Glasgow Guide Home

Whats On Glasgow Guide
  Glasgow What's On


    Glasgow Reviews


    Glasgow Gallery


      Glasgow Links
Discuss | Guestbook | Postcard | News | Weather | Feedback | Search | About | What's New
Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )                >> View Today's Topics <<

11 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Glasgow's Shipbuilding Legacy Attacked, Cunard dismisses workers as dishonest
Jupiter
post 14th Feb 2011, 01:16pm
Post #16

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,104
Joined: 27th Oct 2009
From: Home in the`burbs.
Member No.: 7,675
Bankie, a very interesting post fom an"insider".Did you have any personal knowledge of the thefts from the yard or instances where culprits were caught?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rab-oldname
post 14th Feb 2011, 05:17pm
Post #17


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 7,959
Joined: 28th Aug 2003
From: East Sussex.
Member No.: 413
My Uncle Tommy worked on the Queen Elizabeth and he also worked FORCUNARD!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
benny
post 14th Feb 2011, 05:36pm
Post #18


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,734
Joined: 26th Jan 2010
Member No.: 8,059
QUOTE (Jupiter @ 14th Feb 2011, 01:54pm) *
Bankie, a very interesting post fom an"insider".Did you have any personal knowledge of the thefts from the yard or instances where culprits were caught?

Say nothin, Bankie. Joop might still be lookin furra collar. biggrin.gif


--------------------
Derea derego fortibus es in aro
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
**Bankie**
post 14th Feb 2011, 05:36pm
Post #19






Unfortunately I cannot deny that there was some pilfering going on as with vast majority of any factory or working envirionment. I have worked with security and found the employers to be far more dishonest than the guys I worked with in the yard. Can we trust police not to take advantage of a situation.

In fact, what employees would you really trust these days as much as I could trust my fellow shipyard workers?

I remember reading an article in a newspaper about a guy from Dumbarton (called Porter, I think) who had been caught with over 600 worth of goods from the QE2, including 2 portholes some wooden furniture and a piece of carpet. I remember wondering why anybody would steal portholes, but there was a used one on Ebay within the last 2 years which was supposedly off the QE2. I am sure the Dumbarton guy went to prison for his efforts and none of us had any sympathy for him at the time.

I know the odd jar of emulsion paint that we used for marking where cable lines were to be fitted to bulkheads would disappear now and again as I would have the job of walking to the paint shop to get some more. I have also replaced a few small fluorescent light fittings that disappeared from cabin walls as the ship neared completion.

On the other hand, most guys left their tools and toolboxes lying around in the area where they were working and I can honestly say that I cannot recall anybody ever having tools stolen other than a pair of pliers that I had owned.

A Cunard QE2 officer from catering stated on television (shown 2007) that when the ship was in Greenock dry dock and about to be handed over to Cunard, some workers had deliberately smashed most of the bathrooms of one of the decks to delay the handover.

What he probably didn't know, was that as the ship neared completion we workers had to find a keyman to open the door for us if we had a job to do in a cabin as they were all kept locked for safety.

I never heard of any bathrooms being smashed when I worked on board.
The same officer stated that workers were taking mattresses off one gangway while they were still being loaded on another gangway.
So what did he do about it?

Again I had never ever heard of any mattresses being stolen from the ship. There were security gates with a full view of that gangway, so I think that it was very unlikely. We also had security gates at the yard in Clydebank, and the workers were regularly picked at random and searched as they left the yard.

It really is a shame that all the good honest hard working shipyard workers are being tarred with the same brush as as the minority reported by top Cunard officials.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tommy Kennedy
post 14th Feb 2011, 05:54pm
Post #20

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,510
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
Member No.: 54
I was a boy who accompanied my father to watch the launching of Cunarder 534, shortly to be christened Queen Mary and, on that day in 1934 as I stood on the banks of the River Cart to witness this spectacle - Said Old sailor -

Me too - and my Dad said: 'maybe one day you might sail on it' - and I did many years later.
Did five voyages on the Queen Mary (10 weeks - 5 Atlantic crossings) - that was the minium you could do before getting your pay off/signing off.
It was the worst passenger ship I sailed on with the worst conditions and cramped conditions for the crew - Cunard were bad employers, even on their cargo ships.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tommy Kennedy
post 14th Feb 2011, 06:02pm
Post #21

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 3,510
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
Member No.: 54
QUOTE (benny @ 14th Feb 2011, 06:14pm) *
Say nothin, Bankie. Joop might still be lookin furra collar. biggrin.gif

Good job Jupiter hasn't read my posts re-Merchant Navy, Benny rolleyes.gif

The biggest 'culprits ', Jupiter were/- still are -the cops on the dock gates in all the ports with their hands out for bribes - I said 'Still are' - cause I've checked out the docks at Felixstowe when I've visited my daughter in Suffolk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Heather
post 14th Feb 2011, 06:27pm
Post #22


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 11,250
Joined: 23rd Nov 2003
From: Glasgow, Scotland
Member No.: 664
As I said on a previous thread, my husband also worked on the QE2 as a Plumber and was involved in the building of the ship from the start to the finish.

He said it was true a lot of items were stolen, especially carpets. But there were more honest men who worked on the ship than dis-honest one's.

I read Bankie's Post, and that's the first we have heard a 40th year Anniversary lunch.


--------------------
Heather.......I'm tartan. Alba gu Brath. Saor Alba
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dylan
post 14th Feb 2011, 06:53pm
Post #23

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,494
Joined: 27th Oct 2006
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 3,936
I knew a Carpet Fitter who carpeted his stairs with carpet from the QE2.

Every step was a different colour.!


--------------------
You don't need a weatherman
To know which way the wind blows
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GG
post 14th Feb 2011, 09:56pm
Post #24


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
Another interested party, River City actress Barbara Rafferty, was interviewed for the Sunday Mail in 2007 on the occasion of the QE2's last voyage up the Clyde. Her father, David Brown, worked in John Brown's foundry, making portholes for the giant ship. Barbara was 14 when she watched the QE2 launch:

QUOTE
"I was a young schoolgirl when it started. On the day of the launch, I'll never forget standing next to my dad telling everyone, 'My Daddy built that ship!'

The cheers from the crowds were ear-splitting and the men threw their hats into the air.

But the cheers were bittersweet because the launch meant the lay-off of hundreds of workers.

The noise of the tons of chains unfurling as the ship went into the water is another vivid memory. It seemed to me there were miles of chains. The noise was deafening.

How something so big could float is testament to the genius of the men who built her.

Barbara's dad, then 82, added:
QUOTE
"We lived in a tenement close in Livingstone Street and when she was finished, the QE2 was higher than our tenement and longer than the street.

I did a dirty, dangerous job and many men lost their lives. Our wages were 2 a week and there was no chance of us being able to sail on her.

As payback, a bit of pilfering went on in some quarters and it was not unusual for Clydebank's tenement flats to be decked out in the QE2's luxurious carpets, chandeliers and furnishings.

Management never noticed the few bits that went missing."

GG.


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
**Tam**
post 14th Feb 2011, 10:04pm
Post #25






I remember the story of a carpenter in John Brown’s shipyard who smuggled out of the gates each day a small length of the sumptuous wood panelling being used for the interior of one of the Cunard passenger liners. By the time the ship was launched, he had a single end in Clydebank that looked like the dining room of the Queen Mary.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jupiter
post 14th Feb 2011, 10:39pm
Post #26

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 4,104
Joined: 27th Oct 2009
From: Home in the`burbs.
Member No.: 7,675
Well Tommy, as its normally a surreptitious sort of thing to be doing,ie bribing a policeman(and Ive been tested),you must have been very close to the action,or is it hearsay? rolleyes.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Heather
post 14th Feb 2011, 10:57pm
Post #27


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 11,250
Joined: 23rd Nov 2003
From: Glasgow, Scotland
Member No.: 664
In Post 24 is the old man actually saying his wages at the time of building the QE2 was 2.00 a week??
If so, his memory is letting him down.


--------------------
Heather.......I'm tartan. Alba gu Brath. Saor Alba
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GG
post 15th Feb 2011, 01:01am
Post #28


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
Thanks, Heather, I think you are correct as the historical conversion of 2 to present day money is 27.38:

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/historic-inflation-calculator

Obviously this seems wrong. I also checked average wage rates for 1967 on the Financial Times site and it says that average weekly wage for 1967 was 26.53 in 1967 money, 355.94 in today's money. I am going to check this further tomorrow, but I think it might be a technical problem with the conversion of different formats of text between computer systems ... I'm thinking that the real figure quoted by the shipbuilder is actually 20.

GG.


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
TeeHeeHee
post 15th Feb 2011, 01:04am
Post #29


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 14,261
Joined: 25th Jan 2009
From: German/French/Swiss border town on the River Rhein
Member No.: 6,448
QUOTE
I knew a Carpet Fitter who carpeted his stairs with carpet from the QE2

It wasn't only the shipbuilding industry. I knew a guy whose every stair, lobby or corridor was covered in aircraft carpets; all right if you liked dark blue rolleyes.gif
One time I contracted at BL when a bunch of their workers were caught building 12 complete Range Rovers at home!
In the aircraft industry you daren't leave your tool box unlocked. You notice a tool gone ... where is it? Nicked? On the aircraft somewhere?
It was dreadful.
One guy came to me; in Holland, from an other hangar to borrow a riveting tool. I had had it specially made for me; a one off, in Sweden. A great tool. Everyone borrowed it. So I gave it to him; about 11am.
After lunch I went to get it back because I needed it and asked a mate which aircraft was the guy (workin') on. He says. "He's on the 12 o' clock to London, mate."
My riveting tool as well.
I worked in Bremen on the Tornado centre-section build when a bunch of Geordie lads got laid off from a shipyard in Hamburg and the agency sent them to work on the aircraft-build with us. Weldin' things down was a waste of time with the Geordies'.
Maybe it is just a British thing: an island monkey thing. tongue.gif


--------------------
"Destiny is a good thing to accept when it's going your way. When it isn't, don't call it destiny; call it injustice, treachery, or simple bad luck.”
― Joseph Heller, God Knows
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GG
post 15th Feb 2011, 01:19am
Post #30


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
THH, I think that's the crux of the problem with Cunard. The fact is that petty pilfering happened in any heavy industry in the sixties; Glasgow was no different from Belfast, Newcastle or Liverpool in this respect. However, what Glaswegian workers achieved beyond work produced at any other yard in the UK, or the world for that matter, was to build arguably "the greatest ship the world has ever known". Maybe Cunard should have cause to thank the workers of the Clyde for that considerable feat, rather than tarnish the image of great men, many of whom died as a result of exposure to asbestos in the yards!

QUOTE
Introducing The QE2

Many people believe she was the greatest ship ever. Here's just some of the reasons why.

She was the flagship of the British Merchant fleet for 35 years from her entry into service in 1969 until her replacement arrived in 2004. She was the last of many British-built Transatlantic Liners, born on the Clyde using the skills and knowledge that had built her legendary predecessors. She was fast and extremely strong, the last express transatlantic liner, designed to operate across the formidable Atlantic for decades at high speed - 5 night crossings, but capable of doing it in 4. She was world-famous and a household name. "QE2" meant ultra-luxury, something big, something for the rich and famous. She travelled further (6 million miles) than any other ship ever has, or ever will, at average speeds that modern cruise ships aren't capable of at all. She was a heroine of the Falklands War, the only ship capable of transporting a huge number of soldiers at high speeds, thousands of miles.

She was stunningly beautiful. She was a maritime design classic, both inside and out. In 1969, after her 'staid' predecessors had retired, QE2 was a revelation. Ultra-luxurious, ultra-modern "space age" design (see photo below), she was the best that the British Swinging Sixties had to offer, from our very best designers.

Lots of 'experts' at the time said she'd be laid up or even scrapped but her advanced, forward-thinking design meant that she wasn't. Not even close. She saved Cunard. She made money. Lots of money and she continued to do so. She was dual-purpose, and just as well suited to a tropical cruise as to the Atlantic ocean. The 70s and 80s passed by with her receiving lots of updates and money spent on her, for she was worth it. ...

Read more about the history of the QE2 here, by a GG boards member:

http://www.theqe2story.com/aboutQE2/index.html

GG.

Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image

 


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

11 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd Aug 2019

All material in the site Glasgow Guide is copyright of the Glasgow Guide Organisation. This material is for your own private use only, and no part of the site may be reproduced, amended, modified, copied, or transmitted to third parties, by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. All rights reserved.

Glasgow Hotels: book cheap hotels in Glasgow online now.