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  Replying to Pots And Pans Hen Night
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Last 10 Posts [ In reverse order ]
ExPOW Posted 5th Mar 2018, 12:10am
  One night walking to my aunt's house in Balornock, I happened to be accosted by some pot-banging
young women dragging some hapless about-to-married friend around looking for a possible suspect.

Crossing the street (heading eastwards on Broomfield Road Springburn) some fifty yards ahead of
them as they approached, I saw that they had spotted me, a callow youth, allbut eighteen years old.

It was obvious, I was an intended target as they made a beeline straight to me allthewhile increasing their
"Kick the can" chant rising towards fever pitch.
Not quite at the intersection of Broomfield and Drumbottie (how apt?) Road we collided and where it was
announced that some serious lip-locking was required immediately.

And so we did.
The lady in question may have been a little under "the influence" but it became apparent the some of her other
senses quickly woke up. She was quite responsive if not to say entheusiastic.

After what seemed about seven or so minutes she disengaged gasping and was duly lead away.
Half a minute later two of her pals caught up with me stating that they wanted some of what she had
just had.
(women talk)

Oh well.....

Noblesse Oblige.
*TAM* Posted 4th Mar 2018, 07:28pm
  It was called a "Bottling" in Dumbarton in the 50s 60s & 70s early 80s then Hen Night took over .

Girl wid go roon wi pots & pans banging them singing, "Hard Up,Hard Up Hard Up Tin Can Sharon Bakers got a man" . Etc etc or whit ever the lassies name wiz . smile.gif
magaret Posted 11th Sep 2017, 01:38pm
  this was called hard up kit the can when i was younger...
Billy Boil Posted 5th Jun 2015, 10:25am
 
QUOTE (Guest @ 26th Aug 2012, 02:17am) *
This was a common practise in among the "Mill Lassies" of Paisley and surrounding districts to dress up and with their friends, bridesmaids and wedding guests, go out on the "bevvy" and dance through the streets decorated and stoshious. Males were cornered and expected to contribute cash to the "chanty" carried by the future bride. As this was normaly on a Friday night they did quite well. After making a contribution you got to kiss the bride, and as I recall in one particular occasion I got to kiss most of the wedding party. A grand old Scottish custom I was more that happy to participate in.

I remember the 'Mill Lassies" and their round the streets wedding ritual and all the kisses I could get after the pubs shut.
Great times and good fun. Danny Kyle wrote a song about them.
Tally Rand Posted 28th May 2015, 01:42am
 
QUOTE (nippynell @ 2nd Nov 2010, 09:53pm) *
I think it was called " A Shirraking " Not really too sure, but that name rings a bell, it would be good to find out. biggrin.gif

Described in full in the novel " No Mean City" where "Razor King" gets a sherriking from a long time girl friend he has dumped for some
other woman.
petunia Posted 26th May 2015, 01:11pm
  Another song I remember was "Down in yonder meadow where the green grass grows"
Guest Posted 26th May 2015, 10:21am
  A Shirrakin was a public argument usually done by the Women to the man a public. Riddiculing if you like when the man got caught out or spent his wages . It would also happen to women who whent with married men.

My Nana told me all this born in 1906 Govan lived until 1999 in Pollok.

Most of this came from Gossip doon the Steamie.

God Bless Her.
mlconnelly Posted 26th Aug 2012, 10:15am
  I haven't seen a hen night like that in years, remember the song "hands up kick the can". Mary laugh.gif laugh.gif
Melody Posted 26th Aug 2012, 08:16am
  We still see them occasionally here and they always make me smile. smile.gif

I remember having a bouquet made of weeds and a baby's potty with salt in it, passing men and boys who seemed to have been forced to put money in it . laugh.gif Some of the men ran away ( well they did have to kiss the bride laugh.gif)

Although I remember dreading it all it was great fun and everybody was lovely. Mind ye I was shocked when I saw the state of my granny's pots after all that bashing of them. Great fun and a lovely memory really. None of the really crazy limos and stuff they seem to have today though.
Guest Posted 26th Aug 2012, 02:09am
  This was a common practise in among the "Mill Lassies" of Paisley and surrounding districts to dress up and with their friends, bridesmaids and wedding guests, go out on the "bevvy" and dance through the streets decorated and stoshious. Males were cornered and expected to contribute cash to the "chanty" carried by the future bride. As this was normaly on a Friday night they did quite well. After making a contribution you got to kiss the bride, and as I recall in one particular occasion I got to kiss most of the wedding party. A grand old Scottish custom I was more that happy to participate in.
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