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> Salvation Army Maternity Homes, History of SA homes - Homeland/Redhall or Red Hall, Cleveden/Fraser of
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TeeHeeHee
post 1st Aug 2010, 11:29pm
Post #16


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Hi Irene, I remember reading that; when you found your cousin through GG. I remember thinking Great, good on you kid and being so glad that these boards do work.
Of course I'll keep pluggin' away and now Auzzieann has given me another link; "Jigsaw", the names appropriate enuff, isn't it?, since no one knows better than you what a complete puzzle this whole thing can be; a wee piece here and that wee piece might go there rolleyes.gif
Great Picture by the way of your dad as a wee baby. I can imagine your surprise when you found that out laugh.gif


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the brauns
post 2nd Aug 2010, 12:20am
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Tomi, good luck in your search with "Jigsaw"!! Wouldn't it be wonderful if they had something. I've been reading these posts and hoping for you. So glad we are living in the age of computers, what would our searches have been without them!

You're right, I was "over the moon" when I found out the picture was of my dad, gran and grandpa!
Thank goodness Dad's cousin was still able to identify the picture. As the years go on, there will be fewer living links to the past and it will be up to you and me, my friend, to sort out the pieces.

Best of luck and you know, if there's anything I can do from over here, I am there for you. I hope something unlocks the key to your mum and you can find her again.
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**Isobel**
post 31st Mar 2011, 09:07am
Post #18






I was in the Frazer of Allander in 1976. There was a group of us. Our dormitory was up a spiral staircase. We each had a bed, wardrobe and a rug at the side of the bed. The sheets were changed weekly with the top one being placed at the bottom and so on. The room was surrounded at the top with horrible pictures (like horse and hounds) etc. and there was a fire escape door in the room, which was locked anyway. I remember one of the officers Captain Crossley. All of the girls had to work in the kitchen, scrubbing the cookers, floors, worktops, peeling the potatoes for everyone. It was also a children's home but we were not allowed to talk to the children. One of the girls had went into labour and what I remember she was having twins and one child died. After this Queen Mothers maternity hospital kept a better watch on all of us, I was taken in to the hospital a month early (I also was having twins). Soon after a new wing was opened for the Mother's and we were all brought down from the attic and were all almost in a annex to the main part of the house, with the labour room next to us. We had a lounge that opened up into a garden (this was the nicest bit about the place). At night we would all sit talking about our life. The kitchens larder was padlocked but one of the girls was able to open it and we managed to get some bits out without them noticing.
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janer
post 17th Apr 2012, 09:38am
Post #19

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Hello everyone,

I've been fascinated reading some of the posts on this thread: I'm an author & social historian (the proud daughter of a born & bred Glasgwegian, by the way!) currently writing a book about the stigma of illegitimacy from 1918 to the 1960s, to be published by Penguin Books in 2015. I've been asking for personal experiences in various online & printed publications, and have been getting a brilliant response, but some of the posts on here are so moving and so vivid, I'd love to know more.

Everyone I mention in the book, and every circumstance, will be completely anonymous if that's what you wish: I just want to make it clear to readers how incredibly much things have changed, just within a generation or two. If you'd like to know more, or feel you might be willing to contribute with memories of what it was like to bear - or to be - an illegitimate child during this period (other people's attitudes, unexpected sources of support, how you feel about things in retrospect etc.) I'd love to hear from you, either here or via my website, where there's a questionnaire for guidance, on http://www.jane-robinson.com.

Thanks!
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**rena**
post 19th Apr 2012, 11:36pm
Post #20






hi, i have been reading all this with interest, i too was sent to the home to have my son born in October 1974 and also worked in the kitchen all the week before Lawrence was born on the Saturday night, a big bouncing 9lb 8oz i went into labour while mopping the floor at the end of my week on kitchen duties. i found this site because i have just been downloading a form to send to the adoption contact register and couldn't remember the name of the home but now recognise the Cleveland part of the address, thank you all for helping me out. I don't know if my son will want to know me after all this time, but my mother who has passed away has sent me a message through a medium my daughter went to see saying i should try and contact him, its not easy. i left the home in a taxi with him to go to central station to catch a train to Kilwinning when he was a few weeks old as i decided not to have him adopted but my dad wouldn't let me take him home, they made arrangements for him to stay in a council home for a while till i tried to get a council house but it never happen in the first year, i could only visit him for a couple of hours on weekend afternoons it broke my heart to see him in a cot or playpen with no company so i gave in and signed the adoption papers when he was nearly a year old to give him a better chance, i fell out with my parents and rebelled and then ran away from home soon after and came down south. he was registered in his dads surname of Cuthbertson as he was named after his little brother but his dad dumped me within a few months. i have shut this out of my mind for years and tried to get on with my life nad now feel so ashamed reading all your stories.
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lesley brown
post 29th Apr 2012, 12:48am
Post #21


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Rena
Don't feel bad about giving your Son up for adoption. You thought at the time you were doing what's best for him. You only wanted him to have everything you couldn't give him . As an adopted child myself only now at age 48 am I beginning to understand why I was gave up for adoption . All circumstances are different. I think you should try and find him and explain to him the facts. You will probably find he has had a good upbringing however he would still like to know where he came from and if anything it will put your mind at rest. Nothing ventured nothing gained.


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*dirtysecret*
post 31st May 2012, 11:56am
Post #22






I was born in 1969, I believe in redlands, thats what I had been told, unfortunately I tried to find records but they proved unfruitful, they say I was not born there.
My mother went into Great Western Road when she was 17, I was conceived on her 17 birthday, there was no way she was allowed to keep me. She gave birth to me and the very same day she left the home. I was put up for foster and adopted by the same loving family - I don't know where I went from Redlands, was never told and both my parents are deceased.
Long story short I found my birth mother, through tracing, my sister actually found me and put me in contact with my mother. Not all rosy Im afraid, no hugs no kisses, no remorse and no answers. Just an empty shell. Worse than I was before I had made contact, I feel anger as I havent been given the answers I so desperately required. :{
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AimeeC
post 20th May 2013, 03:49pm
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Hi Everyone,

My name is Aimee and I am a History student at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

I am doing a research project on Unmarried Motherhood in Post-War Scotland. The study looks at the experiences of unmarried mothers, and the history of mother and baby homes. Currently, no Scottish History has looked into this.

I will be using Oral History, which is the recording of people's memories, experiences and opinions (more about Oral History here - http://www.ohs.org.uk/).

If you would like to help me with this, an oral history interview with me would involve spending as little or as much time as you are comfortable talking about your memories. It will all be confidential.

Please message me on this, or if you wish, we can arrange to chat over email or the phone so I can tell you more about the project and what it would involve if you would like to take part.

I look forward to hearing from you, and really hope you can help me with my history project.

Best wishes,
Aimee
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AimeeC
post 20th May 2013, 03:56pm
Post #24

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QUOTE (*rena* @ 19th Apr 2012, 11:44pm) *
hi, i have been reading all this with interest, i too was sent to the home to have my son born in October 1974 and also worked in the kitchen all the week before Lawrence was born on the Saturday night, a big bouncing 9lb 8oz i went into labour while mopping the floor at the end of my week on kitchen duties. i found this site because i have just been downloading a form to send to the adoption contact register and couldn't remember the name of the home but now recognise the Cleveland part of the address, thank you all for helping me out. I don't know if my son will want to know me after all this time, but my mother who has passed away has sent me a message through a medium my daughter went to see saying i should try and contact him, its not easy. i left the home in a taxi with him to go to central station to catch a train to Kilwinning when he was a few weeks old as i decided not to have him adopted but my dad wouldn't let me take him home, they made arrangements for him to stay in a council home for a while till i tried to get a council house but it never happen in the first year, i could only visit him for a couple of hours on weekend afternoons it broke my heart to see him in a cot or playpen with no company so i gave in and signed the adoption papers when he was nearly a year old to give him a better chance, i fell out with my parents and rebelled and then ran away from home soon after and came down south. he was registered in his dads surname of Cuthbertson as he was named after his little brother but his dad dumped me within a few months. i have shut this out of my mind for years and tried to get on with my life nad now feel so ashamed reading all your stories.


Dear Rena,

I am sorry for your experience, but you should not be ashamed.

My name is Aimee and I am a History student at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

I am doing a research project on Unmarried Motherhood in Post-War Scotland. The study looks at the experiences of unmarried mothers, and the history of mother and baby homes. Currently, no Scottish History has looked into this.

I will be using Oral History, which is the recording of people's memories, experiences and opinions (more about Oral History here - http://www.ohs.org.uk/).

If you would like to help me with this, an oral history interview with me would involve spending as little or as much time as you are comfortable talking about your memories. It will all be confidential.

Please message me on this, or if you wish, we can arrange to chat over email or the phone so I can tell you more about the project and what it would involve if you would like to take part.

Best wishes,
Aimee
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janer
post 28th May 2013, 09:52am
Post #25

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Thank you for the responses, which are so moving. The secrecy and shame surrounding illegitimacy were often more damaging than the illegitimacy itself, it seems to me, and many of you had absolutely no choice but to give up your babies for adoption.

I'm still busy with the book; it won't be finished till Christmas, so if anyone else has stories of the stigma of illegitimacy between 1918 and the 1970s, whether they had, or were themselves, an illegitimate child, so please get in touch. You can find out more about me & the book on jane-robinson.com.

Aimee - very good luck with your research!

Janer.
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Doug1
post 28th May 2013, 10:06am
Post #26


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To auzzieann //

Such a touching and poignant story. So nice of you to share it with us.

Regards


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lesleyw017
post 26th Sep 2013, 06:49pm
Post #27


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I was born in Redlands in 1975. The information here is all I now know on this hospital. I never thought to search it as it no longer existed but I'm glad I did. It was good to read the memories of mothers as it kind of helps me to picture what my birth mum went through, not an easy time for these women & girls, my mum was 16 then. It has also left me with more questions about my early life. As far as I'm aware, I stayed with my mum until I was a year, then my Gran for a few months & was then fostered by my mum's aunt. I don't remember any of that obviously & grew up knowing her as Mum. I don't remember ever being told but always knew I was fostered. I never have got in touch with my birth mum for fear of being rejected again & often wonder if she ever looked for me. I had a social worker until I was 16 so I imagine it would've been quite easy for her to find me. I guess the hard bit is taking the steps to do so. Thanks to all who posted their memories of what must have been the hardest & most heartbreaking time of your life xx


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*thistle66*
post 24th Jun 2016, 09:16am
Post #28






Hi Aussieane, i would have been in Cleveden House, Cleveden Road at the same time as you. My son was born there in 1966. I was asked to leave after we were ordered not to go out for a cigarette break and I refused.

Does anybody know if the house is still there?
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*Guest*
post 24th Aug 2017, 05:59pm
Post #29






QUOTE (auzzieann @ 31st Jul 2010, 11:40pm) *
Hi there TeeHee,

Thanks so much for replying to my post. Way back in the 1960's, it was very shameful to be an unmarried mother, no matter what the circumstances, and I have lived with that shame all of my life. It has taken me all these years to even put my story in writing. I don't think my son will ever come knocking on my door as I emigrated to Australia 29 years ago, which would make it very difficult for him to find me. I'm so sorry to hear you haven't been able to find your birth mum. Were you born in the UK? Surely your foster parents have the details of where you came from! I know you want to respect your parents but I'm sure they would understand. "Jigsaw" is another search name you could try. Whoever your mum is I am sure she would be very proud of you today as you sound a very compassionate and understanding person. Don't stop trying TeeHee, as you never know what tomorrow holds. I wish you all the very best of luck in your search and thank you once again for your kind words.

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