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> Springburn Pubs, Springburn in the 1970's
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*BigArturo1*
post 14th May 2007, 12:37pm
Post #1






Some memories of pubs in Springburn in the 1970's. Staring northwards and working south, we had the Spring Inn heading out towards Colston. Opposite the Spring Inn was Eastfield Railway Depot which had a hidden path through the undergrowth up to the pub called the Burma Road. This was used every lunchtime by thirsty railway workers sneaking out of the depot for a pint.
The Boundary Bar was at the corner of Hawthorn Street, The Terminus Bar (Healy's) was at the corner of Elmvale Street at the bus terminus. Across the road was the famous Quin's Bar at the gushet of Balgrayhill. Quin's was run by the one and only Willie Kennedy who one day when asked for a bag of cripsps, replied "the cafe's next door, son". Quin's was a strange shaped pub with a top bar with the entrance on the Balgray and a bottom bar with the entrance on Springburn Road. The pub also had various rooms where old guys sat with their pints beside open coal fires and sang their hearts out. Across from Quins was The Kelvin (Gemmells) ran by Donegal man Eddie Boyle and his fearsome wife Margaret who threw out more rowdy customers than the barmen. Further up Springburn Road was The Stag (the Stab Inn), later nenamed The Locomotive, then Thompsons across the road. I vaguely remember The Commercial before we got to Springburn Station which had The Bells and The Victoria opposite. There was also The Haven at the top of th library stairs which was shaped like a coffin ! Further down we had The Eureka and Smiths opposite the fire station at Keppochill Road. Then is was a dry run down to Clark's at the corner of Petershill Road and Sherry's at the corner of Auchentoshan Terrace. Further down opposite the St Rollox Railway workshops, we had The Cawder, The Caley and Dougans, all of which did a roaring trade from the railway workers.
It was always our intention to have a pint in every pub between Dougan's and The Spring Inn and live to tell the tale but we never managed it despite many years of trying !
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Tennscot
post 14th May 2007, 10:23pm
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You`ve got some memory Arturo 1 . I never really drank in any of them , but I looked for my father in a lot of then, `specially the Victoria bar. Usually with his mates Harry King , Pea Mc Dermaid. his brother Commie, another man Logan, can`t remember his first name.. Worked as a butcher in Hendersons the Butchers. Thanks for the memory !!!
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clmcm25
post 15th May 2007, 11:30am
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Where the Spring Inn was still stands but its now a motor parts shop.

The Talisman on Balgrayhill Road has been lying empty for over 10 years now while the council argue over a compulsory purchase order with its owner.

My dad worked in the Cawder in the early-70s just before he got married. Young guy with an Irish accent at that point before the Glaswegian got the better of him! That building was pulled down recently after lying empty following a fire for a couple of years which is a shame as I heard it was listed.

Along with industry and shops, Springburn's pubs have also declined. Nowadays all that's left is the Caley in Sighthill, the Pinkston Bar and Benson's down Keppochhill Road, the Highland Fling and on Springburn Way The Bell's, Shevlane's and Thomson's are all still going.

On Edgefauld Road the Morven is still open but if it weren't for the Celtic Club closing a few years back that would probably be shut as well.
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lindamac
post 15th May 2007, 11:55am
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laugh.gif I had a wee night oot in that wee celtic club,just that 1 & only time with my pals,a hale bunch of us lassies awe got drunk in there 17yrs ago haha memories It was my wee farewell night oot with the girls afore a left for Australia laugh.gif jings a forgoat aboot it thanks for reminding me mate.cheers Do you come frae Springburn? I do,we always called the Spring Inn the spring Bin in a nice way though cos My husband & I spent many a fri & sat in there cos we were saving up tae get married & didnt wanna pay toon prices haha tight int it?,My dad was Jock Scott whom was a humungus man who drank too much frequented it for years n years mum always threatened tae take his dinner doon tae um then haha


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Ye Cin Take The Lassie Oota Glesga But Ye Cannae Take Glesga Oota The Lassie
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*BigArturo1*
post 15th May 2007, 12:18pm
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On the subject of The Cawder Vaults, we used to work across the road in the Caley Railway Workshops which provided quite an income for Eddie Donnelly, the manager of the pub in the 1970's.
The barmen used to fill around two dozen pints to within an inch of the top at ten to twelve every day ready for the midday influx of railway workers who then had their pint quickly topped up. They only had a half hour dinner break so they had to maximise consumption in the short time they had. Some could manage 5 or 6 pints then return to the factory to operate high voltage machinery !
I remember one barman, a wee fly guy called Wylie, who had a scam going with a leaky optic behind the bar. The optic, which dripped whisky into a glass positioned below it, used to be belted by Wylie everytime he passed it walking round the bar. This would speed up the glass being filled which he would knock back in a wanny when the manager wasn't looking. This was quite a skillful operation and we reckoned Wylie managed around 8 or 9 free halfs durinig his shift - he was always half cut when booking off as I remember.
Sherrys Bar at the corner of Auchentoshen Terrace operated a similar system of filling glasses for the lunchtime influx but instead of beer, they had trays of El Dorado - South Africa's finest vino, poured ready for the more discerning railway drinkers !
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*BigArturo1*
post 15th May 2007, 07:29pm
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Regarding your comments on the Cawder Vaults, we used to work opposite the pub in the Caley Railway workshops (St Rollox) and the pub made a fair bit of revenue from the railway trade. The bar was run by Eddie Donnelly in the 70's and they used to top up around two dozen pints to within an inch of the top everyday around ten to twelve, ready for the Caley lunchtime invasion at midday. All pints were then topped up to maximise the time the punters could spend drinking as they only got a half hour dinner break. I remember some guys managing to swallow 5 or 6 pints then go back to work high voltage machines !
There used to be a wee fly man called Wylie who worked behind the bar in The Cawder and had a scam going with a leaky whisky optic. The optic leaked periodically into a glass placed below it and everytime wee Wylie passed the optic, he would whack the bottle to fill the glass more quickly. After a few trips round the bar and some more whacks, the glass would contain around a quarter gill and Wylie would quickly swally in a wanny when the boss was not looking and replace the empty glass under the leaky optic ! We reckoned he managed around 7 or 8 free quarter gills during his shift and he always booked off looking half cut. Just managing to supplement his income in the days before the minimum wage !
Sherry's Bar at the corner of Auchentoshen Terrace also had a similar scheme for the midday railway rush but this did not involve pints of beer but wine. The pub would have trays of glasses of El Dorado, South Africa's famous vino (of the fortified vintage) all ready for rapid consumption by the punters with a more discerning taste in beverages !
I would imagine this set up went on all over the city where factories had pubs opposite, like the shipyards for example where some readers would have similar tales to tell.
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BigArturo1
post 16th May 2007, 02:18pm
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Regarding your comments on the Cawder Vaults, we used to work opposite the pub in the Caley Railway workshops (St Rollox) and the pub made a fair bit of revenue from the railway trade. The bar was run by Eddie Donnelly in the 70's and they used to top up around two dozen pints to within an inch of the top everyday around ten to twelve, ready for the Caley lunchtime invasion at midday. All pints were then topped up to maximise the time the punters could spend drinking as they only got a half hour dinner break. I remember some guys managing to swallow 5 or 6 pints then go back to work high voltage machines !
There used to be a wee fly man called Wylie who worked behind the bar in The Cawder and had a scam going with a leaky whisky optic. The optic leaked periodically into a glass placed below it and everytime wee Wylie passed the optic, he would whack the bottle to fill the glass more quickly. After a few trips round the bar and some more whacks, the glass would contain around a quarter gill and Wylie would quickly swally in a wanny when the boss was not looking and replace the empty glass under the leaky optic ! We reckoned he managed around 7 or 8 free quarter gills during his shift and he always booked off looking half cut. Just managing to supplement his income in the days before the minimum wage !
Sherry's Bar at the corner of Auchentoshen Terrace also had a similar scheme for the midday railway rush but this did not involve pints of beer but wine. The pub would have trays of glasses of El Dorado, South Africa's famous vino (of the fortified vintage) all ready for rapid consumption by the punters with a more discerning taste in beverages !
I would imagine this set up went on all over the city where factories had pubs opposite, like the shipyards for example where some readers would have similar tales to tell.
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flam
post 19th May 2007, 12:29pm
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Hi Big Arturo1..Eddie Donnelly manager of the Cawder Bar stayed across the way from us in Sunnylaw St..Cheers Flim
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elky barr
post 20th Jun 2007, 08:23pm
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we all drank in thompsons,movern,healys,quinns,spinginn,all tim pubs
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lindamac
post 21st Jun 2007, 04:41pm
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Hate tae burst yer bubble ElkyBarr but the springInn was our Faimly Pub Dad [Big Jock Scott]was a staunch orangeman furr years afore he found oot it doesnt put his dinner oan the table ,he went to the Spring Inn for years as did we all right up untill I came here 17yrs ago .
so Theres no Tim pub in the springInn,as you say , tae be found in the SpringInn at all at anytime .


It was better known as the local pub for mixed religeons even on Celtic Rangers days the match would be televised in the bar for the men but never were they ever allowed tae wear team colours etc so community mixed was all I ever knew the SpringInn as being.Our family affectionately called it the springBin spring Inn & faw oot awe spent oot laugh.gif


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Ye Cin Take The Lassie Oota Glesga But Ye Cannae Take Glesga Oota The Lassie
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aaron king
post 31st Aug 2007, 01:13pm
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This is for lindamac,the SPRING INN sign is still in the allotments across from where the pub stood,sad sight linda,
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lindamac
post 31st Aug 2007, 01:38pm
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sad.gif Aye yer right there Matey whit a sad sight tae see the cheery wee spring Inn sign spending its auld days amidst the plotts eh? wow!nooadays och that widd break yer heart sad.gif Nae matter witt ah loved that wee pub & had many a great wee night in it tae as did my faimly awweee too sad Aaronking thanks for letting me see the phoaty pal cheers eh.


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Ye Cin Take The Lassie Oota Glesga But Ye Cannae Take Glesga Oota The Lassie
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gallowgategal
post 4th Sep 2007, 09:30pm
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My dad worked in the Caley and spent a lot of time in the Cawder. He was pally with Eddie Donnelly and his older brother John who after my dad had died came up and asked my mum for the bookie slip him and my dad had put on 3 days before!

My dad also had a pal, Matt Marshall, who managed one of the pubs in Springburn Road (maybe Sherry's?) and I think my dad sometimes did a shift behind the bar.

My first part time job when I was 18 was in the Sidings in Sighthill and everyone was really nice to me as I was the "wean", I also worked for a few weeks in the Morven but stopped working there as it interfered with my social life !

Nowadays I spend most of my time on the other side of the bars cool.gif


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stevedr
post 2nd Nov 2007, 01:29pm
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My dad worked for Lyons in Possil..Jimmy Dewar...he enjoyed a drink and frequented Smiths, The Vicky, Bells..to namr but a few..!
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BigArturo1
post 9th Nov 2007, 01:48pm
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In the days before mobile phones, we Caley boys used to have the phone numbers of all the pubs around the factory to enable us to warn thirsty workers who had nipped out during working hours, that their gaffer was looking for them. I well remember working in the Charles Street offices and getting a call from the storemen (who could not dial outside) to get me to warn someone who was drinking in The Peasie Club / The Cawder / the Sidings / The Glenbar etc..to get back to work quickly. The system worked well for years as there were various secret entrances around the factory perimeter which we could access throughout the day if anyone fancied a pint after the official lunchbreak.
The Caley storemen were legendary in their drinking exploits during working hours and I well remember a group of them escaped one summer afternoon to play bowls on the green opposite the Hurdy Gurdy pub in Townhead. They were spotted by a foreman passing in his car and were all docked a half days pay as I remember. Their Sunday shifts also involved regular visits via the railway van to the Ashfield Club in Hawthorn Street during working hours before that was sussed also.
Early morning visits (before the official 11am opening time) were often made out to The Budgie opposite the fruit market on Blochairn Road which opened early for the shift workers. Many a hangover was cured by an 0930 visit to The budgie for a roll and sausage washed down by a couple of pints of lager then sneaked back into the factory before the gaffers spotted we were missing. The lunchtime takings at these pubs must have been decimated when the factory slimmed down its workforce from 3000 to 300 in the 80's as you could not move between 12 and 1230 and between 4 and 5pm every day with thirsty railway workers.
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