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> The Walls Came Tumbling Down, The Clydebank Blitz -
boots
post 30th Oct 2005, 11:06am
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The tenements on Crown Avenue where our family lived were still standing after the first night of the blitz. After the all clear sounded, dazed residents listened as loudspeakers, mounted on vehicles patroling the streets, urged everyone to move out as far as they could through the fields beyond the town. Mrs M. with the help of her lodger, Mr B., gathered her brood of four daughters and did just that. After some distance they began to flag. Mr. B., a man of generous proportions, was running short of breath, Mrs. M.'s bunions were throbbing and wee Mary was whining. Short rest breaks had become more frequent and the group was exhausted, there had been no sleeping the night before, now they gave in and slept, the walk would continue later. They wakened to the wail of the air raid siren, all four children began to scream. Footsteps were heard approaching then a friendly voice called out "Follow me, there's shelter over here".

The shelter was a narrow passage way in a church. It was crammed with people sitting four abreast and back to back. Space was made for them to sit and they joined the group. Planes droned overhead as someone led the group in singing trying to drown out the sounds of the falling bombs, as the sounds grew louder, the dim lights flickered then went out. The singers sang louder. The building shook and plaster fell while sounds of breaking glass told of broken windows. The children cried themselves to sleep. Morning came, the All Clear sounded and it was over. Mrs. M. lived across the street from our family, my mother and her were close friends. Blitz stories were exchanged when we found one another again.
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davyab44
post 7th Nov 2005, 03:51pm
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Hi Boots...Y' know people talk about the Blitz but it must have pretty scary, not knowing if you were going to come through it or not....I was a babe in in arms at that time, so I don't have a personal recollection of it

I do however remember my Mum taking me to Clydebank for some reason that escapes me.......the evidence of the Blitz was certainly there.


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Here's tae us, wha's like us? Damn few an' they're a' deid
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Mulberry
post 6th Apr 2006, 05:01pm
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I was told that my grandmother who lived in Kilmun St Maryhill died after the ceiling came down on her when bombs fell there.Was this a case of stray bombs? My family history is a bit on the vague on this matter. How much of a bombing did Glasgow get.
Mulberry
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RonD
post 14th Apr 2006, 01:32pm
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My older brothers and sisters lived through the war. They lived in a tenement in the country (from a defunct mine) very near the the Forth and clyde canal. Also nearby was supposedly an ammunition dump. So it was thought prudent that the tenants dddgo to air raid shelters when there was blitz. This combined with the fact that the bombers followed the canal to tranverse Scotland to get to Glasgow more specifically the shipyards on the Clyde.
My mother had a miscarriage during this time to which she attributed the nightly runs to the shelter.
One evening she got tall the family settled, (my father was probably working night shift at the mine) when she realized that the she had forgotten one of my sister. Although my sister calmly slept through the wole incident.
My Mother used to stay up to 1 a.m. and if she didn't get the siren by then she knew it was ok to go to bed.


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aaron king
post 14th Apr 2006, 07:27pm
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QUOTE (Mulberry @ 6th Apr 2006, 06:18 PM)
I was told that my grandmother who lived in Kilmun St Maryhill died after the ceiling came down on her when bombs fell there.Was this a case of stray bombs? My family history is a bit on the vague on this matter. How much of a bombing did Glasgow get.
Mulberry

i remember my late mother telling me she lost 8 of her close friends in the bombing in kilmun st,she moved away a few years before ,i have heard the germans thought it was part of clydebank,,there was a few hundred died in the clydebank blitz
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Archie Millar
post 15th Apr 2006, 01:55pm
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I remember the night that Govan was bombed. I lived in Cowglen Rd-Househillwood, and I can remember the sound of the German bombers coming across. My sister and I stood at the bathroom windows and looked at the searchlights and the Barrage Balloons,--in the morning,(where the Pollok Centre is now,) we went into the field and picked up the aluminium strips that the planes dropped to confuse the Radar
Norah,my wife, was in Portman St,Kinning Park and, the next street to her,---Blackburn St was hit. I believe they never did hit Govan ship-yards


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Sadly Archie passed away in March 2007:

http://discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=8646

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George Muir
post 15th Apr 2006, 02:37pm
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Archie, I remember the night that Blackburn St. was hit, we lived at 36 Paisley Rd. West, roughly across from Portman St. and our tenement building was structurally damaged by the effects of the blast and they pulled it down in 1944. You probably remember the gap in the tenement block where our close was. By the way, Norah will remember that Portman St. was the best street around for roller-skating. You will recall too the bombing in Nelson St. where there were lots of casualties from the destroyed tram and the building nearby.
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dugald_old
post 15th Apr 2006, 05:39pm
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Archie, Harland and Wolff's engine shop (?) right beside the vehicle-ferry, was hit by a bomb right on the corner beside the ferry. This was a red brick building. Now I'm not quite sure if it was on March 13/14 air-raids or at some other time. I doubt if this 'hit' held up the building of ships, but it did some extensive damage to the building. This is the only time i think that a Govan ship-yard was hit.
Cheers, dugald.
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Elma
post 16th Apr 2006, 01:18am
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I remember the blitz both in March and again in May of that year. We lived in Scotstoun just up from the yards on the Clyde. My dad was outside firewatching and saw a parachute bomb coming down over our houses, we were in the cupboard under the stairs, said to be the safest part of the house. As he watched, the bomb fell on the houses on Queen Victoria Drive across the field from our house. We lived in a terrace house and all the houses on our road lost their windows at the front and even some at the back were blown in with the blast. We had that kind of netting glued to the windows so that they wouldn't shatter. I stayed after the first blitz but after the May one, I was bundled off back to Annan to stay with my grandparents for the rest of the war.
In Annan we used to hear the german planes going over, they had a different sound from the British ones and we would wait for the all-clear to let us know they were away back to Germany again. We would then wait to hear from my parents to know if they had survived the bombing and what had been hit that night.
I was still too young to realize the enormity of the situation although at school we talked about the war in our lessons each day.
I also remember the huge convoys that drove through Annan which was on the main A97 going south. Sometimes they would take 2 or 3 hours to pass and if you got caught on the wrong side of the High Street you were there for all of that time. These were all the parts of "Mulberry" the floating dock that was part of the D-Day invasion.
My grandsons are always fascinated by the stories that I can tell about the war.
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Murdo
post 23rd Mar 2007, 11:03am
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QUOTE (aaron king @ 14th Apr 2006, 07:44 PM) *
i remember my late mother telling me she lost 8 of her close friends in the bombing in kilmun st,she moved away a few years before ,i have heard the germans thought it was part of clydebank,,there was a few hundred died in the clydebank blitz

QUOTE (Mulberry @ 6th Apr 2006, 05:18 PM) *
I was told that my grandmother who lived in Kilmun St Maryhill died after the ceiling came down on her when bombs fell there.Was this a case of stray bombs? My family history is a bit on the vague on this matter. How much of a bombing did Glasgow get.
Mulberry

I beleieve that they were aerial mines that came down by parachute. Not sure why they were dropped there. These were devastating weapons designed to destroy structures. May have been trying for McLellan's factory. Does anyone know?


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Gallusbisom
post 23rd Mar 2007, 10:05pm
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My Great Aunt Helen (Nellie), was in Clydebank the night of the blitz and aftewards she walked in her nighty, no shoes, nothing but her two young kids from Clydebank to McLellan St. ( near the Kinning Park subway station), to relatives. Talk about guts, that generation had it and more.
GB
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wee mags
post 23rd Mar 2007, 11:51pm
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If I can remember right there was stories of parts of Kelvindale being bombedI dont know where it was


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fae Maryhill noo the USA
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Anne1
post 24th Mar 2007, 04:24am
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I was about2-3yrs of age when bombs dropping being in ma grannys lobby and thats when Kilmun St was bombed ma granny stayed in Cumlodden drive which ran right across past the school almost to top of KilmunSt they say it was railways lines shining that made them think it was River Clyde but they were also after the gas works at bottom of The ButneyI kow i was very young but that memory stays with me


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ANNWAN
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Isobel
post 24th Mar 2007, 01:27pm
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My Uncle Jimmy was a butcher in Clydebank. I always remember him talking about the blitz and how many customers of his that died ,whole families wiped out. I remember he took my cousin my sister and myself to where his old shop was.The buildings were standing but it was like half a building .You could see everyones places all the different wallpapers etc, it was like rows and rows of little boxes all different inside. Very sad ,although I was very young at the time and it was after the war I remember it very well. I think he took us so that we would get a feel of what it was like to have lived through something like that.We would never have know otherwise.


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From Glasgow now in Canada
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lindamac
post 26th Mar 2007, 02:32am
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what an intriguing topic & to hear it from true survivors is so excellent.My mother often spoke of the wartime Glasgow & how they all huddled together at the back close furr safety which she felt wasnt so safe at all.Mum lived in St vincent street However because my gran had to work in the munitions factorys mum ended up getting evacuated,I must ask her where to? as she barely talks of it all now but did when we were awe weans ye know.


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