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> Springburn Virtual Museum, Images & info galore
thebardau
post 13th Aug 2003, 10:59am
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Recently I asked on these boards what's happened to the Virtual Mitchell Library.

It's still down or disappeared. But I found another similar, though much smaller site. It features images & info about old Glasgow, concentrating on the Springburn area, some dating back to the mid-1800's, & some are of times that quite a few members here will remember, or at least have heard about. I'm quite excited about this site - do check out the wonderful image of Mrs. Thomas in her kitchen -
"Mrs Jeannie Thomas was the mother of Springburn's famous author and historian John Thomas. The kitchen range, or cast-iron stove seen here, was typical of cooking and heating facilities in tenement houses. Cooking, eating and sleeping, together with other routine daily activities were generally done within the kitchen. Ranges required a great deal of work to maintain them, and household pride demanded that cleaning and polishing with blacklead" [ & there's more on tenement life included with this one]

or check the 1975 clearance of Springburn tenements, or the interior of a 1930's "drysalter" shop. I've only started mining this site, it's wonderful. & I don't even come from Springburn. It would be great if there are any personal memories or stories here that members could share with the rest of us. Do yourself a favour & check it out soon - in case it goes the way of the Virtual Mitchell - & share with us your memories. Here's the link to it -

http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/springburn/spindex.html
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Kayleigh
post 13th Aug 2003, 12:55pm
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cool.gif Hi thebardau, aye ah found this site as well, it brings back a lot o memories when ah wis a wee bairn. Kay st swimming baths, we all went there as kids not only for swimming, but we goat oor weekly bath there, an when we came oot we goat a roll an fritters fae the chippie, (if ma stepmaw hud enuff money). Me an ma wee sister were christened in Johnstone church in Springburn. We stayed in a single-end tenement on the Northcroft rd in Springburn, tap flair, ma mammy hud tae take her turn in washing and whiteing the stairs, she used tae black lead the firerange every month, an there wis only wan wee ootside toilet fur three faimilies that lived oan the landing, it wis cauld in the night, an wee squares o newspaper fur yer bum nae fancy tissue. Ah remember when ah wis five years old an me an the wee boy next door, (Douglas Paterson), crossed the big Springburn road tae get tae the big american swings, an oor neighbur seen us an telt ma da, ma bum wis red raw wi the skelping that ah goat fur crossing that road. Oanyway the bardau ah could go oan endlessly boring youse, thanks fur takin me doon memory lane. wub.gif
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thebardau
post 13th Aug 2003, 01:13pm
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What you call "boring" is like music to a long-time ex-pat's ears, believe me. I went to Springburn only once - taken on a visit to a rello's single-end. Some of those images brought back memories to me - like the wash-house in a Springburn back court. From what I see on this site, Springburn must have been like a village community.
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Melody
post 13th Aug 2003, 02:03pm
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Ed. I've just spent a wonderful hour on that site, the images are just fabulous, still never did the ironing!!
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thebardau
post 13th Aug 2003, 02:16pm
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Aren't they great! And the one of the locomotive being hauled on to a ship at, was it Finnieston Docks - and the Irish goatherds in Springburn long time ago? I think this site's a must-see for anyone from Springburn. Virtual Mitchell was much bigger than this, many more images - but this site will keep me happy for a while, melody.

This post has been edited by thebardau: 13th Aug 2003, 02:19pm
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Melody
post 13th Aug 2003, 02:46pm
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Me too Ed rolleyes.gif nobody will get a sensible word out of me for a while now, not that they do usually. It really is amazing, takes you to world long gone now, I remember Springburn in the mid fifties and it really was a bustling community. Pease Brose and Pianos, was an expression used to descibe Springburn. Not sure what it meant really, something akin to Poor but Houseproud, no doubt somebody will correct me! rolleyes.gif Brilliant a real walk down memory lane, what did you think of the tank in Springburn Rd with all the people clambering to see.
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thebardau
post 13th Aug 2003, 03:29pm
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I hadn't looked at that one until now, & it's pretty amazing. I hope there's somebody who knew or knows of Hoey's store on Springburn Rd, it must have been HUGE!
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GG
post 13th Aug 2003, 04:49pm
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The 'Real' Springburn museum, unfortunately closed its doors a couple of years ago after the Scottish Executive refused to grant a paltry sum to fund its continued existence.

Here's how the museum described itself:

QUOTE
Springburn Museum is a voluntary, non-profit making organisation dedicated to ensuring that the rich history of the local community lives on for future generations to experience and enjoy. Membership application.

Springburn, in the north-east of Glasgow, was once the greatest centre of railway manufacturing in the world. It had four great railway works - Cowlairs, St Rollox, Hyde Park and Atlas Works. Between 1840 and 1900, Springburn grew from a tiny village to a thriving industrial suburb of 30,000 people. At their peak the works employed more than 9,000 men building and repairing steam engines, carriages and wagons. The story of this typical 19th century industrial community reflects the changes in the city as a whole.

Springburn Museum is Glasgow's first independent community museum. It preserves the history of an area which was once the greatest centre of railway manufacturing in the world. The story of the rise, decline and rebirth of this unique Glaswegian industrial community is told through photographs and models, objects and graphics - and, most importantly, through the memories of its local people.

The exhibitions and events reflect all aspects of the life of the community in the past and present, including home life in tenements and tower blocks, steam locomotive technology and labour history, the Co-operative society and modern youth clubs all find a place in the displays. The exhibitions are frequently changed and updated, continually adding material donated by local residents, so there is always something new and interesting to discover at Springburn Museum.

Help Support a truly unique museum:

By donating objects or photographs relating to the everyday life of people in Springburn, past and present.
By becoming a member of Springburn Museum Trust. Membership is open to everyone.

As well as helping ensure the continued success of the museum, members will receive a free quarterly newsletter and special invitations to private viewings and events.


You can see some photos of the final, sad day of the Springburn Museum here:

http://www.glasgowguide.co.uk/images_sprin...urn_museum.html


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Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
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Melody
post 13th Aug 2003, 05:55pm
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The closure of that museum was a total tragedy, pity for the wonderful folk who were desperately trying to support it and keep it going to no avail. I was there a couple of times and it absolutely captured the atmosphere of Springburn.
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marlene
post 13th Aug 2003, 08:51pm
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I was born in Springburn in 1948, in a wee single-end in Kemp St. We moved to Barmulloch in 1952 to a 3 bedroom house, with a bathroom, oh the luxury of it. Moved back to Springburn (Petershill Road) Left there to move down to Sussex and have been here nearly 30 years. Went back for a visit a couple of years ago, and would you believe it, I got lost in Springburn. It's changed so much, does anyone remember Lizzie McFarlane's wee shop that sold everything?
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thebardau
post 14th Aug 2003, 03:01am
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That's truly a sad story about the closing of the Springburn Museum, GG. How petty-minded of the Scottish Executive for refusing to grant a small sum for its survival. Glasgow's "first independent community museum" must have been a wonderful piece of work in its own right & a real credit to the community that birthed it. How sad that its worth was not recognised. Sorry, but I really believe that a Gov't that does not cherish the past [of its people] shows too little foresight for the future.

Now I'm really feeling pessimistic as to whether the Virtual Mitchell will ever re-emerge, & I don't feel too optimistic about the continuing existence of the Springburn Virtual Museum either now. Please, GGBB members, check out this great tribute to Springburn's lively history - while you still can.
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scotslad90
post 14th Aug 2003, 09:59pm
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I was an occassional visitor to Springburn in the late 60's early 70's and remember some of the places that are mentioned in this fantastic site.
I remember a Hoey's from that time right on Springburn Road but it was a pretty classy furniture shop if I remember correctly.The Hoey's shown on site with all the Granpa style bunnets outside looks fantastic and I wonder if it was part of a chain of stores because until just last year there was one in Partick and it sold school uniforms and older fashioned clothes and was something of a landmark shop.
In the newly redeveloped Springburn of today I am lost just cannot figure out where the old Springburn Rd landmarks were.
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thebardau
post 15th Aug 2003, 02:30am
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The Hoey's store shown in the Virtual Museum looked a fascinating place - & I loved the explanation of the men's bunnets being at the store entrance to shield male buyers from the usual "shopping experience" - some attitudes never change! The fact that this same store grew into an emporium with 36 windows is in itself a testimony to the rapid development of this once bustling area. Kayleigh recalls how soundly she was skelped as a young child for crossing the very busy Springburn Rd in the 1950's.

scotslad90 admits to being lost in today's Springburn, and even more telling is a similar experience happening to marlene, a former long-time resident of this area. It's a pity there aren't any other former Springburn residents on these boards as it would be interesting to know if they've had similar experiences. Also, while I'm sure that many areas in the "old" Glasgow had a sense of community, this feeling of being part of a community seems to have been particularly strong in Springburn.

But no matter which part you hailed from, the images on this site will bring back memories of the Glasgow you & your parents were once part of, so I hope you check it out soon - while the site still exists.

This post has been edited by thebardau: 15th Aug 2003, 02:31am
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Springburnlass
post 9th Apr 2005, 11:45pm
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Hi everyone,
It`s taken me a while to find this thread. I was born in Auchinloch stret in 1963, I lived there until 1976, it was demolished shortly afterwards. I only remember Hoey`s as selling clothes. All folded up neatly in wee wooden drawers in glass display cabinets. I don`t remember it selling furniture. I went to Hydepark Primary School, I loved it & was heart-broken at leaving. I`m pleased to se the old building still standing today.
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flims
post 10th Apr 2005, 10:29am
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Hi All here is a photo of Hydepark School i think Cheers Flim
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