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  Replying to Glasgow: Worst Schools In Britain?
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Last 10 Posts [ In reverse order ]
Ossie Posted 29th Jan 2013, 05:05pm
 
QUOTE (Ossie @ 29th Jan 2013, 04:31pm) *
I'm in Easterhouse fairly regularly Heather. I have to agree with you , the vast majority of folk are terrific . They go about their lives in a fairly unobtrusive manner . Hence the fact that we tend only to notice those who seek attention for the wrong reasons.

Ossie.

Forgot to say, there are lots of new houses too . The place looks very smart.
Ossie Posted 29th Jan 2013, 04:14pm
 
QUOTE (Heather @ 29th Jan 2013, 04:20pm) *
Wee Davy, your right about Frankie Vaughan.

We lived in Easterhouse at that time and most of the so called weapons handed in were found lying about building sites, or made from scrap just so the few gangs that actually existed could get themselves on TV.
A lot of the Easterhouse people blamed Frankie for getting Easterhouse a bad name which at that time it did not deserve.

Nothing was ever said about the good teenagers who led by one of the Priests from St. Clare's, went round the scheme painting and decorating pensioners house. The pensioners provided the paper & paint, but the work was done for free.
Other's went away Hill Climbing or playing in the Football Teams Youth Club, winning many trophy's.

My husband and I were both Youth Leaders, so we knew many decent teenagers who out numbered the bad one's.

I don't know about now as we moved from Easterhouse about 40 years ago, but like most Housing Scheme's, it has more good people living there than bad one's.

I'm in Easterhouse fairly regularly Heather. I have to agree with you , the vast majority of folk are terrific . They go about their lives in a fairly unabtrusive manner . Hence the fact that we tend only to notice those who seek attention for the wrong reasons.

Ossie.
Heather Posted 29th Jan 2013, 04:03pm
  Wee Davy, your right about Frankie Vaughan.

We lived in Easterhouse at that time and most of the so called weapons handed in were found lying about building sites, or made from scrap just so the few gangs that actually existed could get themselves on TV.
A lot of the Easterhouse people blamed Frankie for getting Easterhouse a bad name which at that time it did not deserve.

Nothing was ever said about the good teenagers who led by one of the Priests from St. Clare's, went round the scheme painting and decorating pensioners house. The pensioners provided the paper & paint, but the work was done for free.
Other's went away Hill Climbing or playing in the Football Teams Youth Club, winning many trophy's.

My husband and I were both Youth Leaders, so we knew many decent teenagers who out numbered the bad one's.

I don't know about now as we moved from Easterhouse about 40 years ago, but like most Housing Scheme's, it has more good people living there than bad one's.
Ossie Posted 29th Jan 2013, 03:05pm
  Such an overwhelming sadness courses through me when reading the various comments on this thread . Not because I disagree with them, they are, for the most part, valid .

My own education, or lack of it , ( nobody's fault but my own ) instilled in me a determination to try as best as I could to make sure my two daughters achieved their full potential in life . I feel my wife and myself are entitled to a degree of contentment in this regard . Both my daughters went to Glasgow University , one is now a doctor , ( consultant) and the other active in public life.

However, for me there is another aspect to education, perhaps every bit as important as having the potential to sustain a level of financial stability . I've met many obviously intelligent folk who display a certain frustration which in some cases manifests itself in unacceptable behaviour .

Guess what I'm trying to say is that a decent level of education, at least should, lead to us being more contented in later life.

To get back on topic. It can't be the case that Glasgow kids lack something which kids from other areas possess . If it's true to say we're all the product of our environment, then perhaps therein lies the the answer to this very vexing problem.

Ossie.
Gemini Posted 29th Jan 2013, 01:36pm
  Isobel ref your post #222 I think you are referring to St Thomas's in Riddrie. I went to that school. Sister Loyola was in charge of the older students and sister Ignatius was in charge of the younger ones, and I would say as far I can remember all the teachers I had were really dedicated to teaching regardless of where you were from.
CAT Posted 29th Jan 2013, 01:17pm
 
QUOTE (Dexter St. Clair @ 23rd Jan 2013, 06:36pm) *
St Andrew's, in Carntyne, Glasgow, which serves some of the poorest postcodes in the UK, such as Easterhouse, Cranhill, Ruchazie and Shettleston, was awarded three "excellent" ratings by inspectors and two "very goods".

It also serves a couple of almost affluent areas as well but all children and staff should be congratulated.

All 3 of my children were educated at St Andrews and I can say the school has a very strong attitude to discipline and encouragement of the children to take responsibility for their education and achievements. They have a no nonsense approach whilst being encouraging and nurturing, helping pupils to attain the level of exams which is achievable for them giving each child a chance of success.

As with all schools there are good and bad teachers but the leadership at this school is very strong. They have always been strict on uniform and appearance giving the pupils pride in themselves no matter ability. The children all wear blazers shirts and ties at all times making sure the poorer children are not dressed any differently from their more affluent peers. Whilst clothes do not make anyone more intelligent, the uniform makes every one feel the same.
Doug1 Posted 29th Jan 2013, 12:48pm
  A good strong headmaster with a good team of enthusiastic teachers is the main key to a well motivated and successful school but without the backing and support of parents the job will be far more difficult. Good parents should help educating their kids from the earliest possible age and should continue monitoring and helping them throughout their schooling. Unfortunately nowadays there are a lot of parents, or guardians, who just couldn't care less ie workless parents often end up with workless children
wee davy Posted 29th Jan 2013, 12:35pm
  lol I still remember that front page picture wi Frankie Vaghan helping the 'gangs' put awe their 'chibs' swords and the like, intae a big refuse bin.
(Awe rigged up for the Record/Times of course).
THAT wiz the Easterhoose ah recall.
bilbo.s Posted 29th Jan 2013, 12:31pm
  Absolutely agree, Heather. I often worry about the correct translation of " in loco parentis". rolleyes.gif
Heather Posted 29th Jan 2013, 11:48am
  It's true that there is little respect for Teachers nowadays.
Just a few days ago I was telling my two g'daughters how strict Teachers were in my day, and we even got lines if we went to School not wearing our School uniform.

If my mum had heard that I was cheeky to a Teacher I would have got a cuff on the ear.
I know some Teachers in my day were really hard on children and I had one who should never have been allowed in a classroom, she was a monster Teaching in the Infant School.

My son' Primary Education was in Easterhouse and it never stopped him from going on to University as did many of his generation whose Primary and Secondary Education was in Easterhouse.
I know two girls born, bred and Educated in Easterhouse who are University Professors. Many more who became Teachers, Nurse's Accountants etc. So it's not always the Teachers to blame, some parents never bothered to teach their children respect.

Discipline should begin in the home, not the School.

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