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> Rounders Or Other Street Games, history
Chrissie
post 7th Apr 2011, 05:36am
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Bilbo, Actually I do think I remember your pigeon fancier, though not his name. Two guys hung out there a lot one about 5 feet and the other taller. We never knew their names but the smaller guy was christened the sheriffby my wee pal. She said he looked liked he was guarding the place. He had no uniform so we decided he couldn't be named named guard, He always gave us a big smile and said hello.
Our doctor was McGlone. The family was split on that. Two of my sisters preferred a lady doctor but I can't remember her name. Even back then she seemed elderly - I think her first name was Annabell or Adelaide or something like that. I don't think she ever took her hat off. She took good care of my sisters anyway. I had McGlone and he wasn't my favorite. He was in partnership with Flaherty and Bowie but Dr. Flaherty retired and Dr. Bowie moved to Texas and I didn't get a vote at the time because I was too wee. Dr. Capaldi had a good reputation.
I don't know if you'll remember the off license shop at the corner of Blair Street and the main road. It was a good size and different from most. When you went in the door there was tins of broken biscuits everywhere. I don't know what he made the most money from the booze or the biscuits. I remember he would get the biscuits delivered one day a week and by the time the week was nearly over he'd be down to a couple of tins. We used to go their and buy the broken biscuits for coppers then along the road to Prestons or Lexies fruit shops and get some chipped fruit. Then up the park we went and had our picnic. We were both avid readers. During the school holidays we went to the library nearly every weekday.
You're right about the Eusebis and Cocozzas. The were really nice people. I think a lot of it had to do with them being happy most of the time. They seemed to appreciate life and everything they had and didn't mind working long hours since they were also sociable people. smile.gif
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TeeHeeHee
post 7th Apr 2011, 08:44am
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QUOTE (Chrissie @ 30th Mar 2011, 03:19am) *
Add a penny worth o' hel' salts to dip your finger in and stick it in your mouth to experience the fizz and you had a perfect day.

A lot of kids today are still intae that but it's more expensive. tongue.gif
Have a perfect day. tongue.gif biggrin.gif


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bilbo.s
post 7th Apr 2011, 10:38am
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QUOTE (Chrissie @ 7th Apr 2011, 07:53am) *
Bilbo, Actually I do think I remember your pigeon fancier, though not his name. Two guys hung out there a lot one about 5 feet and the other taller. We never knew their names but the smaller guy was christened the sheriffby my wee pal. She said he looked liked he was guarding the place. He had no uniform so we decided he couldn't be named named guard, He always gave us a big smile and said hello.
Our doctor was McGlone. The family was split on that. Two of my sisters preferred a lady doctor but I can't remember her name. Even back then she seemed elderly - I think her first name was Annabell or Adelaide or something like that. I don't think she ever took her hat off. She took good care of my sisters anyway. I had McGlone and he wasn't my favorite. He was in partnership with Flaherty and Bowie but Dr. Flaherty retired and Dr. Bowie moved to Texas and I didn't get a vote at the time because I was too wee. Dr. Capaldi had a good reputation.
I don't know if you'll remember the off license shop at the corner of Blair Street and the main road. It was a good size and different from most. When you went in the door there was tins of broken biscuits everywhere. I don't know what he made the most money from the booze or the biscuits. I remember he would get the biscuits delivered one day a week and by the time the week was nearly over he'd be down to a couple of tins. We used to go their and buy the broken biscuits for coppers then along the road to Prestons or Lexies fruit shops and get some chipped fruit. Then up the park we went and had our picnic. We were both avid readers. During the school holidays we went to the library nearly every weekday.
You're right about the Eusebis and Cocozzas. The were really nice people. I think a lot of it had to do with them being happy most of the time. They seemed to appreciate life and everything they had and didn't mind working long hours since they were also sociable people. smile.gif

Chrissie,

Johnny McConnachie would have been the wee guy- he wore a bunnet usually. Maybe it was my dad you saw talking to him, as they were quite friendly - he was a six-footer, thin with a wee mustache.

I do not recall the off-licence- I was teetotal at the time laugh.gif but in that area there was a sweetie shop with brilliant home-made candy balls. There was also a bakery where we used to get rolls about 11 at night.

If you go to Google Maps and search for Blair Street, you will see that Eusebi´s Deli is near where Cocozza´s café used to be. Do you remember the Franchetti café in Wellshot Road ? They were cousins of the Ferris of the State Café where I mis-spent my youth, bewitched by Silvia- around 1959-63.

I well remember Lexies and also Ritchies the bike shop, where my dad bought me an air rifle for Christmas ( I was only 9 !!).

Sadly the whole area is very depressing now. Tollcross Park is not the same without the children´s museum with "Who Killed Cock Robin".


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Chrissie
post 10th Apr 2011, 01:31am
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Bilbo
It's hard to judge height when you're a wean. It probably was your dad.

The bakery you mention was Docherty's. Best well-fired rolls in the area, including Dalzielle's. The bakery was in Cree St. Blair and Cree Sts. were the same St. really. On the side leading into the park it was Cree St. By the way there was a big family of Cocozzas there - no relation to Charlie. The other side leading to the back road is/was Blair St. You'd not know Ferguson's was a licensed grocer by the windows since they were full of biscuits usually. I'd hiv tae say I more than likely was a tt masel back then since they didnae sell hooch to 9 year aulds. rolleyes.gif

I don't remember a cafe in Wellshot. Yet I remember buying sweeties when we went to the pics in Wellshot. Was it at oor end or up by the picture hoose? I think that hall showed the oldest flicks in Glesgow but it was usually open on a Sunday so we went when we were teenagers winchin since back then most of the guys were either still going to school or learning a trade and Glesga's macho men insisted on paying. Since we lassies were usually also skint by Sunday sometimes if we had seen the local pics we went for walks up and doon Broadway and went into cafes where we sipped hot oranges fur hoors. Doesn't sound like much but we were very happy. smile.gif
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bilbo.s
post 10th Apr 2011, 10:34am
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I cannot remember the name of theFacchetti café but it was at the Shettleston Road end, across from the church, practically next to Cochranes´s grocers. You must be referring to Green´s Tollcross cinema. We used to go there on a Friday night, when they showed serials like " Superman and the Atom Man". Bit of a dump compared to the Palaceum and State.

Ah - hot orange - what nostalgia. Does anybody drink that nowadays? I doubt it. What years did you spend in Shettleston ? I was 1942 - 1955 but still frequented the State Café until about 1963.

Yes, café society was alive and well in those days - just like the Left Bank in Paris haha.

BTW just looked up the 1911 census ( just released) and found my grandparents, father and aunts at 210 Main Street, which became 844 Shettleston Road.


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Scots Kiwi Lass
post 10th Apr 2011, 12:57pm
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I grew up in Hinshaw Street, Maryhill and can remember playing rounders, usually round the corner in Doncaster Street. It all depended on somebody being able to get hold of a cricket bat or some other kind of bat. We would be out there till near dark in the summer and our mammy had to call us in for bed.

I've got happy memories too of sitting on the stairs of our close, swapping scraps with our friends. We would keep them between the pages of an old book.

In the summer, a gang of us would put on a stairheid concert. All the kids paid a few pennies and sat up the stairs, watching the grand performance, put on by as many kids as could be persuaded to sing, dance, tell jokes or recite a poem. If we got enough money we would send it into Pat Rolland (I think was his name) in the Daily Record, to donate to the Eastpark Home. I did hear at some stage that they took their "cut" before forwarding the money.


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tombro
post 11th Apr 2011, 11:10am
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Great to hear from Scots Kiwi Lass !

I remember playing most of the games mentioned above but one of our favourite activities in 'theDrum' was to chalk make believe roads and streets in the rosd and ride our trikes, bikes and carts around, obeying the Street Code.

We used to start so early in those Summer Mornings and would still be going well into the night, until we were finally called in off the streets !

Tombro smile.gif


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Chrissie
post 16th Apr 2011, 11:50pm
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Bilbo - Lived in Shettleston from 1946 - 1957. Lived in the south side for while where I was born, then Barlanark, but never lost touch with Shettleston. Still went dancing there and visited with pals. At that point in time I think the dancing had moved from the welfare hall and Wellshot Rd to the Eastmuir Masonic. After 1960 I didn't really hang out there at all, except to catch transportation. Some of my pals went on to the dancing in Baillieston but it wasn't my cup of tea.
Your news of the closing of the children's museum in the park was so sad. sad.gif It was the focal point of that place. We never passed it by and went from there to the hot house and down a wee path to a secluded area that a lovely wee burn flowed through.

Kiwi Lass - Rounders was fun to watch but I hated when my turn came up. I don't think I ever hit that ball. wub.gif Did better at ropes and ball - remember bouncing double balls off the wall? smile.gif
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penny dainty
post 18th Apr 2011, 07:13am
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Remember the elastic ropes , we made them out of elastic bands and did all sorts of tricks and skipping and stuff wi them


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Dunvegan
post 24th Apr 2011, 05:40am
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Games came and went seasonaly but you'd never notice the pattern when you were young. There was a time for keepie uppie, rounders, peever, headies, fitba' aw summer lang, kick the can; a variation o' hide an seek. The lassies games wi chalk an rope, peerries, bools, an' board games, snakes n' ladders played up closes when it rained. We never had the opportunity tae spend hours in front of the television, nor were there video games, Ipods; we even knew a' the songs. Did making oor ain entertainment make us better equipped tae function in a hard environment and make us better able to function later in life. When I see the disintegration in society in modern Glasgow it make me think. It was a much poorer place in terms of affluence but it was a fer sicht richer in social terms than the disengagement and alienation seen today.
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bilbo.s
post 24th Apr 2011, 07:40am
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Absolutely right. smile.gif


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Melody
post 24th Apr 2011, 10:36am
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I think that a big part of this problem these days is that parents often don't engage enough with their children. The best games of rounders or ropes for girls was when the mums came out and played with us as well on a summer's evening. smile.gif A lot of children in high school don't even know how to play draughts or snakes and ladders. It was all part of learning social interaction and your so right it taught us all many things Dunvegan. smile.gif We must have been as fit as fiddles in comparison with todays children..
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Scots Kiwi Lass
post 24th Apr 2011, 11:39am
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Chrissie - I can well remember playing doublers off the walls of the tenements, at the same time going through a range of songs - I wish I could remember what they were but I know one song ran on to another. If I think of any of them, I will let you know.

When I see the kids wearing roller skates and blades today it take me back to my childhood days in Hinshaw Street. For some reason, I only had one roller skate (my kids roll their eyes at this) and it was strapped on to your shoe. Anyway, I had loads of fun with it, also a wooden scooter I got one Christmas.

I wonder what games our great-grandchildren will be playing in the years to come.


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Chrissie
post 26th Apr 2011, 04:49am
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Kiwi Lass - Your one skate brought back memories. Same skates I bet, metal that had straps through them for your shoes. One Christmas my wee pal got skates and I got a bike. We ran aroon that year with one skate each. Although we were warned not to do it we would go around the corner and I would stand while pedaling and Megan would sit on the saddle with her legs stuck out so as not to touch the wheel. We had so much fun with them. rolleyes.gif

I remember singing the songs while playing doublers. Don't remember tham. One began with one two three aleary.Remember the fancy footwork? 1. LIft leg up and put the ball under, 2. Staand astride and put ball through the back of your legs. 3. Cross your left leg over your right sideways and put the ball through there. We didn't know it but we must have been fit as fiddles. smile.gif
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angel
post 26th Apr 2011, 04:46pm
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I remember another pastime as a child was playing with a gird and cleat,
an old bicycle wheel without it's tire and a short length of wood to guide
the wheel, " great fun" biggrin.gif and we ran along the streets like the wind guiding it all the way.


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