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> Common Irish Surnames In Scotland, Irish surnames commonly found in Scotland
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valros
post 20th Sep 2006, 03:32pm
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Thanks again Paul for very interesting reading

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Paul Kelly
post 23rd Sep 2006, 10:49am
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Yesterday I mentioned under the 'Family Research' topic that the small mining village of Croy in the Kilsyth area used to be known as a 'Little Ireland' due to the origins of most of its inhabitants. The mining theme also reminded me of the Blantyre Explosion or Blantyre Disaster, the worst ever mine disaster in Scottish history.

In October 1877, 207 men and boys - 11 were actually under the age of 14 - lost their lives in an explosion at Pit No.2 in the Dixon mine at High Blantyre. Of the 233 men and boys who had gone to work that October morning at Pit No.2, only 26 survived the explosion, most of them very badly injured. Incredibly, in 1879, there was another explosion at Pit No.1 in High Blantyre, in which a further 28 men and boys died. Around half of the workforce at the High Blantyre pits were Irish and this is reflected in the surnames of many of the deceased in the 2 explosions.

The following 60 Irish surnames appeared amongst the dead at Blantyre:- Berry, Boyle, Brannigan, Brannan, Bryson (Breslin), Brown (Browne), Burns (Byrne), Cairns (Kearns), Carlin, Cox, Coyle, Cosgrove (Cosgrave), Conaghan, Crowe, Conlan, Campbell (Irish), Connelly, Dolan, Divers, Duffy, Gilmour (Irish), Gribben, Hanlon, Kavanagh (Cavanagh), Kelly, Kenny, Lynch, Lafferty, Larkin, Martin, Mullan, Murray (Irish), Moore, Murphy, Malone, Meechan, McCue (McHugh), McGowan, McFadden, McGarry, McGarvey, McLaughlin, McKelvie, McCusker, McCulloch, McGhee, McMullen, McAnulty, McGuigan, O'Brien, O'Donnell, O'Neil, Owens, Roper, Smith (Smyth), Tonner, Traynor, Vallelly, Welsh (Walsh) and Ward.
Many of these surnames appeared more than once as fathers, sons and brothers died together. For example, there were 4 Kellys who died in the large explosion of 1877.

The 19th century Irish labourers who constructed the canals, tunnels, bridges and railway lines, and who worked in the factories and mines throughout Scotland (and England) were very brave and hard working and some paid the ultimate penalty for their courage. The Irish navvies provided the sweat and muscle without which much of Scotland, as we know it, would never have been built.


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RonD
post 23rd Sep 2006, 12:07pm
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We have to acknowledge the migrant agricultural labourers ( listed ag lab on reports) who came each from Ireland to bring in the harvest. There was an unfortunate incident where a number of Irish migrants were working on a farm in the Kirkintilloch area about 1931. At night the farmer used to lock them in a byre since he didn't trust hem to be wandering around at night. The horrific outcome was that a fire started in the byre and they couldn't get out and I believe all lost their lives.


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Paul Kelly
post 25th Sep 2006, 07:01am
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Hi rdem.

I have just been reading about the 1937 Kirkintilloch barn fire on the net. The 10 young Irishmen - aged between 16 and 24 - who died in the fire all came from Achill Island in County Mayo. It was a horrific incident.

Paul.


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Paul Kelly
post 25th Sep 2006, 09:03am
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I recently received an email about the Donegal surname Carr. The email informed me that most of the 19th century Irish Carr immigrants to Scotland had their surnames recorded incorrectly as Kerr, which of course is a Scottish surname.

As a result, a significant minority of the Kerrs in Scotland today are actually of Catholic Irish descent, particularly in the Glasgow and North Lanarkshire areas. The same thing can be said of several other Scottish surnames such as Burns, Duff, McCulloch, McCormick and others. (See my introduction to this topic.)

This post has been edited by Paul Kelly: 26th Sep 2006, 05:51am


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Paul Kelly
post 25th Sep 2006, 01:41pm
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The other day when I was discussing the Dougherty/Dogherty/Docherty surname, I meant to add that the usual spelling of this surname today in its country of origin - Ireland - is just simply Doherty.

This post has been edited by Paul Kelly: 26th Sep 2006, 05:55am


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Riddrieperson
post 25th Sep 2006, 08:26pm
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QUOTE (Paul Kelly @ 19th Sep 2006, 09:37 AM)
District 14 was enclosed on the north by the Trongate, on the south by Clyde Street, on the west by Stockwell Street and on the east by the Saltmarket. It was basically the inner city area between Glasgow Cross and the River Clyde and contained places such as the Briggait - Bridgegate - and Paddy's Market.



I read a book last year which mentioned district 14 and I posted an enquiry on the Glasgow Boards about it,but no one seemed to have heard of it.This is the first time I have seen anybody else mention it.It is ironic that the area to the north of district 14 was the most affluent area,Merchant City,where many of the tobacco barons had their residences.


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Paul Kelly
post 26th Sep 2006, 05:47am
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Campbell, Murray, Morrison and Patton/Patten are Scottish surnames and there are people in Ulster today with these surnames who are descendants of 17th century Scottish Protestant Planters.

However, there were native Catholic Irish families in west Ulster - Donegal, Derry and Tyrone - who adopted these 4 surnames as the Anglicized versions of their Gaelic surnames shortly after the Plantation. Today, there are famous Catholic Irish families in Donegal and Tyrone with these surnames. In addition, some of the Catholic Campbells in Donegal are descendants of 14th century Scottish Gallowglasses. Campbell is a very common surname in County Donegal.
(See my discussion of Gallowglass families under the topic 'Are the Scots Really Irish?' in this 'Family History' forum.)

As a result, a significant minority of the Campbells, Murrays, Morrisons and Pattons in Scotland today are descendants of 19th century Catholic Irish immigrants from west Ulster, particularly in the Glasgow area.

This post has been edited by Paul Kelly: 26th Sep 2006, 10:17am


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Paul Kelly
post 26th Sep 2006, 07:59am
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Hi Kenny.

It is certainly true that the Merchant City and Blythswood areas were the most affluent parts of inner city Glasgow in the early to mid 19th century. There were very few Irish people staying in these areas, if any at all! Moreover, as inner city Glasgow became more and more 'swamped' by Irish immigrants, many of Glasgow's wealthier inhabitants relocated to the West End and South Side.

Paul.


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Paul Kelly
post 29th Sep 2006, 09:44am
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Another Scottish Plantation surname that was adopted by some of the native Catholic Irish families of West Ulster was Huston/Houston, particularly in County Donegal.


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Paul Kelly
post 30th Sep 2006, 11:32am
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3 other British Planter surnames that were adopted by some of the native Catholic Irish families of Ulster were Hughes, Woods and Rogers/Rodgers. For example, Rogers was often adopted as the Anglicised version of the Ulster Gaelic surname MacRory.

Most people in the Glasgow area today with these 3 surnames - Hughes, Rodgers and Woods - are descendants of 19th century Irish immigrants.

This post has been edited by Paul Kelly: 30th Sep 2006, 02:02pm


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gardenqueen
post 30th Sep 2006, 01:44pm
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I was born with an Irish (NI I think) name. Dad came from Belfast to Glasgow in the early forties.

My first married name was of German origin I think (possibly Swiss German) but now I am back with an Irish surname in my second marriage, it is a variant of de Burgh I believe.

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Heather
post 2nd Oct 2006, 09:42pm
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GQ, the second wife of Robert the Bruce was Elizabeth de Burgh. Her father was the Earl of Ulster. Your husband should check out his ancestors. wink.gif


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Paul Kelly
post 3rd Oct 2006, 12:55pm
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Another Scottish Planter surname that was adopted by some of the native Irish of West Ulster was Gillespie, particularly in County Donegal.


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Paul Kelly
post 3rd Oct 2006, 01:02pm
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Many Irish Gaelic surnames were Anglicised in the years following the Plantations. In some cases the Anglicised versions were completely different from the original Gaelic forms. For example, the County Donegal surname of Crampsey (O'Craimhsighe) meaning 'bone' was usually Anglicised to Bonar or Bonner. The County Armagh surname of MacGirr (MacAnGhearr) meaning 'short' was usually Anglicised to Short or Shortt. The surnames of Crampsey and McGirr can still be found, though Bonar and Short are much more common.

This post has been edited by Paul Kelly: 4th Oct 2006, 05:34am


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