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> Northpark Street Tenament
red
post 17th Nov 2007, 02:48pm
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I was born at 80 Northpark street,Maryhill in 1962,would anyone happen to know if that building still exists?
Thanks
Red.
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celtic-chic67
post 18th Nov 2007, 08:53pm
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I looked up northpark street in the virtual mitchell web site and there is
a photo of it during demolition in 1976.
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andypisces
post 18th Nov 2007, 11:50pm
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Hi Red i dont think 80 still exists. All the top end was demolished. My granma lived at no 74 and had cousins in the last close on that side before firehill rd. I stayed in springbank st.....Andt
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red
post 19th Nov 2007, 05:49pm
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Thanks Celtchic and Andy Pisces.
I don`t actually remember living in Maryhill because we left there when I was still very young,to go and live in Drumchapel,which I do remember.
I was just a bit curious about what the house on Northpark street looked like,but I`m assuming that if it was demolished in the mid 70s it was probably already dilapidated by the early 60s.
Thanks again for your help.
Cheers,
Red.
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celtic-chic67
post 19th Nov 2007, 06:53pm
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Hi Red,where about's in drumchapel did you stay?
the reason I'm asking is I also stayed in drumchapel
for about 20 years or more.
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ejlch
post 19th Nov 2007, 09:11pm
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Red I grew up in 105 Northpark Street until we were deported, sorry I mean re-housed, by the local authority to Easterhouse.

The photograph of the demolition on the Mitchell Archives gives a good impression of the style of building it was. Your 'close' was opposite ours, although of course I don't remember particular details of it. Your side of the street was a bit posher than ours because yours were 'bought hooses' i.e. the flats were owner-occupied. Before the 1950s almost everyone in the street would have been tenants of private landlords. But after then, the private landlords wanted out and they sold the flats as fast as they could (same story all over Glasgow).

A mixture of owner occupation and rented apartments owned by less affluent landlords was a bad mix and the already ageing properties fell into steady decline.

The closes on your side had, like ours, a complete mix of social classes. The ground floor was often for the poorest folk. I remember on your side, maybe even at number 80, we had good friends - a family called Florence. I can remember even as a wee boy thinking it was bad that their home had a hard (concrete) floor and the common ground floor closeway outside their door always seemed damp and even wet all the time.

However, the upper mid-level flats, would often be inhabited by lower middle class folk. Another feature is that if your people lived on the ground floor it is most likely that they shared a single wc closet located in the common closeway and shared with the other families on that floor. Most people in the street were similarly placed, but up towards the top end on the side of the street with number 80 quite a few of the upper level flats had the luxury of their own 'inside' the flat toilet. Mind you that would still only be a closet and not a bathroom en suite!

House heating for everyone was by open hearth coal fire. Central heating was unheard of in ordninary peoples' flats. Reasonably well-off working people burned coal. posh ones burned 'nuggets' (selected small, regular, coals) and poor folk made do with 'briquetes' made out of dust and small pieces made wet and presed into shapes. Your family would have leaned out the tenement window and shouted to passing coal lorries to buy coal. The huge bags of coal were brought up to the flat and dumped in bunkers... inside the flat! An occasional excitment was a 'lum fire' when the soot inside of someone's chimney caught alight. That would result in the Fire Brigade calling and much scrambling about, and the neighbours gossiping about 'people who don't get their chimney swept enough'

The fact that the flats were demolished by the mid 1970s tells you that they were in a bad way by then.

The local neighbourhood was a good one to grow up in even if it was not affluent. As a boy I had a choice of at least two cinemas to go to for the Saturday matinee; the Blysthwood and the Seamore. Many people say they recall dropping into Jaconelli's cafe on Maryhill Road to get an ice cream - but I have to say that for our family and all the ones we knew, that was a luxury way beyond the pockets of us kids.

We had the joy of two fish and chip shops within 5 minutes walk, Wiltons (I think it was called) on Maryhill Road was the posh one. Mum had a great local shopping centre around Maryhill Road. Your family females (the males did no shopping!) would have did a great big once a week shopping usually on a Saturday. They would then still have the Dad's Friday night pay to spend - I can well remember being bored out my skull having to que with my Mum in the Cooperative on Queens Cross.

For the adults a lot of entertianment was of the home variety. It was common to visit another family for Sunday lunch. In the evenings familys and friends might gather for a game of cards when sometimes they would even dare to play for half penny banks. Larger occassions (or for some rougher families, any occassion!) families and friends would meet together in someone's house and bring their own carry-oot (a bag of alcoholic drinks bought from the local off-licence). The drink had to shared all around and much singing of a highloy variable quality was enjoyed and endured. The system was meant to be strictly managed. Each member of the company present was in turn required to sing (in extreme you might get off with a monologue if you were know as a teller). If someone was singing you were under no circumstances to apeak or join in unless instructed to... the ruling expression was 'wan singer wan song'!

As I write this it strikes me that I do not have a single m emory of any electronic music being played at any of these gahtering with one exception.This was the last Hogmanay we lived there and one of my uncles suggested having the radio on to hear in 'the Bells' with Big Ben chimes and then a bit a traditional music before wthe adults returned to the real thing.

Another unique local amentiy was Firhill stadium, home of the football team Partick Thistle. At that time Partick Thistle was still 'a contender' and could on their day square up to eihter of the-now giants Celtic or Rangers. Another feature of community in those days was that the manager of Partick Thistle, Bertie Auld, a good friend of my Dad's also lived in the neighbourhood - that would be unheard of nowadays.

One of my memories was of consumer luxuries just arriving in the street. My family was the first up our (quite well-off) close to have a TV (an Ultra). Some of the older biddies in our close did not think wel of my Mum when she had the audacity to persuade my Dad to buy a washing machine! Mind you most of the older wimmen were a nasty lot and very unco-operative with the young mums who desperatly needed a bigger share of the rota for drying clothes out in the back court (back green, that actually was covered in concrete)

All in all, I would guess that your family were happy in the community they lived. But they would also be becoming more aware that the physical copnditions and environment were just not acceptable for a modern age. There was also regular periods of high unemployment and ongoing low wages with the decline of the Scottish heavy industry, although not as severe as in pre-WW2 times. They therefore would probably have felt impelled to 'move on' and better themselves. This was the best thing to do for many families at that time - and I do wish that many people who talk of the good old Glasgow communities would do a bit of real remembering about the real life conditions that tens of thousands of families escaped from.

I mtrust and hope thta your family did well. For mine I have to say that the move to Easterhouse was a long term disaster. I don't think any of my family were ever happy with that outcome. To this day if I go by Northpark Street, I have strong emotional twing of nostalgia for a really happy young life started there.
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red
post 21st Nov 2007, 08:12pm
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Hi Ejlch,
Well.thanks for all that information,you`ve managed to paint a very vivid picture of what I suppose is now a long gone community.
I know there were a lot of families who were-like you,really unhappy about the mass "deportation" to all these huge sprawling council estates in the 50s&60s,but at least no one can ever erase the great memories you have,can they?!!
I love nostalgia,I think it`s great to look back.I`ve started doing my family history,so I really am looking back,as far as I`m able to see!!!
I was really surprised when I read all that you`d taken the time to write,I couldn`t have hoped for more detail,and from someone who actually lived there around that time-there`s nothing like an eyewitness account,is there?? biggrin.gif .
I had no real idea at all what my birthplace would have been like,especially at that particular time,so it has meant a lot to me.I have really appreciated what you`ve done.
Cheers, biggrin.gif
Red.
PS.
Sorry for taking so long in getting back to you,I just read your post today.
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red
post 21st Nov 2007, 09:00pm
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Hi Celtchic,
I lived on Kinfauns Drive,across from the school-St Pius,I think it was called.
I went to Summerhill School,and my friend at the time was a Margaret Shepherd,who also lived on Kinfauns a couple of closes down.My Uncle Charlie [Johnston],his wife Sadie and my cousins lived near Waverly School,but I don`t know when they left
We lived there from maybe around 1964/65,and I have some happy childhood memories from that time.
My family left Drumchapel in 1971 when I was nine and moved to England,in the Greater Manchester Area.
I have been back to "the Drum"[as my mum and dad would call it]a couple of times,the most recent being about three years ago,just on a little nostalgia trip to show my partner.It was quite sad really,in fact if I`m honest I was really gutted,because my old school and even the community centre,where my brother,myself and all our friends used to have so much fun,had both been burnt to the ground.To add insult to injury,even my Grandads`house[we lived at my grandas hoose!!] had been knocked to the ground as well!!!
I know it might sound silly but,even though it was all so long ago,I came away feeling as if someone had just jumped all over the little memories I had carried around with me all those years,-sad I know,but never mind,I`m over it now!!
I`m not bitter,but they even let the shopping centre my mum used,to do her shopping,just fall to bits mad.gif
Well,never mind-I`ve got my memories of a lovely community[as I remember it]and can still see the faces of people,some of them probably long gone who made that time what it was for me. biggrin.gif
Cheers,
Red.
PS.
Sorry for taking so long in getting back to you,but I`ve just read you post today.
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celtic-chic67
post 21st Nov 2007, 10:50pm
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Hi Red,
I moved to the drum when I was about 6 years old,I went to st.sixtus primary & then onto st.pius secondary.Istayed above the shops in summerhill road for about 9 or 10 years.
My uncle & my cousin both went to waverly and they also stayed above the shops with my nana & granda walker.
In fact the last time I was in drumchapel was about 2 years ago for my nana's funeral,it was so
sad that the family had to give the house up.
when I got married I moved back up tae the drum ,again summerhill road across the road fae waverly school,stayed there for about 10 years then we got told the houses were coming down,
I then moved tae cloan avenue.
while I was up the drum on my last visit I noticed that my old house had been pulled down and
that is where the new summerhill primary school now stands.
where waverly school was in now bellway homes.
Like yourself Red,I had a great childhood in drumchapel,and I will always keep my memories
as they can take the houses down,but our memories go with us. wink.gif
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red
post 22nd Nov 2007, 06:20pm
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Hi Celtchic,
It`s funny to think that there must be many people,probably even scattered world wide,who have so many happy memories of a lil ole housing estate just tucked away somewhere in the south west of Scotland!! But any Glaswegian I`ve ever known[I lived in Blackpool for a few years,so I`ve bumped into more than a few,over the years!!] has always seemed to have a poor opinion of Drumchapel. How come it has had such a terrible reputation?
This is not the place I remember at all.I know that most housing estates,wherever they are have deteriorated over the years but is the reputation the Drum has,really deserved?
I hope not.That would really be a shame. sad.gif
Thanks,
Red. biggrin.gif
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stuarty
post 22nd Nov 2007, 06:49pm
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my lovley uncle andy spent his last days in northpark nursing home and my aunty is still in maryhill road wub.gif and a lot of the old buildings have been sandblasted and refurbished but a dont know about northpark st sorry happy hunting wub.gif


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celtic-chic67
post 22nd Nov 2007, 06:52pm
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Hi Red, I don't know why the drum got a bad reputation,as far as I'm concerned the people there were very friendly and everyone knew everyone.
I think a lot of housing schemes got bad reputations because they are classed as poverty stricken areas,with a high rate of unemployment.
In all the years that I lived there I never seen any violence,and the kids all got on well and played together.
there used to be about 20 or more of us that all played rounders,kick the can,ten man hunt,even chap the door run away.oh,happy days. laugh.gif
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flam
post 18th Mar 2008, 07:35pm
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Hi All. In Northpark St one side of the street backed on to the Forth and Clyde Canal,and the top of the closes on that side had carved in to the stonework, Birds Coo-ing,nesting,Rearing Chicks,then the last close would have the two birds alone again (I swear it} as I used to pass them almost every night to my house which was 117 Kirkland St { I always regret never having taken a photo of each close ,Bertie Auld stayed in Panmure St near to the Ruchill Park Gates,his mother had a wee shop in Firhill St near to Leny St,and her daughter had a mobile grocer shop which she took around Possilpark,but unfortunately she passed away very young I believe her name was Annette Cheers Flim
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wee mags
post 18th Mar 2008, 10:38pm
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flam my pal sAunty used to live in Panmure St ,and Bertie Auld used to come over ,my pals aunt had a son who was a slow learner, and Bertie and his pals were very good to him ,I am sorry I cannot ask my pal her aunts name as my pal died last year.I used to have a photo of Bert on a bike with one of his cronies And I cannot find it now .


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frankd2
post 26th May 2008, 05:28pm
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My cousin lived at 102 Northpark Street in the 1940's and when my parents took me visiting his family my cousin and I would watch "The Thistle" playing football.
From their bedroom window we were able to see half of the pitch!
"Oh! happy days"! biggrin.gif
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