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Glasgow Boards/Forums _ Glasgow News Blog _ Glaswegians To Get Mickey Mouse Lessons

Posted by: GG 3rd Jun 2012, 08:51pm

Up to 10,000 Glaswegians are to be sent to charm school in preparation for the Commonwealth Games in 2014. The move comes after Edinburgh-based quango bosses decided that the famous Glaswegian welcoming spirit was not good enough for receiving visitors to the city during the 2014 Games.

Glaswegians attending the one-day training event will – according to city bosses – be taught how to speak properly, be instructed how to stand in the right position when providing service, and become skilled in techniques to maintain eye contact while talking.

The 'Glasgow Welcomes' class, a joint project between VisitScotland and city tourism chiefs, is based on the principles created by the Walt Disney Company, including treating customers and tourists in a manner more associated with showbusiness.

Among other techniques trainees will learn over the next two years, is how to accept compliments gracefully, how to remember people's names, and how to offer tips about local tourist hotspots.

The 25 course will also include a quiz about Glasgow, requirements that attendees make personal pledges on how they can improve their future behaviour, and all staff will be told to use the American-style cheery "enjoy the rest of your day" sign-off.

The head of people development at Cordia said of the propgramme:

QUOTE
"It's about putting the customer first, listening to what they're saying and giving information that will help them."

However, not everyone is quite so impressed! Glasgow-based comedian Greg Hemphill, one half of TV duo Chewin' The Fat, said:
QUOTE
"I'm sure their initiative is well intentioned but I do think Glaswegians have a natural charm and if you polish off those edges too much you’re left with somebody from Edinburgh."

Glasgow comedian Janey Godley said:
QUOTE
"I was in the service industry for 15 years in a bar and I knew how to talk to people. Glaswegians are basically very chatty, straight-up people. We don’t need to be taught how to shake hands and make eye contact."



GG.

Posted by: droschke7 3rd Jun 2012, 09:54pm

Personally i think it's a damned cheek to tar all Glaswegians with the same brush, there are so many different accents in Glasgow, some less understandable than others, but most people in the "Service Industry" speak a perfectly understandable English while at work(some using their telephone voice/ accent). I notice that the idea came from Edinburgh. Typical of the old animosity, last time I was in Edinburgh I had problems understanding them, and I'm ex forces I've traveled all over and hardly have a Glasgow accent at all.

Posted by: *Peter Harte* 3rd Jun 2012, 10:02pm

I have been in canada coming up for fifty years I haven`t lost my accent and anytime I speak to strangers they always say I love your accent.

I still I still call myself a Govanite born and bred so we dont need any schooling to posh us up :d

Posted by: *Old Sailor* 3rd Jun 2012, 10:43pm

This has nothing to do with accent! Accents are tolerable in all countries when the provider's usage of language goes beyond two syllables and the conjugation of the verb is placed properly. The language that is predominant in the typical Glaswegian is a guttural comedic drone and is not pleasant to listeners.

Posted by: *jazzsaxman* 3rd Jun 2012, 10:49pm

Typical political bullshit. Next they will be telling us we are ruled by pompous twit in London

Posted by: *jazzsaxman* 3rd Jun 2012, 11:00pm

I also think that people in general could do with a bit of guidance on how to speak to and interact with their fellow human beings. People these days are just to busy with their own lives to have a care for anyone else. Some people can't even say thank you when you hold the door open for them. What happened to the milk of human kindness?

Posted by: weenorman 3rd Jun 2012, 11:48pm

complete and utter rubbish ,as stated before political trype , after the union of parliaments in 1707 the slow dismantling of all things scottish including language and dialects was played down and completely destroyed . in school we where told to speak properly and given the belt for speaking in our own broad scots tung ,there is legal documents written in broad scots in the glasgow history archives before. as far as im concerened broad scots is the langauge of glasgow

Posted by: eidas 4th Jun 2012, 12:34am

I'm thoroughly enjoying the majority of the comments on this subject. I've been gone from Scotland for 41 years and was considering my next trip back there to be during the Commonwealth games, but if I have to listen to some Americanised voice tell me to 'enjoy the rest of my day', I'm thinking I might go to America where I'm more likely to find a Glaswegian voice tell me 'huv a guid time while yer here hen'. As for a correct stance and eye contact, I learned these from my mammy in the 50's!

Posted by: droschke7 4th Jun 2012, 01:42am

QUOTE (*Old Sailor* @ 4th Jun 2012, 12:58am) *
This has nothing to do with accent! Accents are tolerable in all countries when the provider's usage of language goes beyond two syllables and the conjugation of the verb is placed properly. The language that is predominant in the typical Glaswegian is a guttural comedic drone and is not pleasant to listeners.

I beg to differ the Glaswegians you are describing are a very small minority who weren't brought up but dragged up by the scruffs of their necks.

Posted by: Agnes McManus 4th Jun 2012, 01:57am

I wonder how many people from Edinburhgh are going on this course. I come from Glasgow but when in Edinburgh I find I really have to listen, and sometimes have to ask the locals to repeat what they have said. I think they speak faster than us.

Posted by: Guest 4th Jun 2012, 05:30am

How cin thae visitors no' speak the Jelly Bean's Inglische, like wot we do

Nothing like a friendly Galswegian oan a call centre: "Whit dae ye'se waant?

Posted by: LizzieLou 4th Jun 2012, 07:23am

Lessons are a piece of nonsense, waste of time and badly needed resources should be used for other things. Our Scottish culture and accent are unique, people come from near and far to experience our hospitality. We don't need it to be eroded away by any "Good Ideas" from the overpaid hierarchy in Edinburgh or anywhare else!

Posted by: chas1937 4th Jun 2012, 07:27am

All I can add is that there are lot of Glaswegians who come on TV being interviewed and I cringe whenI hear them open their mouth.99.99% are fine but just that few that are a disgrace the way they speak and no I'm not a high falluting snob but just an ordinary guy of 75 who was born and bred here.I worked in yards,cleansing and also photograher so have always been in contact with all class of people.The ones that annoy me most are those with balls in their mouths and not a penny in their pockets

Posted by: Doug1 4th Jun 2012, 07:53am

QUOTE (weenorman @ 4th Jun 2012, 01:03am) *
complete and utter rubbish ,as stated before political trype , after the union of parliaments in 1707 the slow dismantling of all things scottish including language and dialects was played down and completely destroyed . in school we where told to speak properly and given the belt for speaking in our own broad scots tung ,there is legal documents written in broad scots in the glasgow history archives before. as far as im concerened broad scots is the langauge of glasgow

I'm not to sure what kind of school you went to to be belted for not speaking properly. I was brought up in Govan and spoke with a pretty normal glasgow accent but some of my classmates did speak with a stronger accent than me but i never heard of anyone being belted for that. However some english (english subject) teachers were quite strict about pupils being able to converse competently and clearly. You also say that broad scots is the language of glasgow. I would completely disagree with that. Glasgow is a melting pot of various accents ranging from the traditional heid, hame, and oot the noo variety up to very refined accents. I'm also not to sure about your premise about everything being dismantled after 1707. I seem to recall from my schooldays that this period of our history was one of great exploration and learning

PS welcome to GG
___________________

Posted by: JAGZ1876 4th Jun 2012, 08:05am

Just another easy money making scheme, they did a similar course for taxi drivers some years back, 45 for a day course in dealing with the public, a part of our job that most of us had mastered decades before.

Mickey mouse lessons.........Glaswegians should tell them to go and take a good Donald Duck to themselves.

Posted by: Guest 4th Jun 2012, 08:08am

I think it's a great idea. Glasgow and Scotland want to become international players? They need to raise their game and it does come right down to the small details like how to be gracious. Glaswegians on the whole have a pleasant, jovial approach - but it only works if you understand it. What people need to grab hold of is that the world is a much bigger place and many people wouldn't understand the Glasgow way... Example, I was in Buchanan Street Bus Station with a friend going to Glasgow Airport. She said to the guy at the information desk, "Excuse me, can you tell me where to get a bus to the airport?" He responds smugly, and it was definitely smug, "Which airport?" The Glasgow way is out of date and often completely inappropriate, and I feel during the Commonwealth Games, we need to make sure we are not embarrassed by ourselves and our lack of ability in the simplest areas, like social grace.

Posted by: irrie 4th Jun 2012, 08:11am

Good one Jagz and very true also. [ Thats my posh voice.]

Posted by: Doug1 4th Jun 2012, 08:12am

QUOTE (droschke7 @ 4th Jun 2012, 02:57am) *
I beg to differ the Glaswegians you are describing are a very small minority who weren't brought up but dragged up by the scruffs of their necks.

Well said droschke7 thumbup.gif

Posted by: Dave Grieve 4th Jun 2012, 08:14am

The only problem with Glesga folks way of talking is that they tend to cut corners when speaking for instance you often hear them when they come out here going into a shop and asking for a bottle of Wa-ur instead of Water the T sound is swallowed during the pronunciation,or they will ask for a loaf of Breid instead of Bread for instance I was in a queue in a shop once when a Scots woman told a Greek shop keeper "she waantid some Breid" at least a half Dozen times before I eventually told him what she was after.

I was guilty myself when I first came here talking about someone called Pee-ur until the local I was talking to asked what this word Pee-ur meant.

That brought it home to me that I had to slow down and pronounce the words properly.
Its still a Scots accent although not the hard Glesga accent anymore,in fact sometimes i'm asked if i'm Irish wink.gif

Posted by: norrie123 4th Jun 2012, 08:19am

I think we all can talk the talk but know when to slow it down for visitors to Glasgow
I was on a cruise a few weeks ago and more that one passenger commented on liking our accents
Mind you I did say to them when my friends were talking among themselves, can you follow the conversation biggrin.gif

I was brought up in Springburn/ Milton so I dont have a pan loaf accent

by the way, who pays for the course?
Bye for now, Norrie

Posted by: Guest 4th Jun 2012, 08:32am

QUOTE (droschke7 @ 4th Jun 2012, 02:57am) *
I beg to differ the Glaswegians you are describing are a very small minority who weren't brought up but dragged up by the scruffs of their necks.

Is it a small minority? I think you're right that it's a minority, but in my opinion, it's not a small one. It's a significant minority. I'd even go further and say it's a small majority...

Posted by: eve lopez 4th Jun 2012, 10:14am

l have lived in spain for the last 26 years and l have still got my glasgow accsent and very proud of it we glasweigen dont ask other to change theirs so why insult us we are what we are and proud l wouldnt wish to be from any were else

thumbup.gif

Posted by: Albanach 4th Jun 2012, 10:16am

As a Weegie living abroad (ie. in London), hearing the Glasgow accent is the friendliest, warmest, most welcoming experience I can imagine, short of stepping off the train at Central Station. I have no animosity towards Edinburghers, but they should keep their 'pan loaf' accent to themselves. Visitors to Glasgow expect to hear people in Glasgow speak with the local accent and use the local patter. Its probably one of the reasons they visit. The Edinburgh company should catch up. Not even the BBC speaks BBC English any more!

Posted by: JAGZ1876 4th Jun 2012, 11:18am

QUOTE (Guest @ 4th Jun 2012, 09:23am) *
Example, I was in Buchanan Street Bus Station with a friend going to Glasgow Airport. She said to the guy at the information desk, "Excuse me, can you tell me where to get a bus to the airport?" He responds smugly, and it was definitely smug, "Which airport?"

The guy in the information desk was correct when he replied "which airport?", as a cab driver i ask the same question as tourists will refer to Glasgow Prestwick airport as simply "the airport", they also look confused when they ask to be taken to the train station and i ask them "which station?"

Posted by: mlconnelly 4th Jun 2012, 11:41am

Im with you Jagz. I don't understand why the Guest thought it was smug to ask "which airport". For all he knew the person could have been going to Edinburgh never mind Glasgow or Prestwich airports. Having worked in a called centre, I must say I've had to listen to worse accents than ours, the 2 trickiest were the Brummy and Newcastle accents. Its insulting to Glaswegians to suggest that we don't know how to speak to people visiting our city. I visit Liverpool regularly and for the most part have no problem understanding or being understood but there are couple of people who I've met there that might as well be speaking Swahili and I think thats true of every town or city. Mary

Posted by: The Callands Rebel 4th Jun 2012, 12:12pm

Good day Fellow Readers,

Aren't we all a bit tired of the PC'ers of this planet?

Those proposing the class for the service industry must be akin to those damn Yankees in the United States who think they have the corner on
"American lingo".

I, personally, am married to a Glasgow Lass and love their brogue.

Tell those potty flushers to jump into the Clyde, No Wait,you wouldn't
want to pollute the Clyde.

Stay as you are Glasgow.

Jerry
Virginia

Posted by: aussiejimmy 4th Jun 2012, 12:23pm

People who come from abroad have heard about the style and ways of life that is Glasgow and look forward to the unique experience that they have been told about . Granted they may struggle slightly to understand the lingo initially, but it is part of the fun of being here. Glaswegians like it or not by you who are not from here, have an inbuilt knack of engendering warmth and hospitality to visitors, I hear this all the time in my travels, and for "Quango" in (their) wisdom who think Glasgow should be retrained in the art of hospitality dont bother, its a natural successful art form we have that not many can emulate and if visitors to the Commonwealth Games dont get the real welcome they will not return

Posted by: droschke7 4th Jun 2012, 12:46pm

QUOTE (Doug1 @ 4th Jun 2012, 10:08am) *
I'm not to sure what kind of school you went to to be belted for not speaking properly. I was brought up in Govan and spoke with a pretty normal glasgow accent but some of my classmates did speak with a stronger accent than me but i never heard of anyone being belted for that. However some english (english subject) teachers were quite strict about pupils being able to converse competently and clearly. You also say that broad scots is the language of glasgow. I would completely disagree with that. Glasgow is a melting pot of various accents ranging from the traditional heid, hame, and oot the noo variety up to very refined accents. I'm also not to sure about your premise about everything being dismantled after 1707. I seem to recall from my schooldays that this period of our history was one of great exploration and learning

PS welcome to GG
___________________

Not sure how old you are but most of us over 50 can remember the belt, I had it worse I went to a Military boarding school in Dunblane (secondary school) they had the belt the can the slipper drill time & cleansing duties. (Queen Victoria School Dunblane)

Posted by: rikkiduncan 4th Jun 2012, 01:00pm

QUOTE (chas1937 @ 4th Jun 2012, 08:42am) *
All I can add is that there are lot of Glaswegians who come on TV being interviewed and I cringe whenI hear them open their mouth.99.99% are fine but just that few that are a disgrace the way they speak and no I'm not a high falluting snob but just an ordinary guy of 75 who was born and bred here.I worked in yards,cleansing and also photograher so have always been in contact with all class of people.The ones that annoy me most are those with balls in their mouths and not a penny in their pockets

You have a problem with .01 percent of Glaswegians, get a grip and get a life.

Posted by: frame 4th Jun 2012, 01:45pm

It's been a while since I thought about the belt, for some of us it was almost a culture.
Not paying attention, not doing homework, getting caught with a comic on the knee, missing the bell, (on a frosty morning that could be bad).
You would approach this guy slowly,fearing the worst. All of a sudden his hand vanished inside his jacket. Was it a hanky, was it gun, nope, worse, it was a large thick three tailed demon that lived wrapped around his shoulder, and he was fast. Afterwards you would blow into those very sore cupped hands like some idiot trying to do bird calls.
How could any of us ever forget that Belt. Although, having said all of that, I never once remember getting it for my, then, very thick Glasgow accent.
I've lost that accent now, and there isn't a day that I don't regret that I have.
The remedy of course, is to come home to Glasgow and live for a few years, wouldn't take long before I was speaking like a true Glaswegian.
(nice thought).

Posted by: farci 4th Jun 2012, 02:01pm

QUOTE (*Old Sailor* @ 4th Jun 2012, 12:58am) *
This has nothing to do with accent! Accents are tolerable in all countries when the provider's usage of language goes beyond two syllables and the conjugation of the verb is placed properly. The language that is predominant in the typical Glaswegian is a guttural comedic drone and is not pleasant to listeners.

Old Sailor has got it right. The announcement about customer service training is a godsend to those who indulge in the 'we wuz robbed' widespread wingeing amongst Glaswegians and other big city Scots. I'm sure there would be a similar outcry in Liverpool or Newcastle.

The fact is that many of us are not good at eye contact, listening etc and low on self-esteem. It's all very well for Janey Godley and other luvvies whose careers are built on their ability to project themselves to pooh-pooh this idea but if it opens the door for the rest of us to communicate mor effectively - where's the harm?

Posted by: rumcdonald 4th Jun 2012, 02:55pm

I see the funny side of this. It's not a bad idea, and some people might need it more than others..ha ha. I must admit I don't like when people "write" with a broad Glasgow accent. Even I can't make out what they mean sometimes, and I'm FROM Glasgow.

Posted by: Isobel 4th Jun 2012, 02:59pm

I was raised in a housing scheme (Ruchazie) All our neighbours were working class folks like our selves.We had a Glasgow accent ,however it did not include,breed,naw,canny,waz, hoose ,I think you get the picture.

Last visit home I was blown away with the slang I was hearing in the city. Its sad really because Glasgow folks are friendly folks ,but many of the young ones have been brought up listing to all this slang and don't know any better.

Perhaps a few lessons at the primary level in school would help.Maybe a refresher at high school.You can have a nice Glasgow accent and still speak proper English.

Posted by: angel 4th Jun 2012, 03:17pm

Hi Isobel , when I recently spent that very pleasant afternoon with Anne1 and Heather in glasgow , I understood every word that they said , laugh.gif laugh.gif

Posted by: rumcdonald 4th Jun 2012, 03:23pm

QUOTE (Isobel @ 4th Jun 2012, 11:14am) *
I was raised in a housing scheme (Ruchazie) All our neighbours were working class folks like our selves.We had a Glasgow accent ,however it did not include,breed,naw,canny,waz, hoose ,I think you get the picture.

Last visit home I was blown away with the slang I was hearing in the city. Its sad really because Glasgow folks are friendly folks ,but many of the young ones have been brought up listing to all this slang and don't know any better.

Perhaps a few lessons at the primary level in school would help.Maybe a refresher at high school.You can have a nice Glasgow accent and still speak proper English.

Well said Isobel.

Posted by: rumcdonald 4th Jun 2012, 03:39pm

I live in Canada now but when I was in a Glasgow park a few years ago, a little Indian girl dressed in a sari, who was catching minnows in a jar, came over to me, and with a very broad Glasgow accent said "Dae ye waaant tae see ma fish Misses?" It was quite endearing, because she looked like a tiny Indian princess. We still laugh at this today. I go home to Glasgow often because I will always love the place.

Posted by: cowcaddens kid 4th Jun 2012, 03:44pm

Its a liberty telling the former european city of culture / Garden festival city that it needs lessons in more picturesque speech.
the though that this smart idea came from Embra the city of" ken this ken that and ken the next thing "makes this Weggie laugh.
I worked out of Edinburgh for 20 years and have had long term exposure to their dialect and attitude.
Ps remember Billy Connolly and his stint about americans "have a nice day " "you have a beautiful home here" culture
smacks of that
welcome to Skatland . Hope you have a nice day------away and biell yer heid pal. and to quote a certain royal princess Sod off and give us some peace.

rant over.

Posted by: Doug1 4th Jun 2012, 03:54pm

QUOTE (droschke7 @ 4th Jun 2012, 02:01pm) *
Not sure how old you are but most of us over 50 can remember the belt, I had it worse I went to a Military boarding school in Dunblane (secondary school) they had the belt the can the slipper drill time & cleansing duties. (Queen Victoria School Dunblane)

Thats not what I said D7. I said I had never heard of anyone being belted for "speaking in broad scots" Last week i posted a lengthy response to my experiences of getting strapped on a cold wintry morning by a sadistic bully of a teacher. I attended a pretty rough glasgow school where being belted was a regular daily event.
Thanks for responding though

Posted by: benny 4th Jun 2012, 04:35pm

QUOTE (Isobel @ 4th Jun 2012, 05:14pm) *
I was raised in a housing scheme (Ruchazie) All our neighbours were working class folks like our selves.We had a Glasgow accent ,however it did not include,breed,naw,canny,waz, hoose ,I think you get the picture. . . . .

I too lived in Ruchazie as a wean, and my speech certainly did include words like breid, naw, canny, hoose, etc. - just like the speech of the other children I played with.
I wish people - and Glaswegians in particular - would lose this idea that such speech is "slang", or a mark of social or intellectual inferiority. It is nothing of the kind, but just another form of regional differences - and long may they continue.

Posted by: Doug1 4th Jun 2012, 05:20pm

QUOTE (Isobel @ 4th Jun 2012, 04:14pm) *
I was raised in a housing scheme (Ruchazie) All our neighbours were working class folks like our selves.We had a Glasgow accent ,however it did not include,breed,naw,canny,waz, hoose ,I think you get the picture.

Last visit home I was blown away with the slang I was hearing in the city. Its sad really because Glasgow folks are friendly folks ,but many of the young ones have been brought up listing to all this slang and don't know any better.

Perhaps a few lessons at the primary level in school would help.Maybe a refresher at high school.You can have a nice Glasgow accent and still speak proper English.

Well said Isobel thumbup.gif

Posted by: mlconnelly 4th Jun 2012, 05:56pm

Yes Isobel we can all speak with a nice Glasgswegian accent but as I was born and bred in Glasgow Scotland why should I speak proper English. I speak English with a Glaswegian accent and anyone who doesn't like it can lump it and that includes the superior eejits in Edinburgh. Mary

Posted by: Guest 4th Jun 2012, 06:05pm

So many of you are missing the point. This isn't just about word choice or accent. It's about image. And there's nothing at all wrong with seeking improvement.

Posted by: Isobel 4th Jun 2012, 06:33pm

Your so right guest. thumbup.gif

Posted by: john.mcn 4th Jun 2012, 06:43pm

There is the Glasgow accent and patois, and then there is Ned talk. Two of them are different.

Posted by: angel 4th Jun 2012, 07:03pm

QUOTE (Guest @ 4th Jun 2012, 06:20pm) *
So many of you are missing the point. This isn't just about word choice or accent. It's about image. And there's nothing at all wrong with seeking improvement.

Tourism is a world wide market , and if Scotland does'nt come up to the standards that are expected by tourists's , who pay big money to visit , then Scotland will have failed as a tourist destination , and lets face it , the weather is'nt a plus .
Also as Guest has stated nothing wrong with improvment , whether that be volcabulary plus attitude , and service , it is an on going job in todays tourist Market , if you do'nt keep up with the other tourist destinations , you fail.

Posted by: mlconnelly 4th Jun 2012, 08:49pm

This is all true but do you honestly think the people who are interviewing applicants for jobs are going to give them to someone who speaks like a ned. I dont thinks so, so therefore the lessons on how to meet and greet are totally irrelevant. If the right people are employed for the job then our visitors will receive a right warm welcome regardless of our accent. Mary

Posted by: elaine24 4th Jun 2012, 09:43pm

Business in Glasgow/Scotland is telling us that candidates presented for inerview are unemployable. In the service industry - particularly hospitality, eye contact and customer first skills are mandatory. We cannot get enough native young people with these skills. Surely anything that projects Glasgow and its population in a positive light is to be recommended. We want the world as well as the commonwealth to see us as a progressive city with a fantastic and talented workforce.
Also dont forget we have the Ryder cup in 2014 at Gleneagles. Big year for Scotland - lets showcase what we have here in our amazing country.

Posted by: elaine24 4th Jun 2012, 09:52pm

QUOTE (rumcdonald @ 4th Jun 2012, 04:38pm) *
Well said Isobel.

I too was the product of a housing scheme - but was taught to speak clearly and appropriately. ie there was perhaps the 'slang' we spoke in the playground (and I dont mean offensive words - just colloquilisms) and the lanquage we used in the classroom etc. What I am saying is that we knew which was correct and acceptable in which situation - because we were schooled by our parents and teachers. I am a proud Scot with an accent - probably softened by years overseas and in different parts of UK -but have live the majority of my life in Scotland and sometimes when I am in Glasgow, cannot understand what is being said! eg in the car was I had to ask 5 times what the chap was saying (no he was not Polish) and he was asking me if I wanted my wheels washed! This goes back to my previous post about unemployable youth - I mean if they cannot make themselves understood!! I am not confusing this with braw Scots and our traditional Scots words and dialect which we should always try to keep and be proud of.

Posted by: Elma 5th Jun 2012, 12:48am

QUOTE (Isobel @ 4th Jun 2012, 04:14pm) *
I was raised in a housing scheme (Ruchazie) All our neighbours were working class folks like our selves.We had a Glasgow accent ,however it did not include,breed,naw,canny,waz, hoose ,I think you get the picture.

Last visit home I was blown away with the slang I was hearing in the city. Its sad really because Glasgow folks are friendly folks ,but many of the young ones have been brought up listing to all this slang and don't know any better.

Perhaps a few lessons at the primary level in school would help.Maybe a refresher at high school.You can have a nice Glasgow accent and still speak proper English.

Well said Isobel, after 40+ years in Canada I think I still have a Scots accent but I do not and never have spoken in a Glasgow or Scottish dialect. I use normal, Queen's english words and have had no problem being undertood anywhere in the world and I too, find it very difficult to read posts written in a Glasgow dialect.

Posted by: helen wallace 5th Jun 2012, 02:20am

What a cheek, and lessons in Ediburgh only adds insult to injury. Glasgow is known as the friendly city, the language of friendship is universal.

Posted by: Heather 5th Jun 2012, 10:47am

A one day Training Event will not change a Glasgow accent, but those attending the Course might be advised not to use glesga slang and slow down when speaking as we Scots are inclined to speak quick fast which makes it difficult for foreigners to understand what we are saying.

Like Isobel, I was never allowed to use glesga slang at home, our dad always corrected us and told us to speak properly.
No I don't have a posh voice as I grew up in the Cowcaddens & Barlanark, but would never think to call bread- bried, house-hoose or food- grub, but I do have a habit of saying, 'aye right' when agreeing or kidding with someone.laugh.gif

Our dad also grew up in the Cowcaddens and Hamiltonhill, so he did not have a posh voice either. smile.gif

Posted by: GG 5th Jun 2012, 11:24am

One thing that occurred to me, and which the quango bosses in Edinburgh or Glasgow probably have not considered, is the amount of non-Glaswegians who now work in the customer-facing service industries in Glasgow, especially tourism-related. I was in Frankie and Benny's at the Fort last week, and almost all the waiting, serving and cooking staff were (I assume) Polish. Only the manager was not east European.

The Fort is located in Easterhouse, an area with huge youth unemployment problems, so there is no lack of potential staff living locally.

GG.

Posted by: john.mcn 5th Jun 2012, 01:10pm

But GG, are the local youth willing to work at Franky and Benny's ?

Posted by: Doug1 5th Jun 2012, 02:36pm

QUOTE (Guest @ 4th Jun 2012, 07:20pm) *
So many of you are missing the point. This isn't just about word choice or accent. It's about image. And there's nothing at all wrong with seeking improvement.

thumbup.gif

Posted by: Doug1 5th Jun 2012, 02:39pm

QUOTE (john.mcn @ 5th Jun 2012, 02:25pm) *
But GG, are the local youth willing to work at Franky and Benny's ?

Probably not john and thats why the east Europeans get the jobs

Posted by: wee davy 5th Jun 2012, 03:37pm

'Charm School fer wegians' - aye right!

I have to admit, I deliberately stayed out of this thread - knowing where it might lead.
As one of the 'guilty party' who oft use wegian parlez, I thought better of it.

Let me make it clear, I do it for no other reason than to provide some light heartedness to somewhat straight laced discussion. Also to 'trigger' dialect which has otherwise remained dormant, since leaving Glasgow in 1969.

I think the child in me, (still) likes to relate to fellow Glawegians. Therefore I will continue to use the language of 'the dunny' and the 'midden', with a genuine pride.

Dae ye get a free Mickey Mouse costume, wie this course?
If so - sign me up NOO!
In fact, I'll even DELIVER IT fur ye's LOL laugh.gif

wee davy

Posted by: Guest 5th Jun 2012, 06:00pm

I have travelled the world and now live in Canada and no matter where I went my Scottish accent was loved and I am and always will be a Glaswegian.

Posted by: JAGZ1876 5th Jun 2012, 06:29pm

QUOTE (wee davy @ 5th Jun 2012, 04:52pm) *
I think the child in me, (still) likes to relate to fellow Glawegians. Therefore I will continue to use the language of 'the dunny' and the 'midden', with a genuine pride.

Gaun yersel wee man thumbup.gif

Posted by: droschke7 6th Jun 2012, 12:31pm

It does seem that we do tend to talk to fast, in fact when I learnt German the Germans asked me to slow down as I was talking to fast.

Posted by: Scotsman 6th Jun 2012, 03:11pm

So they are going to spend a quarter of a million quid on these lessons.... plus add in the same again in the fact that those public employees who attend will not be doing their jobs.... and all of a sudden you have a half million being spent on this nonsense that they will probably forget within a couple of days.

Now.... if you were to think about what kind of things visitors to the city actually do get upset and annoyed about does anyone really think it is the Glaswegian accent or a wee bit of patter?? No!! What really annoys tourists and everyone else is the state of the place.... spend that half million quid on cleaning the city centre up and making it more presentable and that will be far better than wasting money on some daft lessons. Outisde the Central Station would be a good place to start!!

Posted by: Melody 6th Jun 2012, 03:12pm

We canni help it if aw the rest is are bit slow. laugh.gif Keep up why don't ye. laugh.gif

Posted by: Doug1 6th Jun 2012, 04:37pm

QUOTE (wee davy @ 5th Jun 2012, 04:52pm) *
'Charm School fer wegians' - aye right!

I have to admit, I deliberately stayed out of this thread - knowing where it might lead.
As one of the 'guilty party' who oft use wegian parlez, I thought better of it.

Let me make it clear, I do it for no other reason than to provide some light heartedness to somewhat straight laced discussion. Also to 'trigger' dialect which has otherwise remained dormant, since leaving Glasgow in 1969.

I think the child in me, (still) likes to relate to fellow Glawegians. Therefore I will continue to use the language of 'the dunny' and the 'midden', with a genuine pride.

Dae ye get a free Mickey Mouse costume, wie this course?
If so - sign me up NOO!
In fact, I'll even DELIVER IT fur ye's LOL laugh.gif

wee davy

Spot on Davy... totally agree with you. I dont speak in traditional glasgow parlance either in day to day life but I enjoy using it purely to keep up with the lingo and to keep the language going in fact yesterday i emailed my daughter for something and slipped in a couple of auld glasgow words. Hey Maybe ahm driftin back to me childhood!!!! Cheers mate

Posted by: len mollins 6th Jun 2012, 07:19pm

hi i notice that this idea came from edinburgh .it brought back memories when i was working in the nhs in england ,one day i was talking to a receptionist in x-ray and not recognising her accent asked her what part of england she came from, the frosty reply was "edinburgh" nuff said.i left glasgow over 40 years ago and am proud to say i still have the glasgow twang and i will not change.

Posted by: GG 7th Jun 2012, 06:30am

Where's the underlying need for the lessons? According to the results of VisitScotland's own research of the quality of visitors' experience of Glasgow:

QUOTE
85% of visitors were satisfied with their trip to Glasgow City overall and 80% will definitely/probably recommend Glasgow City based on their experiences in the city. 56% of all visitors will definitely/probably revisit Glasgow City in the next 5 years.

GG.

Posted by: Doug1 7th Jun 2012, 07:10am

QUOTE (GG @ 7th Jun 2012, 07:45am) *
Where's the underlying need for the lessons? According to the results of VisitScotland's own research of the quality of visitors' experience of Glasgow:


GG.

Perhaps these visitors only met people who were taught to speak nicely GG ie people employed in the hotel / tourist industry smile.gif
________

Posted by: zascot 7th Jun 2012, 07:34am

QUOTE (Scotsman @ 6th Jun 2012, 05:26pm) *
Now.... if you were to think about what kind of things visitors to the city actually do get upset and annoyed about does anyone really think it is the Glaswegian accent or a wee bit of patter?? No!! What really annoys tourists and everyone else is the state of the place.... spend that half million quid on cleaning the city centre up and making it more presentable and that will be far better than wasting money on some daft lessons. Outisde the Central Station would be a good place to start!!

Spot on Scotsman.People go to China and don`t understand a word but still enjoy it.

Posted by: MB 7th Jun 2012, 11:56am

What does it tell us about society - what we learn in the home and in school about personal presentation, when we have to send service staff to charm school? Whatever happened to the ready smile, Please and Thank You, How can I help you etc. But most of all a decent standard of dress - i.e. comfortable, conservative uniform, for wait staff. With lack of standard dress in many cafesrestaurants, it's difficult to tell the staff from the patrons. Many years ago, there was a chocolate house in Edinburgh where staff had to present themselves for inspection before going on duty. Straight seams, tidy hair, clean well presented uniform, polished shoes and clean fingernails. I wonder how that would go down today?

Posted by: rikkiduncan 7th Jun 2012, 12:55pm

I lived in Darlington for 3 yrs, and when I talked I slowed down so that folk would understand me, but as you normally get in areas your not from, you get the comedian, this guy (who drank in my local) was trying to rip me up about my accent, he then asked if I couldn't talk the Queens English, so on that point and in front of a full pub, I replied, '' O.K. my friend, lets take a ''Georgie'' a ''Scouser'' a ''Brummie'' a Cockney'' a person from Cornwall, put them around a table and ask them to have a conversation, and I'm sure that they would all have great difficulty in understanding what each other was saying, and they my friend are all English. The pub erupted in cheers, exit comedian.

Posted by: JAGZ1876 7th Jun 2012, 01:19pm

QUOTE (rikkiduncan @ 7th Jun 2012, 02:10pm) *
I lived in Darlington for 3 yrs, this guy (who drank in my local) was trying to rip me up about my accent, he then asked if I couldn't talk the Queens English

My wife is from that part of England and i've never heard any of the locals speak the queen's English, the only problem i had being understood was when i used words containing more than two syllables.

Posted by: Doug1 7th Jun 2012, 03:13pm

QUOTE (JAGZ1876 @ 7th Jun 2012, 02:34pm) *
My wife is from that part of England and i've never heard any of the locals speak the queen's English, the only problem i had being understood was when i used words containing more than two syllables.

I too lived down south for a few years in Durham city but worked in a wee town called Stanley. I dont have a strong Glasgow accent but my workmates would do a bit of ribbing about my Scottish accent but I got my own back by mimicking their very strong local accent accent It broke the ice and we all had loads of laughs and became the best of pals
________

Posted by: Scotsman 8th Jun 2012, 11:51am

QUOTE (zascot @ 7th Jun 2012, 08:49am) *
Spot on Scotsman.People go to China and don`t understand a word but still enjoy it.

Thanks zascot.... your spot on yourself!!

Tourists love Glasgow and they love it BECAUSE of the people!!

Posted by: Guest 8th Jun 2012, 04:00pm

Billy Connolly has done concerts all over the world and no-one has ever had a problem understanding his accent. Why some chinless wonders seem to think visitors to Glasgow wouldnt understand the Glaswegian accent is beyond comprehension.

Also as far as iam aware the TV series Taggart was shown on English ITV regions and dont recall any complaints about viewers not understanding the Glaswegian accent although you do get the occasional idiot making a mockery of the Scottish accent Mattthew Wright to name but one.

Posted by: *Old Sailor* 8th Jun 2012, 07:27pm

QUOTE (droschke7 @ 4th Jun 2012, 02:57am) *
I beg to differ the Glaswegians you are describing are a very small minority who weren't brought up but dragged up by the scruffs of their necks.

I have stated that I am referring to the typical Glasgow residents, regardless of their social class or upbringing. Your remark is worthy of a snob or a heretic on the defensive.

Posted by: Cornishscot64 9th Jun 2012, 02:32am

QUOTE (MB @ 7th Jun 2012, 01:11pm) *
What does it tell us about society - what we learn in the home and in school about personal presentation, when we have to send service staff to charm school? Whatever happened to the ready smile, Please and Thank You, How can I help you etc. But most of all a decent standard of dress - i.e. comfortable, conservative uniform, for wait staff. With lack of standard dress in many cafesrestaurants, it's difficult to tell the staff from the patrons. Many years ago, there was a chocolate house in Edinburgh where staff had to present themselves for inspection before going on duty. Straight seams, tidy hair, clean well presented uniform, polished shoes and clean fingernails. I wonder how that would go down today?

As an ex. pat Scot originally from Dumfriesshire/Ayrshire and now living in London, I do not know whether to be "amused" or "offended" by this news story, probably the former more although I appreciate that coming from the mother city capital of Edinburgh the mere suggestion will not be welcomed by a large proportion of their western 2nd city counterparts and be seen more of a "dig" than a truly "practical suggestion" to assist communication come 2014 games time.

I would also add here that my still strong Ayrshire accent quarter or a century on from when I "hit the Carlisle road" as it were (complete with Scots slang and habits I might add) does not cause me too many communication problems down here in the multi-cultural and multi-national smoke of London. Some of you may also find it interesting to learn that I am about to represent my adopted city here at a Team London Ambassador during the 2012 Olympics here, based at a prominent location in Central London and expecting to encounter all nationalities and mother tongue languages - I may even try to speak in 30+ year schoolgirl French to them (which coupled with a Scottish accent is quite hilarious to listen to and not exactly authentic I think).

My background is a working class mining community in a rather isolated country town/social housing setting with an ordinary but sound education at the local Academy/High School - I did, however, learn how to read, write and speak in both the local dialect and the vernacular and univeral Queen's English at school and, as an outsider, have to agree with other views expressed on here already that this trend would appear to be lacking in the same community only 30 years' later if I'm totally honest (I do travel back home to Scotland from time to time still).

Being married to a Cornishman (100% Cornish on both sides as far back as you can go and with their own heavy West Country brogue to go with it) made for an interesting communication barrier when our respective parents and extended family met for the first time - mainly down to speed as much as vocabulary being used by the elder Scottish branch I might add. We managed fine in the end though, as you do when you have to and we have friends from all over the world and other parts of the UK, none of which we recall ever having much of an issue understanding what either of us were saying.

So, on balance, I would say that as long as these "customer service" sessions are voluntary rather than compulsory and pitched correctly at the eventual audience that participates, I can see no problem but people do nevertheless still need to be allowed to be "themselves" at games time as much as possible too, and not some random person non grata from across the Pond I think. As London Ambassador we had to compulsorily endure "customer service" training too led by John Lewis, one of the main London 2012 Olympics sponsors and, to be honest, what they suggested was "common sense" and rather purile and funny to watch (it was film clips followed by brief discussion and lasted a max. of 30 minutes in total). Nothing to be afraid of folks, honest - so just go with the flow and enjoy it if you get the opportunity to attend I would recommend !

Posted by: mlconnelly 9th Jun 2012, 08:27am

I've worked in the service industry and part of the training was about how to speak to the customer and thats as it should be. But to suggest that there needs to be these so called Mickey Mouse lessons I personally find it verging on the insulting. As I said before, surely the interviewers are more than capable of sorting out who is or isn't a suitable candidate for the job available. I speak just like most Glaswegians when I'm with friends and family but if I was going to an interview or to any kind of formal meeting I adjust my speach to suit the situation, just as I would, like most people from or in Glasgow, if stopped in the street by any visitor to our country. Mary

Posted by: Melody 9th Jun 2012, 09:06am

Can they actually put us down any further? We have a bad diet, we drink too much, we can't speak properly, we can't give eye contact. What next? It's a wonder we've survived all these years. angry.gif
They make us sound like cretins. angry.gif Ah'm fighting back.....ah've decided.

Weird how we have sent the best doctors, the best scientist, the best engineers, in fact the best everything all around the world, funny how it's only now when they don't need us that we're condemned from all angles.

Posted by: droschke7 9th Jun 2012, 09:40am

QUOTE (*Old Sailor* @ 8th Jun 2012, 09:42pm) *
I have stated that I am referring to the typical Glasgow residents, regardless of their social class or upbringing. Your remark is worthy of a snob or a heretic on the defensive.

went to public school and am an atheist does that count? and most of the people I know in Scotstoun and Whiteinch speak a perfectly understandable English

Posted by: rikkiduncan 11th Jun 2012, 07:54pm

I still laugh at the ''Talk like Mickey Mouse'' most of the Glaswegians I know talk like ''Bill and Ben'' when they're
drunk.

Posted by: droschke7 11th Jun 2012, 08:13pm

maybe they should use the money to send David Cameron to "Good Parenting " School to make sure he doesn't lose a child in the Pub

Posted by: discobot 11th Jun 2012, 11:18pm

anyone posting anything about this being a good idea has no right to call themselves glaswegian!!
the way we speak is part of who we are and i am proud of it. i was brought up in bearsden and speak the way that the edinburgers ken want us to stop. this is who we are, what we are and one of the main reason everyone knows about and loves glasgow. this is also the reason that millions of people worldwide love glasgow and the scottish and the reason why they can all do an impression of a glasgow accent. you dont find people in norway that can do an edinburgh accent. the accent and the manner of the people of glasgow encaptulates what the city is about and sums up the character and nature of the people that live in it. shame on anyone who wants to change that. if you feel like this is acceptable then leave this city as you are not part of it. i have never met anyone that thinks the way the glasgow people speak is doing the city any harm. i personally had a role to play in winning the bid to bring these games to this city and if i had at any point think this would be the reaction of people i would have done my best to scupper any chance of winning. the people backing these things are embarrassing i will never change the way i speak. it is too big and important part of who i am and why i am who i am. if you have an issue with this then im sure you would be much happier in england somewhere( where i can asure all the people love the accent). as that i where they belong SHAME ON YOU!!

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 20th Jun 2012, 09:45pm

QUOTE (JAGZ1876 @ 4th Jun 2012, 09:20am) *
Mickey mouse lessons.........Glaswegians should tell them to go and take a good Donald Duck to themselves.

laugh.gif
I've already mentioned on the boards here somewhere that a German guy I was once talkin' to asked me if I was from Glasgow; where he'd worked at the airport for 12 years.
We were talkin' together in German. laugh.gif
I've had all this looking direct in the eye stuff from my German girlfriend and I explained to her that that's ok but when you have to conciously look someone directly in the eye it can come across a bit confrontational at times so it's sometimes better to just be your self and be natural.
Anyway, it's hard to look someone direct in the eye when you grew up with:-
Look at me when A'm talkin tae ye (slap!)
Don't look at me lik' that. (slap!) laugh.gif


Posted by: wombat 20th Jun 2012, 09:56pm

QUOTE (Melody @ 9th Jun 2012, 11:21am) *
Can they actually put us down any further? We have a bad diet, we drink too much, we can't speak properly, we can't give eye contact. What next?

smile.gif bad breath laugh.gif



 

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 20th Jun 2012, 10:13pm

laugh.gif See you Joey, ye'll git us aw a bad name. laugh.gif

Posted by: wombat 20th Jun 2012, 10:32pm

smile.gif smirk smirk yes.gif


 

Posted by: Melody 21st Jun 2012, 06:57am

laugh.gif Aw naw Joey, no bad breath that's a step too far. ohmy.gif

Posted by: wombat 21st Jun 2012, 10:42pm

unsure.gif odd how humans discriminate against each other melody,look at me and murphy. laugh.gif


 

Posted by: GG 22nd Jun 2012, 05:49am

Here's the timetable for the one day course:

QUOTE
1 Day Schedule, 9am - 4.30pm

Session 1: Introductions & Expectations
Tourism in Glasgow - your role as an Ambassador.

Session 2: Service Excellence - what is it? How can you deliver it?
Understanding different types of customers; identifying ways to deliver outstanding service. Understanding the fragility of the customer experience through moments of truth. Pledges.

Session 3: Choosing a Positive Attitude
Understanding the relationship between feeling good at work and influencing others (colleagues and customers) to feel happy and enthusiastic, and encouraging good teamwork. Pledges.

Session 4: Encouraging Customer Feedback
Importance of feedback and the “Be a PLEASER” strategy. Dealing with challenging customers. Pledges.

Session 5: Continuous Improvement - taking service to the next level
Working on the Disney principles of Setting, People and Processes to support the “orchestration” of the experience. Pledges.

Round up and Feedback.

GG.

Posted by: GG 22nd Jun 2012, 06:31am

Talking about Glasgow and Disney, the Daily Post (Liverpool) was kind enough to quote the following cheeky statement from the manager of one Wrexham service provider yesterday:

QUOTE
"Compared to Glasgow where I have worked Wrexham is like Disney Land."

The article then went on to describe in graphic detail what managers of some service providers in Wales thought was wrong with Glasgow. Maybe tourist bosses should write to the Daily Post to set readers straight!?! angry.gif

GG.

Posted by: Melody 22nd Jun 2012, 04:11pm

Och Martin don't me telling me this. dry.gif

Absolutely Joey, you could show them how to live. smile.gif

Posted by: Elma 22nd Jun 2012, 04:15pm

QUOTE (GG @ 22nd Jun 2012, 07:04am) *
Here's the timetable for the one day course:

GG.

Looks good to me. The volunteers for the Vancouver/Whistler Olympics were given similar workshops. I don't think anyone complained and many got to know one another before the games began.

Posted by: Mathie 20th Jul 2012, 12:40am

How much is this costing Glaswegins and the Scottish ratepayer .
Time is now to say "NO" to extravigant spending by our elected members both local and national.
Time now to ask , Can we justify the investment in our so-called "SUPERSTARS" to the detriment of local sports development?.
I personally don, t think so. Maybe, at 72yrs old, I might be considered as "An old fart"or a "Grumpy oldMan",but, looking at what the youngsters have In my community (nothing), to the money spent on the "egos" and "fat cats," I believe they are paying too high a price for national glory.
Flak coming. Helmit on

Posted by: droschke7 20th Jul 2012, 02:08am

QUOTE (Mathie @ 20th Jul 2012, 02:55am) *
How much is this costing Glaswegins and the Scottish ratepayer .
Time is now to say "NO" to extravigant spending by our elected members both local and national.
Time now to ask , Can we justify the investment in our so-called "SUPERSTARS" to the detriment of local sports development?.
I personally don, t think so. Maybe, at 72yrs old, I might be considered as "An old fart"or a "Grumpy oldMan",but, looking at what the youngsters have In my community (nothing), to the money spent on the "egos" and "fat cats," I believe they are paying too high a price for national glory.
Flak coming. Helmit on

No need fro a helmet if anyone gives you flak they are to stupid too understand the situation.

Posted by: GG 20th Jul 2012, 07:09am

Mathie, I believe you have made some very good points, and many which I am sure strike a chord with people who are struggling to earn a living, feed their kids, or heat their homes.

No politician has yet been able to justify the spending of hundreds of millions of pounds on one-off sports meetings, mostly because there is simply no definitive proof that such meetings generate a sustained, long-term economic legacy for the majority of peole who are forced to pay for the event. There is also no conclusive research-based evidence that there are significant or sustained benefits in terms of increased participation in sports by local people.

The cost, as it stands just now, for the Commonwealth Games is in excess of half a billion pounds, but that figure is expected to rise substantially. Also, this cost does not include other supporting programmes such as the one which is the subject of this topic, where people are to be trained to become more efficient at serving people who will attend the games.

Maybe we are all just "grumpy"? smile.gif

GG.

Posted by: Doug1 27th Jul 2012, 06:01pm

And we are supposed to be a democracy. Perhaps we should take a leaf out of Switzerland book and start having local or regional referendums on major expenditure programs, especially one off events....let the people decide!!

Posted by: CAT 28th May 2013, 03:39pm

QUOTE (Doug1 @ 27th Jul 2012, 06:09pm) *
And we are supposed to be a democracy. Perhaps we should take a leaf out of Switzerland book and start having local or regional referendums on major expenditure programs, especially one off events....let the people decide!!

I have just read this toopic and think your's is great Idea and one that should be used by the council here as we are the ones footing the bill.
Much as the improvements to the east end and other parts of the city are great I really think that the games are waste of money. Some of these improvements could have been done brining jobs and improving the area without being under the guise of an elite event which most Glaswegiens will not be able to attend.
I go to the gym at the emirates as part of my Glasgow life membership which costs around the same as a private gym at which I would be able to use the spa facilities but I have to pay an extra 25 per month if I want to use the spa at this one. I can use the spa at any other Glasgow life gym but not this one because it's so fancy. I am already paying 36 a month. Another case of providing a two tier system for council tax payers.
The biggest laugh was when joining I was charged a 20 "admin fee" I nearly choked. I already pay 166 a month in council tax which I thought paid for such things as administrators.

Posted by: Guvinboay 29th May 2013, 02:06am

QUOTE (Doug1 @ 27th Jul 2012, 06:09pm) *
And we are supposed to be a democracy. Perhaps we should take a leaf out of Switzerland book and start having local or regional referendums on major expenditure programs, especially one off events....let the people decide!!

The problem with that is that Switzerland has the money to do what it likes. The very thought the you are living in a democracy???

And incidentally Switzerland is not a democracy by definition. The official name of the country is "The Theocratic Republic of Helvetia".

Posted by: Scotsman 30th May 2013, 10:13am

I think that having local or regional referendums for really costly events would be a good way forward but its never going to happen. Most of the events are done by politicians who think about the publicity it will get them in the short term. Thats what its all about for them. These politicians dont care if the huge amounts spent will mean less for the services for ordinary people in the city.

Agree with you CAT that having to pay twice for admin is ridiculous. And how come you have to pay more for a spa at one place than another when our council tax paid for building all of these facilities?? Its about time they stopped building all these fancy flashy buildings for show and started doing what people really want for a price they can afford.

Posted by: CAT 30th May 2013, 10:43am

QUOTE (Scotsman @ 30th May 2013, 10:21am) *
Agree with you CAT that having to pay twice for admin is ridiculous. And how come you have to pay more for a spa at one place than another when our council tax paid for building all of these facilities?? Its about time they stopped building all these fancy flashy buildings for show and started doing what people really want for a price they can afford.

I have no problem paying as we have some fantastc facilities but paying twice is a rip off. These facilities are also available to people on bennefits at a reduced cost but from what I understand for some it is a bit out of their budget. Spend less cash make them less flash and then everyone can enjoy it.
As for the games and the cost while it's great to put us on the map I think the costs way out weigh the benefits. Yes we get to have no sustainable housing but I am not sure how many will be for sale and how may for social housing. Surley this investment could have and should have been made without the games.
Am I ranting? I could go on... laugh.gif

Posted by: Scotsman 30th May 2013, 03:03pm

QUOTE (CAT @ 30th May 2013, 10:51am) *
Spend less cash make them less flash and then everyone can enjoy it.

Like it!! thumbup.gif

Its in the news today that the squash court that is being built so that TV cameras can film is going to be knocked down after the games finish even though it cost almost a million pounds. Total waste of money.

I believe that only a fraction of the houses built will go to local people. Not ranting do go on.... laugh.gif

Posted by: guvinjim 6th Jun 2013, 02:16am

QUOTE (Mathie @ 20th Jul 2012, 12:48am) *
How much is this costing Glaswegins and the Scottish ratepayer .
Time is now to say "NO" to extravigant spending by our elected members both local and national.
Time now to ask , Can we justify the investment in our so-called "SUPERSTARS" to the detriment of local sports development?.
I personally don, t think so. Maybe, at 72yrs old, I might be considered as "An old fart"or a "Grumpy oldMan",but, looking at what the youngsters have In my community (nothing), to the money spent on the "egos" and "fat cats," I believe they are paying too high a price for national glory.
Flak coming. Helmit on

If there were no "Super Stars" what's the point in having sports. No soccer super stars to thrill the massess every week. No Tour de France winners, no olympic gold? Give it all to those who who would not aspire to much other than casual acquaintance with the sport ? What about those dedicated 8 hours a day training seven days a week to achieve greatness not just for themselves and their sport but for their country.

Posted by: Lydyabin 28th Jun 2013, 09:18pm

There does appear to be a universal sourness about money being spent on this forum on anything except the poor and unemployed. While I am willing to concede that Labour councilors are to my mind venal and self seeking, dedicated to political righteousness and social engineering, there remains a need for progressive modification to the existing infrastructure of any major city any where in the world. A recent post here was bemoaning the lack of festivals that used to be part of the fabric of life in Glasgow. Public indemnity insurance is now universal for any staged event and the ability of councils to comply with this is severely limited.

The Commonwealth games should be welcome in as such, as it is an opportunity to show piece Glasgow and Scotland. Never mind the cost, "the poor will always be with us" and take the challenge of appearing on the international stage. The eyes of millions will be on Glasgow. Show them what this city is capable of.

Posted by: Harper 28th Jun 2013, 11:32pm

People coming to the commonwealth games, want to see the real glasgow and real people. whoever came up with the idea that people working in the service industry should go through a course to speak proper, many people outside glasgow and beyond love the glesga patter, i bet it was some bowler hat twit that came up with that idea, im begining to think that the scottish covernment and glasgow city council are tories in kilts.

Posted by: GG 13th Jul 2014, 07:17pm

These 'Mickey Mouse' lessons are still running, according to a report in today's Sunday Herald:

QUOTE
Does Glasgow really need lessons in charm...?

I take my hat off to Fiona Young.

It's her job to teach binmen and taxi drivers to be polite and friendly to tourists during the Commonwealth Games. I watch with trepidation as she explains to 10 of Glasgow Taxis' finest that they must not turn the radio up or the intercom off when they have a tricky passenger in the back. Instead they should chat with them, be helpful and above all - smile, smile, smile.

I glance around dubiously. It looks like an episode of Glaswegian Grange Hill - and this is detention. There's a fair bit of eye-rolling and lots of arms are folded. After all, this is common sense, isn't it? Be nice to people. But this is Glasgow. And Glasgow is a friendly city. So why are we teaching Glaswegians to be friendly? ...

Full story here:
http://www.heraldscotland.com/comment/columnists/does-glasgow-really-need-lessons-in-charm-to-give-commonwealth-visitors-a-warm-we.24717440

GG

Posted by: Heather 13th Jul 2014, 07:35pm

Next thing is, they will be giving the bin men top hats so they can doff them to the visiting tourist. wub.gif

Posted by: Elma 13th Jul 2014, 09:02pm

It would be nice if Glaswegians would be polite to tourists visiting the city. Last time I was in Glasgow I found the people in the street and buses very unfriendly. Eyes rolling and pushing when you didn't know the bus fare etc. At the Vancouver Olympics in 2010 the volunteers were all voted 'the most friendly and helpful.'

Posted by: wellfield 13th Jul 2014, 10:59pm

Glaswegians are very friendly in general,but there's no way they can speak the 'glesga slang'.....I've spoken to dozens of Canadian and Americans who have visited Scotland,and it's the same every time "couldn't understand most of the conversation"....but they also said the same of England.....I've said it before "If you speak the way your Mother and teacher taught you,then there's no problem......Ahl' talk tae' yi' aw' later oan'....chuckle