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> 100th Anniversary Of The First World War, Did you have ancesstors that served?
RonD
post 23rd Jul 2014, 11:14am
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The sign up posters used by the government of the day was a child at a Fatherś knee asking: ¨What did you do in the Great War?¨ To get young men to join up for King and Empire. My grandfather was in the Argyll and Sutherland Territorials but only served for 69 days from where he went back to the mines.
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TeeHeeHee
post 24th Jul 2014, 12:13am
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Hi Ron wink.gif
My ol' man was only 10 when that one started but he had lots of older brothers who served and fell. I remember ma da' sayin' 7 went down in the first war and 4 in the second. Taking him, my uncles Hughie and Robson, that made 10 brothers in the family ... so that meant the other 4 siblings were girls. Back then many families were huge:Industry fodder to cannon fodder in one generation sad.gif
There must be many GG members with family stories from that "War to End All Wars (Part I)"
I was once permitted by the owner of a beautiful old house; which he was intentionaly letting run derelict, to remove the great long shelves from the kitchen to use to build a ramp to get my baby boy's pram up to our garden which was accessed by steps.
"Take anything you want", he said.
While ripping out those shelves and thick stuff round the kitchen I found a leather pouch with the Masonic Emblem on it and had a look in. It was full of letters from an upper class family during that war; some of them with black borders (mourning) and; knowing the present owner had nothing to do with that Family, took them home to read with a clear conscience.
There was sadness there and some from the trenches were almost Monty Pythonesque: ...Oh by the way bit of bad luck I'm afraid mother. Old Freddie bought it yesterday.Poor fellow. Auntie Jane will be most upset.Poor dear. ... that kind of thing.
That was one of the items my misses dumpted while we were divorcing. You can imagine how I felt when I realised that!
Remember the John Mills film "Oh What A Wonderful War" ?

I really do hope members who have stories of that wonderful war will take up on your invite and share their ancestral histories with us.
We'd be really grateful. thumbup.gif


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dugald_old
post 25th Jul 2014, 07:15pm
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I read an interesting story in yesterday's BBC News about a letter that had been found lodged between the pleats of a WWI kilt by a professor at a university in Southampton, England. This kilt had apparently been handed down through the family of the finder, but it wasn't until recently that the letter had been found. Seems the letter had been written in Glasgow by some young woman who lived on Ardgowan St. in Kinning Park, probably a seamstress or other involved in the manufacture of the kilt. The letter contained the rather poignant words of a poem. The person who originally owned he kilt had served in the London Scottish Regiment during the Great War. An effort is underway to find information about the author... a difficult task since the Ardgowan St. was torn down to make way for a motorway.
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Dylan
post 25th Jul 2014, 07:49pm
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Am I right in thinking, dugald , that the original wearer would not have been aware of the Poem ?


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dugald_old
post 26th Jul 2014, 12:04am
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Yes Dylan, I don't think the original wearer of the kilt would have been aware of the Poem, but that's only a guess. It could well be that he never actually wore the kilt: like for example, it could have been issued just as the war was ending, but who knows.
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carmella
post 1st Aug 2014, 07:22pm
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It would be so terrific if we could find out more.


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d.c.
post 1st Aug 2014, 07:42pm
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Just in case any of you may not yet have seen this website, which as well as looking to the past, also gives details of some of Glasgow's forthcoming First World War commemorations:

First World War Glasgow

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Dylan
post 1st Aug 2014, 08:23pm
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QUOTE (dugald @ 26th Jul 2014, 01:21am) *
Yes Dylan, I don't think the original wearer of the kilt would have been aware of the Poem, but that's only a guess. It could well be that he never actually wore the kilt: like for example, it could have been issued just as the war was ending, but who knows.


Hi Dugald,I think it is a better story if he never knew as the girl had secreted it. ? smile.gif


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Dylan
post 1st Aug 2014, 08:24pm
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QUOTE (d.c. @ 1st Aug 2014, 08:59pm) *
Just in case any of you may not yet have seen this website, which as well as looking to the past, also gives details of some of Glasgow's forthcoming First World War commemorations:

First World War Glasgow



Excellent site dc.

Thanks for that. !


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booler
post 1st Aug 2014, 10:50pm
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QUOTE (Dylan @ 1st Aug 2014, 09:40pm) *
Hi Dugald,I think it is a better story if he never knew as the girl had secreted it. ? smile.gif

such a nice story but the article I saw the kilt was never worn and the letter was discovered when lt was being unpacked sorry just thought you might like to know
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Dave Grieve
post 2nd Aug 2014, 09:19am
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Rather than start a new thread have posted here, hope nobody objects.
Delville Wood today as it has been allowed to regrow
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Delville Wood after a weeks fighting.
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One of the things that annoy me when reading about WW1 and Two is the overshadowing of the African participation; I know we were probably the smallest in numbers of the Empire but percentage wise a very high proportion took up arms to aid Britain.
Two actions are remembered here in SA, one during the battle of the Somme on 15 July 1916, the S.A. Infantry Brigade was ordered to clear the wood at d'Elville, north-east of the village of Longueal, France, of enemy soldiers, so as to protect the flanks of the British Brigade.
The South Africans occupied the wood without much opposition, but the problem was not so much to take the wood, than to hold it.
Despite fierce counterattacks and artillery bombardments from German divisions, the SA brigade refused to surrender. The brigade was relieved on 20 July after six days and five nights of ferocious fighting. Only 750 soldiers remained of the Brigade's 3 433 soldiers, the rest had either been killed or wounded.
The Battle of Delville Wood went down in the history of WWI as an example of supreme sacrifice and heroism and remained the most costly action the South African Brigade fought on the Western Front.

The second action was not so much a battle but an example of men knowing that they were going to die facing that death with as much bravery as any person awarded the VC


On January 16, 1917 the SS Mendi troopship sailed from Cape Town on its way to France carrying 805 black privates, 5 white officers and 17 non-commissioned officers as well as 33 crew.
On the morning of 21 February 1917, another ship, the SS Darro travelling at full speed and emitting no warning signals, rammed the SS Mendi which sank in 20 minutes. No steps were taken by the SS Darro to lower boats or rescue the survivors.
There are many stories of bravery about the men's bravery as the ship went down. One of them is that of the Reverend Isaac Wauchope Dyobha, who cried words of encouragement to the dying men.
The men sang and stamped the death dance together as the SS Mendi sank, taking with her all still on board and many who leapt into the icy waters (607 black troops along with 9 of their fellow white countrymen and all 33 crewmembers). Joseph Tshite, a schoolmaster from near Pretoria, encouraged those around him with hymns and prayers until he died. A white sergeant was supported by two black compatriots, who swam with him and found place for him on a raft.
146 000 Whites volunteered for service in WW1, while altogether 83 000 Blacks and 2000 Coloureds did service in non-combatant capacity.
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Dylan
post 2nd Aug 2014, 09:33am
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QUOTE (booler @ 2nd Aug 2014, 12:07am) *
such a nice story but the article I saw the kilt was never worn and the letter was discovered when lt was being unpacked sorry just thought you might like to know



Thanks booler, still a nice, poignant story. smile.gif


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RonD
post 2nd Aug 2014, 12:25pm
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Hereś another site that might help find out where your soldier ancestor was laid to rest.
www.cwgc.org The Commonwealth Graves commission


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dugald_old
post 2nd Aug 2014, 02:20pm
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That's all right Booler, the intention of the lassie from Ardgowen's St. renders it still a touching story... she was in the war too. The following shows the facts of the story:

"A hidden poem from a Glasgow woman has been found sewn into the folds of a World War One kilt owned by a Southampton academic. Dr Helen Paul discovered the hand-written message when she was removing the packing stitches from the kilt, which has been passed down her family.
The note is a poem with lines including: "If married never mind, if single drop a line".
It is signed by Helen Govan, of 49 Ardgowan Street in Glasgow.
Continue reading the main story. The full poem reads:
I hope your kilt will fit you well

and in it you will look a swell

If married never mind

if single drop a line

Wish you bags of luck

and a speedy return back to Blighty
Dr Paul said: "It would be fantastic to trace who this lady was and learn more about her history."
The London Scottish Regiment kilt was manufactured by Peter Wilson of Bridge Street in Glasgow.It was destined for a soldier heading to the front during WW1 but for unknown reasons it was never unpacked or worn.

Dr Paul, an economics historian at the University of Southampton, said: "This garment has been in our family for a number of decades and until recently we were completely unaware there was such an intriguing secret hidden in its folds.
'It was a real surprise when the note fell out.'....
I found the above facts in the BBC, with refernce ot an Isle of Hampshire and Isle of Wight newspaper:
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RonD
post 3rd Aug 2014, 01:32am
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