Glasgow Guide Home

Whats On Glasgow Guide
  Glasgow What's On


    Glasgow Reviews


    Glasgow Gallery


      Glasgow Links
Discuss | Guestbook | Postcard | News | Weather | Feedback | Search | About | What's New
Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )                >> View Today's Topics <<

7 Pages V  « < 5 6 7  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Scottish Mums Can't Cook, ... so says American talk show host!
**Ben Aligan 3**
post 13th Aug 2010, 09:51pm
Post #91






My auntie used to make fabulous clootie dumplin'. After a visit to her house, we nagged our ma to try her hand at making dumplin'. We stood beside the cooker for what seemed like hours while we waited for the dumplin' to manifest itself. When it was eventually fished out of the pot and unwrapped it had the appearance, weight and texture of one of those small iron canonballs they used to fire in battle....but it didn't go to waste....my brother and his pals took it into the back court and played at footie with it for hours!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Celyn
post 13th Aug 2010, 11:22pm
Post #92

Super Visitor
***
Posts: 78
Joined: 19th Apr 2005
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1,912
Hahaha, mibbe she had invented Dwarf Bread by mistake. biggrin.gif Still, you got a football game out of it. I shouldn't joke - I've only ever bothered doing the cheating version in the microwave oven.

My Dad made a dumpling just a week ago and took it along to my mum in her care home. Not sure it mattered much to my mum (Alzheimer's) but it gave the staff nice fits of nostalgia.

Here. I've just thought - you know how mothers can be clever and sneaky? Maybe your Mum knew fine well how to make the dumpling but just fancied getting you and the other weans out from under her feet for a while. Very crafty! biggrin.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Christine13
post 15th Aug 2010, 03:09pm
Post #93

Unpacking
*
Posts: 7
Joined: 14th Aug 2010
Member No.: 8,843
How they managed to produce a home cooked meal every day when they had no fridges, so shopping was a daily occurence, and they had to trail to the steamie at the same time - light the fire in the monings, no labour saving devices - I was bought pon good wholesome meals, not the supermarket rubbish of today.

I cant make dumpling either - my job was to turn it at the fire to get a 'skin' on it.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gemini
post 16th Aug 2010, 01:17pm
Post #94


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,591
Joined: 30th Jul 2003
From: USA
Member No.: 193
been reading all the posts on the remark Jay Leno made, he is a jerk and doesn"t know what he"s talking about, never really cared for the man and do not watch his show, besides I am never usually awake at the hour he comes on, to this day I still make what I call "mah mammy's" soup, and I also still make mince'toatties' which my kids and now g/kids love.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
proudmaryhiller
post 16th Aug 2010, 06:54pm
Post #95


City Key Holder
******
Posts: 544
Joined: 20th Apr 2010
From: Maryhill, Glasgow :D xx
Member No.: 8,432
QUOTE (Christine13 @ 15th Aug 2010, 05:19pm) *
How they managed to produce a home cooked meal every day when they had no fridges, so shopping was a daily occurence, and they had to trail to the steamie at the same time - light the fire in the monings, no labour saving devices - I was bought pon good wholesome meals, not the supermarket rubbish of today.

I cant make dumpling either - my job was to turn it at the fire to get a 'skin' on it.

Your so right Christine, I remember our milk sitting out in a pan of cold water on the windowsill,we had an old gas cooker with the eye-level grill but my dear mum made good nutritious meals, great clootie dumplings (can still remember that wonderful smell)and lovely homemade rice with raisens/currants. Wouldn't change those days for anything, even a piece and margarine and sugar tasted great lol!


--------------------
"I belong to Glasgow"
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
witshisname
post 18th Aug 2010, 05:46pm
Post #96


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,248
Joined: 25th Mar 2004
From: Montreal
Member No.: 1,055
He's a jerk awright,absolutely nothing wrong with Scottish cuisine..perhaps if he wasn't filling his Gob with Pizza & Pasta he may appreciate the food that his mammy grew up on.
A big thank you fae me to aww you lovely Scottish Mums oot there fer feeding us weans on Mince & Totties,Home made soups and many more great dishes.
NOBODY cooks like you..ye's are the best smile.gif

P.S A dish my mother loved as a child & enjoyed up until her Passing was Boilt Totties wae a raw egg over them,I would say yuuuuuck and she would say you don't know how lucky you are to have what you eat wub.gif


--------------------
If I don't see ye through the week,I'll see ye through the windae
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Celyn
post 19th Aug 2010, 12:21am
Post #97

Super Visitor
***
Posts: 78
Joined: 19th Apr 2005
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1,912
QUOTE (proudmaryhiller @ 16th Aug 2010, 08:04pm) *
Your so right Christine, I remember our milk sitting out in a pan of cold water on the windowsill...


Did it ever fall off? Often people did that when I was a student, because of having no kitchen facilities, given that meals were to be taken in hall, but you'd still want to have the ability to offer friends tea and coffee. So people often put milk on the window sill, and sometimes if it had been windy (as if winter in Scotland would ever be windy smile.gif ) you might be walking down a street and see all these sad wee white puddles and squashed milk cartons. I suppose there must be unlucky people who were once just walking along minding their own business and were suddenly hit by one of these accidental falling milk bombs.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Celyn
post 19th Aug 2010, 12:37am
Post #98

Super Visitor
***
Posts: 78
Joined: 19th Apr 2005
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1,912
I missed the edit window, so just to clarify: I meant the milk falling off the windowsill, rather than than people often fell off the windowsill. ohmy.gif And now I'm off at a tangent remembering Adam McNaughtan's song about chucking pieces out of windows.

QUOTE
Oh ye cannae fling pieces oot a twenty storey flat,
Seven hundred hungry weans will testify to that.
If it's butter, cheese or jeely, if the breid is plain or pan,
The odds against it reaching earth are ninety-nine tae wan.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*Michael Docherty*
post 20th Aug 2010, 09:31am
Post #99






Interesting - I've been watching Jay Leno on a fairly irregular basis ever since he took over from the legendary Johnny Carson back around '92 and was always led to believe his mother was originally from Liverpool !! Anyway -- I wouldn't thrash Leno too badly - if you cast your mind back to the 90s you may remember it was Billy Connolly who once declared that all Scottish cuisine was based upon a dare... From a personal perspective my Ma used to cook up the most delectable Mince 'n' Spuds imaginable - Fantastic. The downside being that you found yourself confronted by it on at least 5 nights out of the week. God forbid you should admit to liking a dish in particular because she would feed it to you until you could no longer tolerate the sight of it. On Fridays we were relegated to (allegedly) ' fish ' for dinner but unfortunately Mater was somewhat unaware of the 'boning' process required to make such a repast edible and after both myself and my father reduced to writhing on the kitchen floor coughing up mouthfuls of fishbones, the usual Friday menu changed to Bacon and eggs with copious amounts of fried bread - a glorious heart-attack on a plate. At some point I discovered the exotic delights of macaroni and cheese - I have no clue where I came upon this wonderful dish but I badgered my mother to delve into the realms of alternative cuisine ( which both she and my father always referred to as disgusting ' Foreign Muck ' ) and, having finally given in to my incessant nagging, we both went in search of a place that sold pasta. This was around 1960 or thereabouts and the only place where we could find the stuff was a pet shop on Dumbarton Road in Partick - just west of Partick Cross and next door to a Bingo Hall whose name escapes me... We would go in there once a week for a half-pound of budgie seed and a half-pound of macaroni and the guy behind the counter would measure out the seed with a big metal scoop and weigh it on the scale then do the exact same thing with the macaroni - amazing... Sunday's feast almost always consisted of an enormous chicken boiled to death in a pot to the point where it was so dry you had to shower the thing with about a pound of salt - otherwise there was no way in Hell you could possibly generate enough slobber to digest the thing. My father used to describe my Ma's culinary expertise by saying she was 'Someone who couldn't boil water without burning it' and he eventually started making a point of being 'Out and About' on Sundays, thus escaping the wrath of the weekly Chicken from Hell. Then she discovered something called ' A Roast ' and everything miraculously changed. I have no clue to the origin of her newly-found expertise but it was like Manna from Heaven and almost overnight Sunday became the day you sat there, slobbering in anticipation of this wonderful new feast and both my father and myself would attack the unsuspecting lump of dead cow ( or pig ) and tear it to pieces, savoring every delectable bite. Her attitude never did change regarding pasta and in my teenage years she would throw a raging fit every time I brought home a curry or Chinese food. While she cursed me for polluting the entire house with the stink of this vile, Foreign stuff my father would scoff and laugh at the fact that only someone of my particular generation of idiots could be conned into believing rice was a legitimate part of the meal - ' No spuds, indeed...' but when all is said and done I still get the occasional hankering for some of my Ma's Mince 'n Tatties... the best...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dizzybint
post 24th Oct 2010, 09:26am
Post #100

Lord Provost
*****
Posts: 303
Joined: 20th Oct 2010
Member No.: 9,116
As much as I was brought up fine my auntie would still make too many greasy things.. lard in the frying pan and I dont mean a wee dollop , this was big piece of lard. same in the chip pan.. to this day I hate grease , my wee mammy was worse, she would fry her food then pour the whole thing over her mound of totties, gave me the boaks.. and everything else was rice made with carnation milk, jelly made with carnation milk, condensed milk on pieces.. it just wasnt food that is good for you... Im not in favour of the processed junk either, as its so harmful. I never cook fatty food, and try not to buy food in pastry of any sort.. uch am a bore... dont listen to me...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
**Marion**
post 4th Nov 2010, 08:45pm
Post #101






My mother was a very good cook..... Even during rationing or maybe because of rationing, she was quite avdenturesome when it came to trying someting different. An example...... as well as the usual mince, she made a mean oxtail stew,tripe and onions,liver and onions and of course her soup was second to none...... She too was an excellent baker (that made me smile when I read other comments). She baked a mean rhubarb pie and I can still imagine her saying ''och I think I'll rattle up some doughnuts'' and she would..... As far as Jay Leno....... I can't say anything nice so I won't say anything.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

7 Pages V  « < 5 6 7
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd Oct 2019

All material in the site Glasgow Guide is copyright of the Glasgow Guide Organisation. This material is for your own private use only, and no part of the site may be reproduced, amended, modified, copied, or transmitted to third parties, by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. All rights reserved.

Glasgow Hotels: book cheap hotels in Glasgow online now.