Glasgow Guide Home

Whats On Glasgow Guide
  Glasgow What's On


    Glasgow Reviews


    Glasgow Gallery


      Glasgow Links
Discuss | Guestbook | Postcard | News | Weather | Feedback | Search | About | What's New
Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )                >> View Today's Topics <<

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Ever Heard Of 'the Cheeky 40' ?
Paulines47
post 3rd Oct 2009, 11:38pm
Post #1


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 889
Joined: 3rd Oct 2009
From: Southampton, Hampshire
Member No.: 7,555
Hi. I'm a 'soft southerner' trying to find out about a notorious gang in Glasgow called 'The Cheeky 40'. My dad, George Adams born 1933 in Ingleston Street, mentioned that an uncle of his was a member of this gang. Unfortunately, my dad isn't around any more to ask more. Has anyone else heard of this gang???? It's possible that the uncle was called Willie.....but i don't know how far back my dad would be talking about.

George lived in Southampton for 40+ years & never once revisited Glasgow or even talked about it in any great depth, to me & my brothers.....we realised that it hadn't been the best of times.

If there's anyone who knows about this 'Cheeky 40', Ingleston St, the Adams' family or just about the area at that time, i would love to hear from you. (Also reference Everard Cruickshanks Adams/Mary Ann Stewart Jeppesen/Rankin Memorial Hospital/657 Edgefauld Road......)

Many thanks from Pauline 'newbie' Saunders nee Adams xx


Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GG
post 4th Oct 2009, 06:31am
Post #2


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
Hi Pauline,

Welcome to the boards! You may have seen the following reference to the 'Cheeky 40' on the boards here:

QUOTE
Hi All.. Yes the notorious area you are talking about was Barnes Road, Especially around the Sixties with the Gang culture, the "Possil Fleet "and "The Cheeky 40" used to have the odd Ding Dong with them, but eventually the Untouchables soon put a stop to them Cheers Flim

http://discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/index.ph...st&p=126095

I also found on the web a reference in The Times:

QUOTE
A gang called the “Cheeky 40” made a point of beating up French sailors in the local dance halls. The Glasgow Herald of December 22, 1942, reported an incident in which a seaman was stabbed after “various nationals went to the aid of their compatriots and it is believed there was a struggle for a knife”.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/s...ticle841288.ece

Also, someone else has looked for information on the gang here:

http://discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/Cheeky-Forty-t14840.html

The gang is (briefly?) mentioned in the following book

Blood on the Streets: The A-Z of Glasgow Crime (Paperback)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blood-Streets-Z-Gl...e/dp/1845020170

Pauline, the gang (from Garngad, now Royston) appears to be one of the more prominent of a large number of 'razor gangs' which blighted Glasgow in the thirties and forties; they are frequently mentioned in the context of their more notorious rivals The Tong and The Billy Boys.

There is also the suggestion that these gangs consisted of anarchists rather then 'neds'...

QUOTE
Sometime during the Spanish Revolution, probably about 1937, a Glaswegian who had gone to fight Franco, was arrested by the Stalinist authorities then in the process of crushing the revolution. This nameless individual, popularised by the play From the Calton to Catalonia by Willie Maley, had been ‘leader aff’ of the Cheeky Forty, a Garngad-based gang, and was arrested in Spain for ‘hooliganism’. Fighting the state for years on his own doorstep had obviously whetted this character’s appetite for a more large-scale engagement. One could easily claim generations of Glasgow criminal rebels against the status quo for the cause of anarchism, but then many anarchists might not agree with such an inclusion. Certainly, the crux of the matter is that Glasgow has had and continues to have a long and venerable history of revolt. Anarchism has found a central role, I would argue, in that development and has, moreover, always found a welcoming home in the tenements, factories, pubs, halls and back-rooms, as well as the hearts and minds of Glasgow people. But what is it?

http://radicalglasgow.me.uk/glasgowpedia/w...#39;s_Anarchism

GG.


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GG
post 4th Oct 2009, 06:40am
Post #3


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
Also, from the Daily Mail, the suggestion that the wartime leader of the Free French may have made a surprise visit to Scotland as a result of the actions of the Cheeky Forty:

QUOTE
The Great Deceit;
On Christmas Eve, 1942, an unexpected visit by French President de Gaulle caught Scotland on the hop. Was it a social call... or something more sinister? Daily Mail, December 24, 2005 Saturday

... Warships such as Surcouf, then the largest submarine in the world, operated from the Clyde, along with convoy escort frigates such as L'Escarmouche, La Decouverte and Lobelia.

French seamen in their distinctive uniforms and caps topped with red pom-poms were a familiar sight in Greenock, Gourock and Glasgow. Local men, home on leave from the forces, resented the ease with which they wooed girls.

A gang calling themselves the 'Cheeky 40' had taken to beating them up in dance halls.

The French fought back. In early December, 1942, police were called to a very nasty incident in which a young Frenchman was stabbed and several men were wounded in what the local paper described as 'a struggle for a knife'.

So was de Gaulle on an impromptu diplomatic mission to calm French tempers and soothe Scottish nerves?

That is possible. He made a point of thanking Greenock for its 'generosity and kindness'.

But, even in the strained atmosphere of wartime and amid the strict security necessary to protect senior allied leaders, there was astonishment at what the Scottish press referred to as the 'surprise nature of de Gaulle's visit'. ...

GG.


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paulines47
post 4th Oct 2009, 09:39am
Post #4


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 889
Joined: 3rd Oct 2009
From: Southampton, Hampshire
Member No.: 7,555
Thanks for the info GG.

I didn't realise that the 'cheeky 40' were as bad as that.....the name sort of implies a bunch of nippers just being naughty laugh.gif Having said that, my dad told us that they used to keep razor blades underneath the lapels of their jackets!!

I shall have a look at the links you've supplied, with great interest.

If there's anyone else with any stories or recollections, i'd love to hear from you.

Many thanks for the welcome.
Pauline ;]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
TeeHeeHee
post 4th Oct 2009, 11:32am
Post #5


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 14,249
Joined: 25th Jan 2009
From: German/French/Swiss border town on the River Rhein
Member No.: 6,448
Looks like the "Cheeky 40" might have been reference to location and number, viz-a viz; "Can yer mammy sew? Well get her to stitch that!"


--------------------
"Destiny is a good thing to accept when it's going your way. When it isn't, don't call it destiny; call it injustice, treachery, or simple bad luck.”
― Joseph Heller, God Knows
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
**paulines47**
post 4th Oct 2009, 02:19pm
Post #6






QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 4th Oct 2009, 12:37pm) *
Looks like the "Cheeky 40" might have been reference to location and number, viz-a viz; "Can yer mammy sew? Well get her to stitch that!"

Your quote made me smile.....i remember my dad saying this on quite a few occasions. Even at the age of 60 plus, as a VC at a working men's club, if there was ever any trouble everyone used to say "get Jock" & they'd leave my dad to it.

He was only about 5ft 8, but i'd seen him square up to some big guys....nobody would mess with him. I suppose the uncle's 'spirit' lived on through him.

One thing that always amazed me was that he'd lived in Southampton for about 40 years & never, ever lost his glaswegian accent....even i couldn't understand him sometimes.
biggrin.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paulines47
post 4th Oct 2009, 05:37pm
Post #7


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 889
Joined: 3rd Oct 2009
From: Southampton, Hampshire
Member No.: 7,555
QUOTE (TeeHeeHee @ 4th Oct 2009, 01:37pm) *
Looks like the "Cheeky 40" might have been reference to location and number, viz-a viz; "Can yer mammy sew? Well get her to stitch that!"

Hi TeeHeeHee, your quote made me smile.....i remember my dad saying this on quite a few occasions. He was a VC at a working men's club & whenever there was any trouble the other committee members used to get Jock to sort it out. He was only about 5ft 8 but i've seen him square up to some big guys....nobody ever messed with him. I suppose the uncle's nature lived on through my dad.

I'd still like to hear from anyone with recollections of early Glasgow & people.
Pauline ;]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
North Canalbank ...
post 6th Mar 2010, 04:28pm
Post #8

Visitor
***
Posts: 46
Joined: 11th Oct 2009
Member No.: 7,593
There have been at least a couple of books written about Glasgow gangs, yet none of them mention a gang from Anderston.
Even an ex speaker of the House of Commons said Anderston made the Gorbals look like Center Parks, yet never a mention of a gang.
Strange one, maybe the mists of time have wiped the Anderston folk memory clean.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paulines47
post 7th Mar 2010, 02:00pm
Post #9


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 889
Joined: 3rd Oct 2009
From: Southampton, Hampshire
Member No.: 7,555
QUOTE (North Canalbank St @ 6th Mar 2010, 04:26pm) *
There have been at least a couple of books written about Glasgow gangs, yet none of them mention a gang from Anderston.
Even an ex speaker of the House of Commons said Anderston made the Gorbals look like Center Parks, yet never a mention of a gang.
Strange one, maybe the mists of time have wiped the Anderston folk memory clean.


Apart from the info GG supplied at the start of this thread, i've found nothing. One of my relatives has just visited Glasgow & asked everyone.....but they (apparently) knew nothing. As you say, perhaps the mists of time have wiped memories clean.

I would've been interested to have found out who Uncle Willy was.....there are several in my tree & it could've been any of them.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
North Canalbank ...
post 7th Mar 2010, 09:59pm
Post #10

Visitor
***
Posts: 46
Joined: 11th Oct 2009
Member No.: 7,593
Hopefully P within the next couple of weeks i,ll get the chance to meet up with the only person i ever heard of mentioning the "Cheeky 40" thats still alive.

I,ll see if they remember any more info on this gang.

Certainly the local beat cop of the time period went by the nickname, "Hitler" and local folklore has it that Hitler was,nt adverse to asking the locals hoodies of the time to fight him, "man to man", in the open backcourts of the tenaments.
The name "Cheeky40" seems to have died around the time the area was redevloped in the late 50s early 60s.
The follow on gang name by the 1960s in the same area was the "Shamrock" as stated by a 1970s gang member in his book.

Often wondered if the gang names came from 1930/40/50s B movies, not as far fetched as its seems considering the number of gangs called Tongs, Toi, Posse, Gringo, Bison, Goucho and the marine theme as in Maryhill Fleet or Baltic Fleet.
And who thought up the Bee Hive name from the Gorbals, was the BH not the name of pub ?

There is a theory that gangland history points to Irish faction fights being brought into the 19th century industrial enviroment as to the reason Glasgow gangs existed in the first place.
Noticeable that in New York and Liverpool the gangs of old had the same names as their Glasgow counterparts.

I should point out for the victims sake in all of this, that there nothing romantic about razor gangs and such like.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paulines47
post 8th Mar 2010, 11:43am
Post #11


Super City Key Holder
******
Posts: 889
Joined: 3rd Oct 2009
From: Southampton, Hampshire
Member No.: 7,555
I'll be interested to hear if they have any recollections. My dad never really gave up any info & i suppose we never thought to ask him anything.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rabbie
post 8th Mar 2010, 05:33pm
Post #12


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 2,231
Joined: 24th Feb 2005
From: I keep my interests... mobile!
Member No.: 1,794
Naw, cannea say I have heard them (Cheecky 40) until reading this thread.

Cheeky could be a wee bit of wordplay on the ubiquitous warcry "Ah'm gonna rip yer jaw.", meaning gonna slash your face /cheeks.

Well ye ken wit Glasgea humour is like.

"Hey yoo, kin yer mammy sow?"

"Naw,", hoping to get away with it.

"Well, time she leant, init."

As a wean used to see running ding dongs, featuring the Shamrock, Tongs and Fleet, used to be blue mhudder on the Parade during green / orange walk season. Pub brawls and chibbings were common.


--------------------
Black holes are where God divided by zero.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jock
post 8th Mar 2010, 10:53pm
Post #13


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,369
Joined: 28th Jul 2003
From: Los Angeles, California
Member No.: 32
Ever heard of the "Sally Boys"..... from the Parkhead/Carntyne area many,many years ago. I had a classmate at St. Mungo's who belonged and taught us all their song which I still remember after 60 years!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*Willy Maley*
post 26th Apr 2010, 12:39pm
Post #14






Cheeky McCaig was from Townhead and was, as I understand it, the leader of the 'Cheeky Forty'. I was with my father years ago in Possil and he said hello to him. My father thought that Cheeky (whose name might have been Charlie) was also in Spain at the same time as him in the 1930s.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*George Gray*
post 5th Aug 2010, 12:10pm
Post #15






HI

Just read you query (a wee bit late but better than never). I come from Greenock where the Cheeky 40 were the local thugs during the war. At that time the british and allied fleets were anchored at the tail of the bank and the cheeky 40 used to get into serious fights with the visiting sailors, using razors and knives. At some point a guy called "Wolf Docherty" I'm not sure if he was a member, but he killed a sailor with an axe and that caused all kinds of trouble. Wolf finally got away with the murder as a stupid policeman cleaned the axe before it went to court for evidence and hence the case was lost. Docherty died a long time later, but he was a real pain as he used to brag about it all the time, when he had a few beers.

Hope this help fill a gap or two.

Regards

George Gray
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th Jul 2018

All material in the site Glasgow Guide is copyright of the Glasgow Guide Organisation. This material is for your own private use only, and no part of the site may be reproduced, amended, modified, copied, or transmitted to third parties, by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. All rights reserved.

Glasgow Hotels: book cheap hotels in Glasgow online now.