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> 100th Anniversary Of The First World War, Did you have ancesstors that served?
GG
post 3rd Jul 2016, 11:04pm
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Just like today, the media lied to further the interests of its elite owners.

QUOTE
Whatever the personal depths of shock and grief, society at large seems somehow to have absorbed the blow.

Support for the war was, on the surface at least, almost unaffected. A campaign to cancel the August bank holiday to aid war production received widespread backing.

"By September the dead have become a reason for fighting in themselves," says Prof Connelly. "How can a compromise peace be considered after this?
"You have gone through all of this to give Germany even a smidgeon of what they want? It would be letting the dead down."

"A virtue is made of the situation by the authorities," says Prof Badsey. "Men are sacrificed, never slaughtered. And it is always brave and heroic. Devastated units have covered themselves in honour."

The Somme campaign came to a muddy end in November and the nation was left to count the cost.

More huge battles in 1917 and 1918 - Passchendaele and the 100 Days - caused casualties that approached those of the 1916 battle, but nothing compared with the shock of the first days of the Somme.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-36149839

GG.

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Rab
post 6th Jul 2016, 08:02pm
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I never knew my Grandpa Robert, but I do know he served throughout WW1- not sure about the Somme though, but I know he was at Mons
. He was a keen Territorial and went overseas to France with the first forces. He went over as a Corporal and returned in 1920 as a Company Sergeant-Major. He was given mentioned in dispatches, but I never found out what for.
He was given an award after he rescued four of his men who were in danger of drowning after being swept out to sea.
I am fortunate to have his WW1 war medals and a few photos - here are some of them. His horse, he called 'Bobby' which is what I am still called by the family as I took my Grandpa's first name. I still have his bible that he carried throughout the war.
Rab. Aye - still here!

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My Uncle James went to the front as a Captain in the Irish Guards.
He was a real hero as he won the Military Cross at the 3rd Battle of Ypres. After WW1 he went to live in New York and had a son, my cousin Jim.
When WW2 broke out, Uncle James rejoined the Guards and finished up a Major. Cousin Jim, being a Yank, joined the USAAC and as a Lieutenant flew
Bi7s to bomb Germany. His plane was shot down over Hamburg whilst Jim was dropping bombs there and he had a very bad time as a POW where he lost a hand! Heroes, the lot of them!
Here is Uncle James and cousin Jim.

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My Uncle Bill joined the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada and served in Europe in WW2 - AFTER having served in WW1.
Luckily all these brave members of my family, who did their bit, survived. I am sincerely proud of them all.
Rab.


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GG
post 6th Jul 2016, 10:15pm
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Thanks for posting, Rab. Great photos and memories.

Sad to read about your cousin Jim.

The Germans - for good reason - increasingly hated the crews of the Flying Fortresses that bombed German civilians during the war. The strategic bombing campaign was one of the saddest episodes in British military history: a campaign of mass and prolonged terror against innocent German civilians that prolonged the war by taking vital airborne resources away from the battle fronts and by hardening the resolve of German soldiers to fight to the bitter end against the Allies.

GG.


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Rab
post 9th Jul 2016, 11:18am
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'a campaign of mass and prolonged terror against innocent (German) civilians' Sounds a lot like our Blitz! Clydebank!

Martin. That is one view of one part of a very complex problem that was, one must not forget - started by our enemy. War is hell for everyone. Rab.


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Rab
post 9th Jul 2016, 11:45am
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QUOTE (GG @ 6th Jul 2016, 11:15pm) *
Thanks for posting, Rab. Great photos and memories.

Sad to read about your cousin Jim.

The Germans - for good reason - increasingly hated the crews of the Flying Fortresses that bombed German civilians during the war. The strategic bombing campaign was one of the saddest episodes in British military history: a campaign of mass and prolonged terror against innocent German civilians that prolonged the war by taking vital airborne resources away from the battle fronts and by hardening the resolve of German soldiers to fight to the bitter end against the Allies.

GG.


Martin. I read your post several times and thought how similar it might have been to our civilian population so I hope you will forgive me if I revise it a wee bit?

'The British - for good reason - increasingly hated the crews of the Luftwaffe that bombed British civilians during the war. The strategic bombing campaign was one of the saddest episodes in the history of warfare: a campaign of mass and prolonged terror against innocent British civilians, that included missiles and prolonged the war by taking vital airborne resources away from the battle fronts and by hardening the resolve of British soldiers and civil population to fight to the bitter end against the Nazi's'.


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*Billy Boil*
post 9th Jul 2016, 02:51pm
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QUOTE (GG @ 6th Jul 2016, 10:15pm) *
Thanks for posting, Rab. Great photos and memories.

Sad to read about your cousin Jim.

The Germans - for good reason - increasingly hated the crews of the Flying Fortresses that bombed German civilians during the war. The strategic bombing campaign was one of the saddest episodes in British military history: a campaign of mass and prolonged terror against innocent German civilians that prolonged the war by taking vital airborne resources away from the battle fronts and by hardening the resolve of German soldiers to fight to the bitter end against the Allies.

GG.

Innocent German civilians! Where did that one come from? The strategic bombing started in London in August and September of 1940 and continued for 5 years. Do not recall V1s or V2s being launched from Britain as "Vengeance Weapons" when the war was all but over. Thousands dead and a million homes destroyed in a period of a few months. By German Nazis need to keep murdering. Bear in mind that in the elections held after Hitler seized power, 93% of "innocent" Germans voted for him and his murdering ghouls. And where were the "innocent Germans" who manned the concentration death camps and drove the infrastructure that supported them.

Over one million still in SS uniforms in 1945. Well if they were engaged in the murder of Jews they were exempt from the Russian front. "Innocent Germans" shames the dead of Coventry, London, Clydebank, Manchester and all other U.K. cities bombed every night by innocent Germans.

My mother was in the Royal Artillery and saw here comrades killed by bombs deliberately dropped on search light batteries. The terror bombing, put in to practice in Spain and continued all over Europe from 1939 onwards was a tool developed and sanctioned by, not just Hitler and Goering, but by most "right thinking German civilians".

"We were never Nazis" was an invention of 1946 Germans eager to escape the vengeance of Poles and Russians. Ask them about "Innocent Germans".
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Rab
post 9th Jul 2016, 06:00pm
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My cousin Jim as mentioned above, along with other Allied POWs was treated with extreme brutality. He spent nearly 2 years in Moosburg POW camp, the largest of all. It was built in 1939 to house up to 10,000 POWs but at the wars end it house 70,000 allied POWs in filthy squalor. From there, the prisoners, including Jim,
were force-marched 600 miles across Germany in the worst winter for decades with little food, water or shelter. He wrote of an incident when they were near death with starvation, when the guards stole 5 sheep from a farm and killed them to eat. The 600+ prisoners were given one sheep to share - the other four sheep were given to the 100 odd guards. Jim and his comrades were beaten many times to
keep them marching and some were shot when they could go no further. Most had no shoes or boots and had to walk for hundreds of miles on frozen tracks. The German guards had no sense of humanity or respect for the Geneva Convention on the rights of prisoners. Compare this treatment to the German POWs who came to Britain and were well looked after and found it so good here that many stayed after the war. Two wrongs never made a right, but in my opinion, they deserved all they got. Never forget the way the allies worked to return Germany to civilisation and built it into the modern country which we see today.


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*Billy Boil*
post 10th Jul 2016, 04:07pm
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QUOTE (Rab @ 9th Jul 2016, 06:00pm) *
My cousin Jim as mentioned above, along with other Allied POWs was treated with extreme brutality. He spent nearly 2 years in Moosburg POW camp, the largest of all. It was built in 1939 to house up to 10,000 POWs but at the wars end it house 70,000 allied POWs in filthy squalor. From there, the prisoners, including Jim,
were force-marched 600 miles across Germany in the worst winter for decades with little food, water or shelter. He wrote of an incident when they were near death with starvation, when the guards stole 5 sheep from a farm and killed them to eat. The 600+ prisoners were given one sheep to share - the other four sheep were given to the 100 odd guards. Jim and his comrades were beaten many times to
keep them marching and some were shot when they could go no further. Most had no shoes or boots and had to walk for hundreds of miles on frozen tracks. The German guards had no sense of humanity or respect for the Geneva Convention on the rights of prisoners. Compare this treatment to the German POWs who came to Britain and were well looked after and found it so good here that many stayed after the war. Two wrongs never made a right, but in my opinion, they deserved all they got. Never forget the way the allies worked to return Germany to civilisation and built it into the modern country which we see today.

Alongside the "sanitization" of the Death Camp scrutineers and sundry mass murderers, this incident, which I only read of or heard broadcast recently, was also "sanitized" by the Allies in the interest of our "Friends" the good ex Nazis. Remember 7000 of them went to South America on red cross and Vatican passports. Paying their passage with Jewish gold teeth. There are extensive lists of mass murderers and human experimenters brought to trial after the war.

What is notable is how many of them had their death sentences commuted and were later free to join their comrades in the "New Germany" and those who for mass atrocities were given a severe slap on the wrist.
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wombat
post 14th Jul 2016, 09:48pm
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QUOTE (Billy Boil @ 9th Jul 2016, 03:51pm) *
"We were never Nazis" was an invention of 1946 Germans eager to escape the vengeance of Poles and Russians. Ask them about "Innocent Germans".


rolleyes.gif another racist rant 'GOOD GERMANS' tried to kill hitler as far back

as1921. 35 attempts in total .

http://valkyrie.greyfalcon.us/hitlermurd.htm.


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*Billy Boil*
post 14th Jul 2016, 11:05pm
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QUOTE (wombat @ 14th Jul 2016, 09:48pm) *
rolleyes.gif another racist rant 'GOOD GERMANS' tried to kill hitler as far back

as1921. 35 attempts in total .

http://valkyrie.greyfalcon.us/hitlermurd.htm.

Sieg Heil Kammerade!!!
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