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> School Finishing Times When We Were Young, A question or two
ashfield
post 5th Nov 2014, 03:19pm
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QUOTE (Alex MacPhee @ 5th Nov 2014, 02:46pm) *
Never liked the smell of chlorine, though!


Certainly agree with that Alex, I prefer swimming in the sea but that's mainly because of the increased bouyancy. I also prefer the temperature of the Med Sea to either our North Sea or Atlantic Ocean rolleyes.gif


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Betsy2009
post 5th Nov 2014, 04:11pm
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Talk of the devil ...

"Campaigners have called on Ofsted to name and shame primary schools that don’t teach their pupils to swim after figures showed almost half leave at 11 without being able to complete a length in the pool.

Under the national curriculum, schools are required to teach pupils to swim confidently over a distance of at least 25 metres, use a range of strokes effectively and safely rescue themselves if they get into difficulties."

http://www.msn.com/en-gb/health/cardio/pri...d5Xri?ocid=iehp
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gardenqueen
post 5th Nov 2014, 04:45pm
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QUOTE (mlconnelly @ 5th Nov 2014, 01:59pm) *
The pool you remember GQ, is Woodside swimming bath and is still going but very different from what it was then. Does anyone remember the female pool attendant from the 60s? If memory serves, she had dark hair and looked like a man, I think her name was either Maggie or Betty. I was only wee at the time so could be completely wrong but either way she frightened the life out of me. Mary ����


Thanks, Mary, that was the one. I do remember a rather formidable lady (wearing a brown uniform?) who was in charge of making sure you got out when your time was up and generally supervising the area.

The best thing for me was buying soup for a machine when you were finished.
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mairead
post 5th Nov 2014, 06:30pm
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Scots Kiwi Lass,
That's when I was at NK as well. We may know each other. I left in 4th year in1956 (I think) smile.gif


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*Guest*
post 5th Nov 2014, 11:57pm
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QUOTE (enrique @ 5th Nov 2014, 10:35am) *
rolleyes.gif when attending Govan High in the late 50s we used to have 2 periods of swimming every 2 weeks , we went to Greenfield school , this was near our main building for Govan High, we went there although there was a public pool at Harhill street around the corner, never helped me as i was scared of the water , but manged to swim in my early teens , thank goodness as my future family all love the water and are great swimmers

Was same at St.Gerard's two periods swimming one week and two periods o'fit'ba the following.
I did my life saving certificate at St.G's and got a free pass for a year to the Summerton rd. baths.
Funny thing about hooman nature; I did not go nearly as much when it was free as I did when I had tae paye.
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JAGZ1876
post 6th Nov 2014, 08:48pm
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My School (Grange Secondary Castlemilk) had only been open the year before i left primary so it had it's own pool in which i learned to swim.

School times were 9-4, kids these days don't know they're born. laugh.gif
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taurus
post 6th Nov 2014, 09:23pm
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I went to the convent in Charlotte St in the 50`s,and this is a true story,we all lay on the floor on mats in the gym and the sports teacher showed us how to move our arms and legs in the swimming action. That was the extent of my swimming lessons,I`m terrified of water,and it would have been more practical to take us to a pool for swimming lessons,instead of the hours and hours wasted showing us the inside of a plant or a leaf,or drawing the map of South America. and so on and on. A waste of 3 years,and brains that needed opening with real education,I couldn`t wait to get out of the place,9 to 4 it was then. Education really starts when you leave school.Although I must admit,a lot of things the teacher in the primary school taught me,have stuck with me all these years,but not that secondary school.
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xxjinkyxx
post 7th Nov 2014, 03:01pm
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St pius secondary in drumchapel had swimming lessons i went there and always took a note to get out of it hated swimming of course i aways wrote the not myself hehehe
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gardenqueen
post 11th Nov 2014, 08:00am
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QUOTE (xxjinkyxx @ 7th Nov 2014, 03:18pm) *
St pius secondary in drumchapel had swimming lessons i went there and always took a note to get out of it hated swimming of course i aways wrote the not myself hehehe


I used to write my own notes to get out of P.E. I became quite inventive.

I remember once writing that the boiler had exploded when I was home at lunchtime and the house was flooded as a result.

It did get me out of P.E. but I wonder if the teacher believed me.
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Dave Grieve
post 11th Nov 2014, 09:03am
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Took our grand kids out for dinner on Saturday night and got talking about school and the way kids are taught today, they couldn't believe
1. that we used quills to write with and
2. that we could have an entire period just practicing our writing skills? or in my case how best to use a blotter laugh.gif

Then last night watching a TV programme where one of the characters was using a ball point pen to write down something I realised another difference, there was no scratching noise on the paper as they wrote unlike the old quills
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Alex MacPhee
post 11th Nov 2014, 10:59am
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Funny how these tiny wee memories re-surface decades later, when it seemed you'd entirely forgotten them! I remember going home with ink stains all down the side of my left pinky and hand (I'm left-handed) from writing in the hand-writing exercise jotter, and the blotter that measured about 3"x4". I always liked to have a brand new blotter, and watch it slowly fill up with ink as the days and the dictation drills passed!

At first, the dipping pens we used were just bare nibs, so you'd to dip them in the inkwell after every word or word and a half. Then we got pens with wee reservoir clips behind the nib, and they were a great thing, because you could go a whole sentence without dipping. And if you pressed too hard, the nib ends splayed out and you got a great big blot on your jotter.

Oh, and inkwells. A ceramic or bakelite plastic inkpot on every desk, set in a wee hole, and the teacher's pet (aye, I remember Aileen McCusker!) would go round the class with the big bottle of Stevens' ink with the dispenser on the end, and top up everyone's inkpot.

Writing with ballpoints might have been easier and not as messy, but it will never be as pleasing an experience as writing with a proper ink pen. That's how I still write all my letters.


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gardenqueen
post 11th Nov 2014, 01:56pm
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QUOTE (Alex MacPhee @ 11th Nov 2014, 11:16am) *
Funny how these tiny wee memories re-surface decades later, when it seemed you'd entirely forgotten them! I remember going home with ink stains all down the side of my left pinky and hand (I'm left-handed) from writing in the hand-writing exercise jotter, and the blotter that measured about 3"x4". I always liked to have a brand new blotter, and watch it slowly fill up with ink as the days and the dictation drills passed!

At first, the dipping pens we used were just bare nibs, so you'd to dip them in the inkwell after every word or word and a half. Then we got pens with wee reservoir clips behind the nib, and they were a great thing, because you could go a whole sentence without dipping. And if you pressed too hard, the nib ends splayed out and you got a great big blot on your jotter.

Oh, and inkwells. A ceramic or bakelite plastic inkpot on every desk, set in a wee hole, and the teacher's pet (aye, I remember Aileen McCusker!) would go round the class with the big bottle of Stevens' ink with the dispenser on the end, and top up everyone's inkpot.

Writing with ballpoints might have been easier and not as messy, but it will never be as pleasing an experience as writing with a proper ink pen. That's how I still write all my letters.


I remember getting the new pens with the reservoir. The main part was a marbled effect, a bit like when all the plasticine was mixed together into a marbled pattern.

Handwriting was important and I hated it as I was clumsy - probably be a label for it now, in fact I know there is - I used to envy those neat little girls whose work always looked perfect. I think it was the Marion Richardson method we used, up light and down heavier to make our writing look good. They brought in italic writing when I was half way through primary and then I just gave up and my writing is now a mix of both styles. Thank goodness for computer writing.
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bilbo.s
post 11th Nov 2014, 02:14pm
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I tend to think good handwriting is hereditary. My father wrote beautiful copperplate. Unfortunately the gene passed me by and my son also. My sister inherited it and her son too.

I used to hate the stupid pens and nibs at school - we had to make our own nib cleaners with several layers of felt stitched together. The feeling of using them on a rusty, ink-clogged nib made me grit my teeth. I a sure that those dreadful implements completely ruined my handwriting forever. Later on I graduated to a Platignum fountain pen and then a Conway Stewart with gold-plated nib - far better than yon scratchy abominations.


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angel
post 11th Nov 2014, 02:35pm
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Writing with a pen and ink , my that brings back memories , I always enjoyed learning how to write , our teacher in primary school was a stickler for good penmanship and we would be given extra marks if we wrote well , she always said that our writing had to look like a picture smile.gif " light upward strokes with a heavier downward , and this she always reminded her class . WE only began to use fountain pens in the qualifying class and by the time we got to Sen.Sec. the Biro was the pen of the day . So that was the end of our beautiful written pictures . smile.gif


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Alex MacPhee
post 11th Nov 2014, 02:51pm
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QUOTE (gardenqueen @ 11th Nov 2014, 02:13pm) *
Handwriting was important and I hated it as I was clumsy - probably be a label for it now, in fact I know there is - I used to envy those neat little girls whose work always looked perfect. I think it was the Marion Richardson method we used, up light and down heavier to make our writing look good. They brought in italic writing when I was half way through primary and then I just gave up and my writing is now a mix of both styles. Thank goodness for computer writing.


We must be ages, or close enough. I remember the method with heavier downstrokes and lighter upstrokes, though I didn't know it what it was called then, but today I'd call it copperplate. I do remember italic writing being brought in, and I remember not liking it as much. Eventually, we got ball point pens, in the last year at primary. They had the advantage of not needing such careful handling, though I didn't find them as pleasant to use. And by the time we got to secondary school, there were no dipping pens, it was all ballpoints. Writing had to be faster, with all the different classes we now had, and ink pens don't lend themselves to faster writing.

Over the last decade or so, I've found that writing with a ball point makes my wrist ache, and so my legibility suffers. Recently, I went back to using a good fountain pen, and it's been noticeably easier to write. It slows me down for one, and lets me concentrate on forming my letters, with less physical strain. I use two nibs mainly, a long soft one for copperplate, and a short angled one for italic script. Being a left-hander, I have to have the left-handed italic nib, which is slightly turned to the left to help with the action of dragging the nib across the writing line.

Typing is a handy skill, though, and I taught myself to touch-type, after watching how good my sister was after she was trained in typing.

I'm glad we did penmanship at school, and I think my grandchildren are missing out on something.


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