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> Glasgow: Is The Truth Still Too Painful?, New Thomas Cook guide book criticised
GG
post 19th Sep 2010, 08:23pm
Post #16


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The vote is drawn exactly at 50/50 after 100 responses.

I take on board what has been written about the vote not being the whole story, however, I was hoping that the more important issues such as what kind of material should go into a tourist guide book would be explored in the comments/discussion ... and they have been.

On a related point, I note that the problems highlighted by the Thomas Cook guide regarding the alleged conduct of Old firm fans does not stop it marketing Old Firm games on its sport site:

QUOTE
Thomas Cook Sport are delighted to offer official match breaks to watch Celtic play at Celtic Park. All packages include a minimum of one night's accommodation, your match ticket, plus a tour of the stadium and entry to the club museum.

Come and see your favourite team play. Why not bring your friend, partner or even the whole family and make it a break to remember in Glasgow. See the sights, eat out, take in a trip to the theatre or shop 'til you drop. Glasgow has so much to offer. Demand is expected to be high from Celtic fans wanting to see their heroes, so book now to avoid disappointment.

Example:

Celtic v Rangers Gold £199.00 24 Oct 10 12:45

http://www.thomascooksport.com/Football/Sc...r-League/Celtic

GG.


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*Scoosh*
post 19th Sep 2010, 08:44pm
Post #17






I agree that all cities worldwide have their seemy side, but to single out Glasgow, I'm afraid Thomas Cook has gone too far. I think Thomas Cook might experience a bit of a baklash here, and I will certainly think twice before booking another holiday with that company. Shame on you.

Scoosh
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campsie
post 19th Sep 2010, 09:25pm
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I have been back to glasgow three times in the past 20yrs the last one a few weeks ago, and i must say that the guide book seems to be unfair in that it does not describe the glasgow of how it appears today. i have be impressed with the citys progress, it's people are of the most welcoming you will find anywhere, and it has history to be proud of, and culture galore. ok the weather is a lottery at best, but thats the uk not just glasgow. slums, football fans and the like can be found in any city in the world, and glasgow on a friday and saturday night is nothing like you would find in bristol in fact compared to bristol glasgow is tame. even when glasgow was at the height of its gangs i never felt threatened and waiting for a bus at midnight in the city centre in the 60's felt safe to me. yes glasgow has had its problems but the worst of them was way back in the late forties through the fifty's and when you look back at the poverty and the loss of jobs due to the demise of our shipbuilding i think glasgow is doing a very good job of keeping up with progress. it also has to cope with large numbers of unemplyed people which also has a drain on resources but when you think of all it has to deal with i think it is a great city and that is due to its people and the pride they have in glasgow and long may that be.
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**markybhoy81**
post 19th Sep 2010, 09:36pm
Post #19






As a resident of Glasgow I have to say that Thomas Cook are correct in most of what they say. For all the sugar coating, the top class shops, bars and restaurants in the city centre, there are some of Europe's most deprived areas within 10 minutes walk.

The city fathers need to recognise that no amount of sugar coating is going to erase this issue. However, I have to say that Thomas Cook may have done irreparable damage to the tourist trade and absolutely nothing to help the the eradication of the 'no mean city' image.

Maybe you should think twice Thomas Cook!
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TeeHeeHee
post 19th Sep 2010, 10:10pm
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The town over the hill from here, Lörrach; where I was operated on 5 weeks ago, just had a woman go into the hospital earlier this evening and blow away 4 people with an automatic and kneecapped a cop. Whether the cops took her out or whether she blew herself away is something we'll learn in the next day or two.
Lörrach is a town in a valley on the Black Forest foothills bordering on Switzerland; doesn't even have a football team worth mentioning.
Nothing much in the way of culture in comparison to Glasgow although it does have a cinema.
For a Black Forest (edge) town it does have it's share of drunks, thieves, muggings, dealers and child molesters ... but its got two hospitals to compensate for all that.
Off course you wont find any of this in the tour guides.
Why should you?
Glasgow on the other hand has probably all this and more on a scale to fit it's population.
Glasgow also has a culture second to none and that is what tour guides are all about and that is what should have been emphasised; not the downside which is a part of any great city world wide. I left Scotland, more or less, before I was twenty and spent the best part of my life from then in cities where you felt naked if you weren't carrying. ( I had worse nights in Blantyre rolleyes.gif ) No mention of that in the tour guides.
A tour guide is primarily to promote points of interest to visitors.
There's an abundance of those in Glasgow in particular and Scotland in general. (Ask my big German mate Kriss wink.gif )


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*Rose Mary Morris*
post 19th Sep 2010, 10:45pm
Post #21






Born in Glasgows Duke St Hospital and raised in Castlemilk (a mostly tenement cul.ture) until at 18 when I emigrated to Canada due unfortunately to a family tragedy. I have and always will be proud to say "I am from Glasgow" I get back when I can and am proud of what Glasgow has accomplished considering that all work was striped from Glasgow in the 60's and people did well just to keep food on the table. I have travelled the world and there is not one place on the face of this earth without problems but there are damned few with such great people who acknowledge each other on the street, who help neighbour to neighbour and who welcome visitors with open arms. Please, visit the beauty that is Glasgow, steeped rich in art, culture, warmth and charm with great history to boot. Make sure everyone knows you are a visitor, they will greet you with open arms. Ofcourse don't be stupid enough to go out at night alone or to a Rangers & Celtic match without a crowd of peace loving people around you, don't go to more deserted or baron parts of the City, it's like everywhere else, it has it's bad side but don't think for one moment that the good won't very far outweigh the bad, I can assure you it will. Thinking of a vacation, travel all of Scotland, it will take your breath away, but don't miss Glasgows Botanic Gardens or Art Museum, have a nice meal in Glasgows trendy Merchant City, go dancing, have fun and remember GlasgowSmilesBetter!
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Mathieson
post 19th Sep 2010, 10:46pm
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"written by Edinburgh writer Zoe Ross" says it all for me.

Pure dead jealousy, by the way. smile.gif


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*glesgacrossboy*
post 19th Sep 2010, 11:23pm
Post #23






I spent six wonderfull weeks in my old hometown last year , not having been back since I left in 1959. it was with a great amount of interpredation and I must say a bit of nervisness that I stept off the plane at Glesga airport, but hell as soon as my feet hit the ground I felt like I had never left the old city, during my stay i visited all my old haunts around the Glesga cross , had a a number of trips to the barras , and walked around the Calton and Brigton for hours on end never feeling frightend or threatend at all. I am planning a trip back next year and Iam sure I will have another fantastic holiday, thers naeboady like the Glesga folk go an bile yer heed cooky

fae Australia doonunder Glesgacrossboy
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Katie Mac
post 19th Sep 2010, 11:38pm
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I feel that the Thomas Cook travel book is wrong to only highlight the negative aspects of the city. Every city in the world has these sort of challenges with drunkenness, graffiti and the like. Even Edinburgh has its, shall we say, Slummy areas. I have looked at the u-tube re Easterhouse, now come on folks a lot of those houses are empty and derelict. It was also 2008 when that was done. Were the houses up for demolition or were they being re-furbished?

When I was back in Glasgow in 1980 I was a bit disturbed by the look of the place, I was back in 1982 and things had changed for the better. I was then back in 1999 and the city looked great also in 2004. Sorry to say I have not been back since but I do have family in Glasgow and they inform me that the city is a wonderful place. OK not the place they wish to be out in on a Saturday night as the young ones are out in full force drinking. This I know is also the situation in New Zealand. Wellington, Auckland, Christchurch all have similar problems with alcohol. So let's not dwell on the negative. I think Thomas Cook should retract their guide book and re-print one with the positive side to Glasgow Tourism as Glasgow has a lot to offer tourists. More than most of us who lived there were aware of at the time as we took it all for granted. smile.gif
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proudmaryhiller
post 20th Sep 2010, 12:17am
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I love my city and I'm proud to be a weegie! actually it could be snowing in springtime so that's a load of rubbish, you could get four season's in one day here biggrin.gif fed up listening to Glasgow being trashed, I wouldn't live any where else.


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irrie
post 20th Sep 2010, 04:22am
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Taken individually the comments are mostly true but could be applied to any big city.Go to Milan Amsterdam or any city that has two big football teams and i dont think you would want to meet crowds of fans.We all know Glasgow has problems but most people are still the best youll meet anywhere I am proud to call myself a Glaswegian
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weebren3
post 20th Sep 2010, 04:49am
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I think in most countrys,or tourist agents only show the best parts of A country,not the parts of slum area's people dont live like that because they chose to,they dont have choices.When the counsel go with the powers that be,thats parliment in Londen,make cuts in jobs etc..That is the sad part that the english still run our country,it needs to change and have more snp to help make changes.I know it is up to people to change the policy fight for your rights. Poverty is in every country but we do have A lot of history in Scotland,I am proud of that.
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wiznayme
post 20th Sep 2010, 05:19am
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I think Thomas Cooks are way out of order here.
Does the tourist brochure for Hull mention that it tops the league for most acts of violence against the person for 2009/2010?
Does the tourist brochure for Durham mention that it hosts the most deprived area in the UK?
You can bet your sweet butt it doesn't, so why should Glasgow's shortcomings be highlighted?
There was obviously an ulterior motive by the author.
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*Guest*
post 20th Sep 2010, 05:51am
Post #29






I am annoyed at what passes for travel writing these days. If I buy a tourist guide, I want something that points out what could be interesting for me to see and do. This is a wholly inappropriate place for an amateur to air her opinions about a city. She probably never really went to Glasgow but read a lot of old hyperbole about the history of the city.

Tourists go to a city to see what the city has to offer, not to inspect the state of social housing schemes and check out the diet of the locals.

Glasgow is an interesting city and a springboard to the beauties of the surrounding areas of the Trossachs, Ayrshire and the inner islands. The wealth of art galleries, mansion houses and museums in Glasgow reflect the 'dialogue' between richer families and the working class background that was at the heart of the city, which in the 70s was one of the biggest in Europe (if I remember well), even if it was one of the poorest.

Go to Naples, for example. Naples is no better than Glasgow in a lot of ways and worse than some. Naples, like Sicily, shares a history of violence but that kind of violence is not against tourists, but between gangs and individuals and hidden. Some of Italy looks terribly run down. And don't give me the old Mediterranean diet stuff because pizza is not a constituent part of it, nor is pasta - and even olive oil should be used in reasonable quantities. Italy was blessed with a climate that produces a wider range of veggies and fruit than Scotland, but there are still obese people there.

I am not running Italy down. Its beautiful, its fantastic. The social aspects aren't important to me in the sense of keeping me away. What is important is the place and what happened there, its history and culture. Glasgow also has history as one of the cities that was an engine of the industrial revolution. A city with religious diversity, a strong sense of itself and its place in industries that are also being relegated to history.
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GG
post 20th Sep 2010, 06:58am
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For comparison, here's what the Lonely Planet guide says about Glasgow:

QUOTE
Glasgow is regenerating and evolving at a dizzying pace – style cats beware, this city is edgy, modish and downright ballsy. Its Victorian architectural legacy is now swamped with cutting-edge style bars, world-class venues to tickle your taste buds, and a hedonistic club culture that will bring out your nocturnal instincts. Best of all, though, is Glasgow’s pounding live-music scene which is one of the best in Britain, and accessible through countless venues dedicated to homegrown beats.

The city is going through a long-term transformation, evident along the revitalised River Clyde, where visitors can explore Glasgow’s mighty maritime heritage along riverfront walkways. Museums and galleries abound and the city’s resume has been made even more impressive with the reopening of the colossal Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum – which, in typical Glaswegian fashion, strips the city of any false pretences and tells it like it is – both the inspiring and the infuriating aspects of life here.

Glasgow combines urban mayhem and black humour and is so friendly, it’s sometimes downright unnerving – throw off the shackles of urban restraint and immerse yourself in a down-to-earth metropolis that is all about fun. And besides, where else in the world can you land in the middle of a city in a seaplane?

Glaswegians are proud of their working class background and leftist traditions. Their rivalry with Edinburgh is fierce and folk are full of contempt for what they see as a prissy, right-wing establishment on the east coast, full of toffs with clipped accents and, infuriatingly, holding the title of capital city. However Glaswegians remind themselves that Edinburgh may be the capital, but Glasgow has the capital,

... and to be fair to Thomas Cook, their guide does praise Glasgow for its "vibrant" arts scene, high culture, green spaces and shopping.

GG.


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