of their peers and when he was done berating me for my lazy posture I returned to my seat and after a brief moment of sitting erect with hands clasped in front of me I resumed my insolent slouch. I believe this may have triggered The McAloon Meltdown... Before I knew it I was in front of him and, for a little guy moved deceptively fast - a blur, in fact as he dealt out a rapid 6 hefty strokes of the belt and as I headed back to my seat, genuinely stunned the little bastard grabbed me by the back of my collar and physically threw me through the door (- fortunately for me the doors swung both ways-) and sent me sprawling into the hallway beyond, head spinning. When I gathered my wits and went back inside against his stern warning to 'Stay Out' of his classroom I scooped my books into my briefcase and exited the building, totally ignoring his demands to 'Explain Myself'... Being ignored by a pupil was obviously new ground for him and it was making him uneasy. I eyed the huge welt on my wrist left by the mis-strokes of his belt and the discoloration of the broken veins under the skin but realized my own folly in deciding to go home early - we were scheduled to have a double period of swimming that afternoon and nothing short of a dismemberment would prevent me from being there. Besides - the wounded wrist would look much worse later. I made good my escape after swimming and headed home to show my mother the results of McAloon's handiwork which by now was an amazing assortment of deep reds and purples. She went predictably ballistic and when my father came home he responded in similar fashion, dragging me down to the local copshop to press charges against this loose-cannon maniac of a teacher. The police did indeed pay him a visit and from what I heard later scared the Bejazus out of him with the threat of potential criminal charges for his deeds. Imagine my delight when I was informed the decision lay with me - prosecute or not prosecute. I told the Powers-that-be I would ".. let him off this time ..". He was in my pocket now and he knew it and I made damn sure everyone else in the class knew it too. I was invisible to him for the rest of that term - he received a serious bollockin' from Bro. Lucas ( the latest headmaster ) and was getting looked at sideways by his teacher colleagues which led to him being little more than a joke but the incident had soured me and just contributed to the overall realization that for me school was a place where I would make chalkmarks on the wall like a lifer in San Quentin, counting down those long days to my 15th birthday and my escape.

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Jerry McBride
post 6th Feb 2017, 12:54pm
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Hello there Michael, I'm Jerry McBride I was at St Kentigerns from 1964-1966. I remember hearing of the McAloon incident. To this day I have often wondered if he got clean away with it. I am so glad you have given me some closure.

Good luck
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mcfergus
post 7th Feb 2017, 10:22pm
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Hi again gismho.
Good to see you are still looking in. I would tend to agree with your thoughts on the youngest age range of possible contributors from the "old" Mungo. We have had only a few remarks from former pupils of the new east end Academy. Still there appear to be a few older than me on this thread giving us a possible range from ages 56 to 75+, so there might be some life left in it yet. Hope everthing is still good for you in sunny S.A.

Welcome to this site Jerry McBride.
I have read various contributions from some of your contemporaries. perhaps you are still catching up with them. It will be of interest to get your take on some of them.
I will keep looking in
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