Glasgow Guide Home

Whats On Glasgow Guide
  Glasgow What's On


    Glasgow Reviews


    Glasgow Gallery


      Glasgow Links
Discuss | Guestbook | Postcard | News | Weather | Feedback | Search | About | What's New
Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )                >> View Today's Topics <<

6 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> The Final Day Of Paddy's Market, 200 years of history draws to a close
GG
post 14th May 2009, 11:01pm
Post #1


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
In the end the traders at Paddy's Market rose above the nonsense that has been written about them – and their small, thriving enterprises – over the past two years. Today, on the final day of trading in Shipbank Lane, the traders brought the curtain down on almost 200 years of Glasgow tradition with quiet resolve, stoicism, and no small measure of wry Glaswegian humour.

Paddy's Market was named after Irish immigrants who journeyed to Glasgow in the 1850s to escape the ravages of the potato famine. A small group of entrepreneurial immigrants began buying and selling second-hand clothes in the Bridgegate area next to Glasgow Green. The railway arches at Shipbank Lane have been home to Paddy's Market since 1935, when the descendants of the original immigrants joined indigenous traders who had been trading in rags and other goods there since the 1820s.

Glasgow Guide was at Shipbank Lane this afternoon to capture the close of trading on the final day of Paddy's Market. I've posted some photos below. If you have any thoughts or memories of Paddy's Market please take time to leave them here by posting a reply.

Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image


Attached Image

Attached Image


GG.


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Celyn
post 15th May 2009, 12:15am
Post #2

Super Visitor
***
Posts: 78
Joined: 19th Apr 2005
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1,912
Well done for getting the photos! I haven't been to Paddy's Market for a long time, but I am rather sad to see it killed off. sad.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
**Debbie**
post 15th May 2009, 12:46am
Post #3






so sorry to see this go!!!!

Glasgow isnt the way it used to be for a lot of glaswegians these days... i was born and brought up in Glasgow and although i dont live here anymore, it will always live in my heart....that where I'm from, that's who I am!!

Every Saturday going into town with Mum and Dad to always see PADDYS MARKET!!!!

Will there be anything left of the Historic City ?????

Another Landmark gone!!!!!


xxxxxxxDebsxxxxxx
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GG
post 15th May 2009, 12:50am
Post #4


Administrator
Group Icon
Posts: 9,121
Joined: 25th Jul 2003
From: Glasgow
Member No.: 1
A readers' poll from a local newspaper today:

QUOTE
As we [sic] exclusively report on the last day of trading at Paddy’s Market in Glasgow, are you sorry to see it go?

Yes: 67.7%
No: 30.8%
Don't know: 1.5%

GG.


--------------------
Help: Register :: Login :: Forgot password? :: gg@glasgowguide.co.uk
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Taylor9
post 15th May 2009, 12:59am
Post #5


Visitor
***
Posts: 49
Joined: 2nd Apr 2009
From: North Ayrshire
Member No.: 6,735
I went up there a few times everyone were so friendly.People will miss not only for the bargains you could pick up,but for the banter folks standing having a cup a tea and blethering away it just gave you a Buzz,yes it will be missed by lots of people from all walks of life.A way of life Gone
and i am Sure Not Forgot..
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
maycee
post 15th May 2009, 01:08am
Post #6

Unpacking
*
Posts: 9
Joined: 21st Dec 2004
Member No.: 1,636
I don't live in Glasgow now. But I will always have great memories of Paddy's market when my mom used to take me down there on Saturday or Sunday, I always knew mom would buy me something good at the end of the day. She used to say her aunt was a "hawker". It must be in my genes, because to this day,anywhere I travel, my first destination is a 'type' of Paddy's market.

Nothing is the same in Glasgow. As they say we must give way to progress.

Maycee
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tamhickey
post 15th May 2009, 01:24am
Post #7


City Key Holder
******
Posts: 735
Joined: 14th Jan 2006
From: glasgow
Member No.: 2,833
Yet another piece of Glasgow's history bites the dust thanks to our City Council. My wife was there today and she tells me she spoke to a few of the traders who said that they would now be operating from the Barras on a daily basis. Whilst this means that some of them will continue to do business, it seems the response was universal > things just won't be the same anymore.
The Barras and Paddy's used to complement one another and there was business aplenty for both markets but now it seems there will be too many traders chasing too few customers. The bigger question remains, could this just be the beginning of the end for Glasgow's open air markets entirely? Let's hope not, but today a huge chunk of the character of our city was decimated at the stroke of a pen.
A sad day for Glasgow and it's people.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mack48
post 15th May 2009, 01:43am
Post #8

Unpacking
*
Posts: 4
Joined: 24th Mar 2009
Member No.: 6,699
I am very saddened by the closure of paddys market.I have Been a regular visitor & buyer in the market since 1979!!& I was such a regular that many stalls etc knew me by name.I would mainly visit to buy hi fi equipment,tv's video recorders,& much more electrical equipment to fridges,microwaves,& dare I say it,it was an ideal place to purchase tapes of almost any music artist I wanted,& when my son was around 13/14 & I had got him a commodore amiga computer,there were a few stalls that I would spend between 10 & 50 on floppy disc games for my son,& they were always of highest quality & I still have around 400+ floppy disc games & 2 commodore amigas kept in top condition that I've brought out again to have fun with since my sin grew up & us a dad himself now.(the 2nd amiga originally bought,ALL,at amazing prices was for spares but ended up being fully self repaired & had added memory etc,& became the main amiga computer used by my son,& ME)!!& still works today.Also I got the first Sinclair 8k rubber keyed first home computer & the next,a 48k sinclair spectrum 48k both in absolute immucuate condition to this day.When I couldn't afford good quality hi fi equipment I would buy mainly broken ones honestly told by traders,but being a semi qualified electronics engineer,within a few hours of getting them home they would be in full working order,at a cost of around 5 to 15.& lasted a long time before I would sell them on & go to paddys market & buy more.As a musician I would buy very cheap guitars,keyboards,Amps,etc etc.& turn them into high quality instruments.I would also buy clothes,like jeans,& other trousers,suits,T-shirts,jerseys,& more.I don't think I ever visited paddys market without leaving with a carrier bag of goods,to Black bags very heavy into my car or taxi.I could fill this website with goods I've bought at extremely amazing prices.but won't take up the space.I will definately miss paddys market for great bargains,& I would go so far as to say,it beat the barras hands down.The closure rather than upgrade eludes me,as again I would see a lit of the barras closed down before the great paddys market.Aside of the,"fair enough",hidden trading,it was amass with legal goods sales,& will miss it very much.Dron buying a broken top brand hi fi unit & replacing a fuse or diode & getting amazing sound from a 5 deal,can't,& will never be beaten.& when I needed jeans etc,at 1/2 for top brands will never be matched.RIP paddys market,& I truly hope the traders,who stuck together will find a new type of walk round units (damp & cold ad dome where),they find a new place & us old glaswegian ordinary low income folk find out about it.Rhanks to all traders & god bless.&,Please,get together in a a place that won't shut you down,whoever it was that ended paddys market.Shame on them.The poor depended on paddys market very much as I would always see the same old faces buying or selling down there.Very saddened regular.Big Mack.youll be sadly missed.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
27stowst
post 15th May 2009, 02:11am
Post #9


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,558
Joined: 26th Mar 2009
From: glasgow
Member No.: 6,716
I remember going to the market with my Mammy when I was young, so not recently! Strangely enough my enduring memory is of my Mammy saying to me "When we're done here we'll go for a wee cuppa tae the Resta your auntie (restaurant) cos there's nae room tae Resta your Mammy!! I thought that was hilarious and just about p**d masel laughing!! Seriously though it's sad that another wee part of our culture has gone. Good luck to all the traders now vying for business at that other Glasgow landmark, The Barras.


--------------------
Slainte Mhor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
**Haggischick**
post 15th May 2009, 02:14am
Post #10






Oh my Paddy's market gone. When I come home to Scotland now where will I go! is The Barra's adn Candleriggs still there!

Lots of memories of paddy's market and all that area
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
lindamac
post 15th May 2009, 02:51am
Post #11


Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 5,634
Joined: 22nd Sep 2006
From: australia
Member No.: 3,807
I went to paddys market a few times with my sisterinlaw whos entire family,The Chattertons, were hawkers that all had stalls there, anything from a needle tae an anchor could be bought so to speak,sure there was knock offs too but majority was cotia.I think Glasgow without the markets especialy Paddys market will be like summer without sunshine what a loss to the nostalga of Glasgow,very sad to hear it is closed down now.

I recall when Mrs Cathy Chatterton [now deceased]was getting low on stocks she would take me & her daughter alexis to all the jumble sales & she would buy up big, hence why we always had to go help her ,We got our pick of the bunch & always enjoyed the hot peas n vinegar & home baked goodies for sale at the jumbies all over Glasgow may I add.Mrs Chatterton had a great reputation for her stuff being new or near to new as possible, she would wash everything iron it getting it ready for resale at the markets.

My own brother her soninlaw often got his best 2 & 3 piece suits,a quick trip tae the dry cleaners then ready to wear,she did that for years alongside of buying things from cash n carry places & her personal knitting of many a thing such as gloves tammys scarves etc etc always remember her huge knitting machine was set up in her living room ticking away with her knocking up something or another,she fair kept me & her daughter in the latest trends in clothing as I recallalso a fair few folk that lived in our street at the time,we had part of Paddys market living up oor close in Springburn laugh.gif wub.gif .


--------------------
Ye Cin Take The Lassie Oota Glesga But Ye Cannae Take Glesga Oota The Lassie
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*donald*
post 15th May 2009, 03:27am
Post #12






Paddy's was often the first stop for poor Irish migrants coming off the "Irish boats at the Broomielaw, at the end of Shipbank lane. The Shipbank Inn, at the corner of the Saltmarket and the Briggate, was where the tobacco and other merchants gathered for "coffee" and to buy and sell cargoes alighting to and from the quayside. Promisary notes were given and received there on trust, originating in the Scottish banks pound notes. The tobacco traders did NOT own the tobacco and sugar lands of English colonists, despite the latest propaganda. Theirs was an entrepreneural trade. The first balck slave to lanf there was immeiately freed by the local authorities and the Churches. They gave the planters credit on a year's crops and sold them manufactured goods. Among the goods were Scottish linen products made from home grown flax, which was taxed out of existence by the British Government, as was the home based sugar beet industry. They were taxed out in favour of the Irish Linen Industries, owned by London as were the London based fish merchants of old Derry.The white lined suits, worn by South American, Mexican peons, slaves Apaches and other South Western tribes were from this trade. The Scottish Churches of the day were against slavery, just as they are now opposed to the British Nationalist Government's Trident and war in Iraq. The war with America cost Glasgow the Tobacco trade. The trade was shipped by waggons to Edinburgh and from their to France. It was all done by trust from the French Hugenot and Jacobite allies. Who would trust the bankers of today?

St Andrew's Cathedral near Paddy's ws the first Catholic Cathedral built in Scotland since the Reformation. The Irish migrnat wisely choes Scottish bishops and clergy to run the church, Naily the Beaton family form the North East of Scotland. The whole arae from the Saltmarket to Calton, Trongate and the Hight St was heavily overpopulated by Irish and Highland Gaelic speaking migrants. They were noted by their "Hamish and "Seamus" identifying nicknames, by the local inhabitants. Several hundred MacDonnells from Glengarry, who had stayed there for years emigrated with their chief, from the Broomielaw, to the Red River settlement of Canada, .

The arch across from the High Court, next to Paddys's was where the radical martyrs of 1820 were hanged, whilst the English troops held back the angry crowds, who ripped up the railings to attack them. The rioters in Greenock used a battering ram to release Martyr prisoners and fought the troops on the streets , several were shot in the melee by the local militia, as were locals in Duntocher and elsewhere. There are no monuments or plaques to the 1820 Uprising in Glasgow. Thought there is a plaque in Broad Street Stirling, donated by the local Labour Party. Baird and Hardie were hung there. Govan ILP had a banner withe 1820 Rising banner slogan, "Scotland Free or a Desert". Their bodies decapitated were brought to Sighthill cemetery and buried at night, as the City faithers were afraid of further riots from the angry citizens. There are no monuments to the "Army of the Provisional Government", who took over the meat market and the Bank of Scotland at Exchange Square. The officers of the 19th Hussars who massacred the insurgents at the Battle of Bonnymuir, near Bonnybrig, were housed in the Steps Inn at the continuing Stockwell Street and met at the Trades Hall across the road. There used to be a plaque to James Connolly, who lived nearby, near the site of Marks & Spencers. at the corner of the Trongate there is plaque at the building that was once a bank, after it was the Shawfield Mansions, where Charles Edward Stuart stayed when he occupied Glasgow. He was said to have demanded 40,000 brogues for his army, though some say the Provost was hard of hearing and thought wanted 40,000 rogues from the city, which were in plentiful supply. Cameron of Locheil persuaded Cherlie not to sack the City for going with the Hunoverians. The Tolbooth Bells are entitled to peal for the "Gentle Lochiel whenever he visits the City. We have a Han(g)over Street and a George Square in the London Government's honour, but no 1820 place names.

Rob Roy was reputed to have escaped from the Tolbooth jail at the old Cross of Trongate and the Saltmercat. His men, it is said, plied the Heilan guards with jugs of Uisge., to allow him to escape. He was captured whilst drunk in the Saltmarket. The MacGregors would wade ashore from the Broomielaw, after sailing doon the Leven from Loch Lomond, with their coos and trade them for cash, nails, salt and other manufactured goods from the mercat.

The Irish were landing there in droves before the Tottie famine of the 1840's, mainlly due to the invention of the screw propeller and cheaper passage. They were exploited during the Industrial Revolution by Irish gangers, who organised their accommodation and wages from fermers, at first as seasonal workers. They often paid out in pubs, deducting board and expenses. This practice went on till recently. One notorious Irish ganger, who turned gangster was shot a few years ago in the City by a rival Irish gangster, whom he had crossed. There was no need for the poverty of the famine, theri was plenty of dairy produce making their way to the Irish docks on their way to England, passing starved corpses along the countryside with grass in their mouths. The poor Irish tenants never saw the caricatured Irish pig, as it was sold for cash to pay the rackrenting Anglo landlords.

Like the rest of Glasgow the whole area is steeped in history, as the well in Stockwell St, where Wallace was reputed to have stocked it well with English bodies. The "Wallace Well" was a tactic to contaminate the wells and larders of the occupation forces, when Wallace had to flee after a victory. This tactic was also known as the Douglas Larder, after Bruce's right hand man, Douglas who was also skilled in such guerilla tactics. He was known as the Black Douglas by the English and Scottish traitors and the "Good Sir Douglas" by the Scottish resistance.

Paddy's Market is to "upgraded" to a yuppie craft market, like the one in Merchant City Attempts to "yuppify" the area by the Cooncil and will surely the same fate as the old Fishmercat, due to the, very visual, surrounding poverty, which they and their Westminster bosses are incapable of tackling. The Cooncil's Unionist policies of the future are are as bleak as their policies of the past and present.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
wee anne
post 15th May 2009, 03:46am
Post #13

Visitor
***
Posts: 46
Joined: 29th Jul 2003
Member No.: 172
I remember as a wean i would go to Paddys Market with my Granny ,her next door neighbor was a Hawker at the Market,she wore a leather belt with a pouch where she put the money from things she sold,,I grew up in the Calton over 60 yrs ago and its sad to see the old place go,,,
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agnes & Robert
post 15th May 2009, 04:12am
Post #14

Mega City Key Holder
******
Posts: 1,051
Joined: 28th Nov 2008
From: VANCOUVER BRITISH COLUMBIA
Member No.: 6,256
QUOTE (27stowst @ 15th May 2009, 02:40am) *
I remember going to the market with my Mammy when I was young, so not recently! Strangely enough my enduring memory is of my Mammy saying to me "When we're done here we'll go for a wee cuppa tae the Resta your auntie (restaurant) cos there's nae room tae Resta your Mammy!! I thought that was hilarious and just about p**d masel laughing!! Seriously though it's sad that another wee part of our culture has gone. Good luck to all the traders now vying for business at that other Glasgow landmark, The Barras.

The last time my Wife and I were at Paddy's Market was on 2005 when we were home on holiday, my Wife bought a lot of figurines which are all over the house, now they are more centimental now that Paddy's Market is finished
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
*Weegie*
post 15th May 2009, 05:43am
Post #15






Although I now stay in Aberdeen, I am quite sad to see the demise of Paddys Market, I haven't been there for years but have fond memories of the place.Is there no chance of a re-think, and bring it back?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

6 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st Oct 2019

All material in the site Glasgow Guide is copyright of the Glasgow Guide Organisation. This material is for your own private use only, and no part of the site may be reproduced, amended, modified, copied, or transmitted to third parties, by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. All rights reserved.

Glasgow Hotels: book cheap hotels in Glasgow online now.