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Glasgow Boards/Forums _ Glasgow News Blog _ Recognition For Wallace Monument

Posted by: GG 2nd Mar 2012, 12:13am

It had long been abandoned by Glasgow City Council (Labour), largely ignored by the Scottish Government (SNP), and belittled by Historic Scotland. Now, however, the huge historical significance of Robroyston in the nation's fight against an oppressive English ruler is beginning to be more widely recognised.

Importantly – as it is aimed at Glasgow children – a new historical guide to the city has highlighted William Wallace on the front cover, and includes coverage of both the Robroyston Wallace Monument and the nearby Wallace's Well.

The inclusion in the children's book is a significant milestone in the promotion of the two historical Glasgow locations, with the monument representing the exact spot where William Wallace was captured in 1305 by the soldiers of a Scottish noble acting on the orders of Edward I.

http://discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/index.php?act=attach&type=post&id=37455 http://discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/index.php?act=attach&type=post&id=37456

Wallace's capture at Robroyston, together with his subsequent trial and brutal execution in London, have long been recognised as among the country's most important historical events. Wallace's death signalled a new era in Scottish resistance which was to pave the way to Robert the Bruce's victory at Bannockburn just nine years later, while the courage and bravery of Wallace after his capture elevated him to the status of national hero.

Although the monument and well had been mostly forgotten (and have been recently threatened with demolition by property developers), both sites have now attracted some investment thanks largely to the efforts of the William Wallace society. Glasgow Guide also set up a http://www.robroyston.org website in 2009 to highlight the dangers posed to the historical sites.

In further good news, the only item remaining in existence thought to have been in the possession of Wallace at the time of his capture at Robroyston – the 'safe transit letter' from King Philip of France – has been returned to Scotland for the first time in over 700 years and will go on display in Edinburgh in the summer.


GG.

 

Posted by: Jim Wilson 2nd Mar 2012, 05:28am

Thanks for keeping me informed in New Zealand of William Wallace. Although we may be far away our Scottish Heritage is still important to me.

Posted by: 0141black 2nd Mar 2012, 08:12am

I always tend to associate Wallace's demise with the Lake of Menteith.

Posted by: john = rmh 2nd Mar 2012, 08:21am

Menteith was the noble who betrayed and captured Wallace.

Posted by: greta 2nd Mar 2012, 08:44am

So pleased to hear about this as I am originally from Robroyston born and bred. My mother and father took us many times to Wallaces Well when we were kids. I remember we used to throw coins into the well and make a wish. Although it is a sad part of our history, it is an important part that we not forget Wallace and his sacrifice. There is no more significant hero than William Wallace in our countries past and it is only right that we keep these peoples history (whether it be happy events or not) alive for future generations. Thank you so much to the Glasgow Guide for keeping this highlighted and us informed. I think the next time I am in Glasgow I will pay a visit to the well and maybe throw in a couple of coins, for old times sake.

Posted by: George Brown 2nd Mar 2012, 10:18am

I always remember my father showing me Wallace's well and telling me the story of it.

I've never been back since and efforts to locate it have failed, but the mental image still remains

Posted by: chas1937 2nd Mar 2012, 10:24am

It's always nice too have some success with these things and so Glad that there are folk out there fighting to save our history

Posted by: Jazzsaxman 2nd Mar 2012, 10:29am

Betrayed by a Scottish nobleman. Some things never change.

Good to hear the monumement has some right and fitting status.

Posted by: andyguinness 2nd Mar 2012, 10:30am

I have been told many years past that the name Robroyston is actually the name given to the area, after the person who betrayed Wallace, his first name was Rau ra, if this is the right way to spell his name.

Therefore the area given to him by the English was called Rauratoun, again, i do not know if this is the correct spelling and over the course of the years it became known as it is now called.

Can anyone verify this or rubbish it?

Posted by: Guest 2nd Mar 2012, 12:01pm

Historic Scotland is correct in its assertion that the Wallace Monument at Robroyston is of little historic significance.

Posted by: *kid diamond* 2nd Mar 2012, 12:07pm

I grew up in Balornock and as kids we would often make the pilgrimage to Wallaces well on our bikes. We didn't know the full history of who William Wallace was at that time just that he was a Scottish hero and that was good enough for us. We felt proud to have such a part of Scottish history on our doorstep and it is fantastic news that this piece of history will be preserved.

Posted by: sleeping warrior 2nd Mar 2012, 12:55pm

This is a great development. As a child some 40+ years ago I first learned of Wallace from a school book . Thereafter my late father expanded my knowledge of Wallace and told me that he had played in the nearby rhubarb fileds as a boy in the 1920's.

For me, the recent refurbishment work has been well done and signifies the importance of the site and the legacy of William Wallace. However, I do regret that the Robroyston monument has been defaced by tributes to a more recent individual albeit that he has raised the profile of Wallace at the same time as his own.

I also regret that neither Mel Gibson nor Randall Wallace who have benefitted considerably from the Braveheart aspect haven't contributed to the development of this site.

Posted by: mlconnelly 2nd Mar 2012, 12:57pm

GG do you know where the book is available. My friends grandson has been learning about William Wallace at school and he would love this, especially as he lives in Colston so not a million miles away from the monument. Mary

Posted by: Ayeyuya 2nd Mar 2012, 01:04pm

More mythical 'Scottish' History, this Country is getting more and more like a Disney Tartan theme park every Year.

Posted by: *Seamus* 2nd Mar 2012, 01:24pm

Great News. I stay nearby to the Well and Monument and have taken my children to tell them the story of Wallace. The Well unfortunately is in a location that is too unsafe to take children as the road is dangerous and no pathway available. Recent refurbishment has been good to see but more development with improved and safe access would be welcome. With the local 'Wallacewell' Primary School only a short distance away, I know that it would be used for the children's field trips when learning about Scotland's and local history. Not to mention the source of the school name.

Posted by: Scotsman 2nd Mar 2012, 01:44pm

When I was at school.... cue violins.... we didnt get much at all about Scottish history like William Wallace, Robert Bruce and Rabbie Burns so I think anything that helps kids learn about the history of their country is a good thing. Who could disagree with that?? Its a great history and one that should make the kids proud of their country and its better than all that tartan and shortbread stuff they try to sell the tourists in Edinburgh.

Come tae Glasgae.... theres culture and history and the best of people!!

Posted by: *Jim of Maryhill* 2nd Mar 2012, 03:55pm

And mind, Glasgow had a history of 1,000 years when snooty Edinburgh was but a wee fort at the foot of yon volcanic plug.

And, nae surprise, Glasgow folk are much more friendly. Glasgow was voted the tops for rest and recuperation by troops of all nations during WW2.

Perhaps the finest history of Wallace to date is James Mackay's WILLIAM WALLACE Braveheart © 1995 some 20 pages of which mention Glasgow in the hero's history.

Jim of Maryhill

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 2nd Mar 2012, 04:29pm

Great news Martin; including the "Safe Transit" letter.

Posted by: okiegal 2nd Mar 2012, 04:35pm

I love everything about GGB. I am so very proud to be SCOTTISH & especially that I was born & bred in GLESGA. I would not trade my raising with anyone in the world. I have been in the States since 1961 & I'm married to an American, my kids were born in America & grandkids also. People ask why don't you become a citizen & I always tell them, I'm GLASGOW born, GLASGOW bred & when I die "No matter where I'm at I'm gonna be GLASGOW dead" You do a great job for GLASGOW by sticking up for what politicians don't seem to care about. Thank you. Okiegal.

Posted by: The Callands Rebel 2nd Mar 2012, 04:38pm

Thanks GG for this update.

Our group here in Southern America enjoy our Scottish Heritage
as well as our own.

Not to repeat but our Camp in glasgow offered numerous times to fund the restoration and monthly maintenance but we got no replies.

I guess the Glasgow Fathers (Council) viewed us as a butt-n-ski
American Capitalist group, but your ancestors though not American are part of our "Civil War Confederate Veterans Organization" as our American ancestors, no more, no less.

It must be catching, that is, the laxidaisical governments attitudes, blights on societies, I say, towards their own historical foundings. No wonder
the world is in turmoil, especially given our "LEADERSHIPS"

SCOTLAND FOR THE SCOTS, AMERICA FOR AMERICANS

LEST WE FORGET

Jerry


Posted by: TeeHeeHee 2nd Mar 2012, 04:39pm

Way to go Okiegal. biggrin.gif

Posted by: frame 2nd Mar 2012, 05:01pm

That's good news, maybe this particular Braveheart can rest a little easier now.. Vive L'cosse

Posted by: *myagnes* 2nd Mar 2012, 05:03pm

QUOTE (Jim Wilson @ 2nd Mar 2012, 04:33am) *
Thanks for keeping me informed in New Zealand of William Wallace. Although we may be far away our Scottish Heritage is still important to me.

Yes William Wallace was a great leader, it's too bad we don't don't have his type today, he led us once, let's hope we can get someone like him to lead us for independence, Scotland Forever, Let Glasgow Florish!

Posted by: *Duncan* 2nd Mar 2012, 07:35pm

QUOTE (*Jim of Maryhill* @ 2nd Mar 2012, 03:00pm) *
And mind, Glasgow had a history of 1,000 years when snooty Edinburgh was but a wee fort at the foot of yon volcanic plug.

And, nae surprise, Glasgow folk are much more friendly. Glasgow was voted the tops for rest and recuperation by troops of all nations during WW2.

Perhaps the finest history of Wallace to date is James Mackay's WILLIAM WALLACE Braveheart 1995 some 20 pages of which mention Glasgow in the hero's history.

Jim of Maryhill

Are you serious? Mackay was done twice for plagiarism of 2 Pulitzer Prize winning books. His book on Wallace is a travesty of what little we know of the man, full of erroneous information & fiction. He also had a dodgy background stealing priceless stamps from the British Museum & selling them to collectors.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_A._Mackay

Posted by: Grampar 2nd Mar 2012, 08:39pm

So much for peoples efforts over the centuries to maintain our Scots identity when you get so many so called Scots ranting about how unimportant the Wallace Well monument is. I for one believe it is important to maintain our connections with our past for the benefit of our children and grandchildren. I have stopped visiting the G.G. as I find so many of your regular contributors tend to trivialize every subject and use the discussion board as a place to score points of one and other. So farewell my fellow Glaswegians at home, in Scotland, and abroad. Sad to say I won't really miss you. Nor, I suspect, many of you; me.

Posted by: bobbystevenson 2nd Mar 2012, 11:50pm

Delighted that something has at last been done to highlight Wallaces Well and Monument. I often cycled there from Auchinloch where I was brought up as a boy. I was apalled to see the poor state of the well, and the close proximity of the houses surrounding the monument on my last visit. I now live in Ayr where millions have been spent by The National Trust on a new museum to Rabbie Burns. A bit over the top, but what a contrast!

Bobby Stevenson

Posted by: GG 3rd Mar 2012, 02:27pm

QUOTE (Guest @ 2nd Mar 2012, 11:06am) *
Historic Scotland is correct in its assertion that the Wallace Monument at Robroyston is of little historic significance.

No-one, not even Historic Scotland, disputes the historical significance of the Robroyston Wallace Monument as marking the site of the barn where Wallace lost his freedom. In this country though, such significance does not guarantee either protection or respect.

Where myself and historial experts (I am not an expert) disagree with Historic Scotland is in the historical significance of Wallace's Well.

From the http://robroyston.orgsite:
QUOTE
In a very worrying revelation, The Sunday Herald reveals that Wallace's Well, which has been "quietly stripped of its protected status six years ago, could be faced with destruction". The article continues: "The Scottish William Wallace Society has claimed that the removal of the well's listed status was never properly publicised, and that as a result the site may be erased by housing development without the chance for anyone to protest". The decision that the 'B'-listed well site, just half a mile from the Robroyston Wallace Monument that signifies the place where Wallace was captured in 1305, was deemed "of little historical interest" was taken in 1993 by Historic Scotland and supported by Glasgow City Council.

A spokesman for Historic Scotland confirmed that Wallace's Well was no longer B-listed as a site of 'regional or more than local importance' under new guidelines. According to the HS spokesman, the swell site could not be "substantiated with any evidence". Responding, Dr Gilbert Bell, the curator at Springburn Museum and a local Robroyston historian, was contemptuous of the reasons for dropping the well's listed status when he says: "If Wallace stayed in the house, that's where he would drink from. All over Scotland there are Wallace wells and Wallace leaps, but this site is not disputed as he was captured there. The site is every bit as important as Bannockburn and is part of Scotland's high road to independence". (Source: The Sunday Herald, August 29, 1999)

I think if we look at http://www.robroyston.org/wallace_robroyston_developments.html in the last twenty years (and what is planned for the near future), we will be able to be able to deduce another scenario for the removal of the 'protected status' from Wallace's Well.

GG.

Posted by: GG 4th Mar 2012, 12:52pm

QUOTE (andyguinness @ 2nd Mar 2012, 09:35am) *
I have been told many years past that the name Robroyston is actually the name given to the area, after the person who betrayed Wallace, his first name was Rau ra, if this is the right way to spell his name.

Therefore the area given to him by the English was called Rauratoun, again, i do not know if this is the correct spelling and over the course of the years it became known as it is now called.

Can anyone verify this or rubbish it?

Andy, regarding the origin of the name of Robroyston, I have also read/heard that it is a linguistic corruption of the original name for the area: Rab Rae's Toon. Apparently, Rab Rae being a prominent landowner at one time.

Some sources say that Wallace was staying on a farm belonging to Rab Rae when he was captured, and that Rae betrayed Wallace to Sir John de Menteith, a Scottish nobleman who had pledged to serve Edward Longshanks. Personally, I don't think that a farmer could have so quickly informed Menteith of Wallace's location. Remember that Wallace had been on the run from the most powerful man in Europe for many years, so it is highly unlikely that he would have announced his arrival at the farm in advance. After he arrived, he would have made sure that the farmer would have had little or no opportunity to communicate Wallace's whereabouts. In addition, although Wallace travelled relatively lightly, such was Wallace's reputation that Menteith would have had to have prepared a mobile and heavily-armed force to capture Wallace at short notice.

My thoughts are that Wallace was betrayed by either (i) Bishop Wishart of Glasgow (the Robroyston farmland belonged to the clergy), or (ii) Robert Bruce, the future king of Scotland, who was later to give substantial land to Menteith. Quite possibly, he was betrayed by both these very powerful men who would have believed that Wallace was both an obstacle to their own ambitions and to the best interests of Scotland at that time.

GG.

Posted by: GG 4th Mar 2012, 07:34pm

... seen from the geopolitical perspective of the Middle Ages, of course, if Wishart or Bruce had 'betrayed' Wallace, they would not have see it as a betrayal. Rather, they would have viewed it as a sacrifice worth making to give the Scottish prelates and magnates time to further the strategic cause of independence given that Edward I would not bargain while Wallace still a free man.

Some authors have postulated that Wallace's refusal to compromise and negotiate on the central issues associated with Scottish independence made the commoner a less effective political leader. Not surprisingly, it is Wallace's refusal to compromise and bargain that have made him such an outstanding national hero.

GG.

Posted by: wee davy 4th Mar 2012, 08:28pm

Bishop Wishart has long been my own 'favourite' with respect to Willie's subsequent demise - although I certainly agree with you regards the political expediency, GG.

Whoever did it, was sure to have been paid handsomely.

What IS for sure monument or no. Wallace will forever be synonymous with Scotland. Personally, having read extensively on various pontifications
- my firm view is,

1) He was always going to come to a bad end
2) He lives on in the beating heart of every true Scot
3) His legend is much MUCH better than King Arthur's lol

Posted by: weebren3 4th Mar 2012, 10:28pm

Thank you for posting,you just made me even more proud of Wallace,our history no scots should forget. Now everyone get there history books out and read to the children. I read what people had to say,I could not believe so many people dont recall to much regarding this history. Thanks Martin for posting and starting this site,your A great scots too,at least you did not forget. Your appreciated. rolleyes.gif

Posted by: Guest 5th Mar 2012, 10:39am

QUOTE (GG @ 4th Mar 2012, 06:39pm) *
... seen from the geopolitical perspective of the Middle Ages, of course, if Wishart or Bruce had 'betrayed' Wallace, they would not have see it as a betrayal. Rather, they would have viewed it as a sacrifice worth making to give the Scottish prelates and magnates time to further the strategic cause of independence given that Edward I would not bargain while Wallace still a free man.

Some authors have postulated that Wallace's refusal to compromise and negotiate on the central issues associated with Scottish independence made the commoner a less effective political leader. Not surprisingly, it is Wallace's refusal to compromise and bargain that have made him such an outstanding national hero.

GG.

Based on what historical evidence? This "opinion" I have never seen postulated by any historian I have encountered on reading any text extant to this period of Scottish and or English history.

Quote sources and I will stand corrected.

Posted by: wee davy 5th Mar 2012, 01:34pm

Welcome guest
It is clear you are well read in the matter of 'oor wullie' - however I think GG was quite clear when discussing the many theories which you know, are LEGION.

Why not join our happy (legend has it, mostly)little band, and you can be FULLY integrated within our musings.##

Old Blind Harry has a LOT to answer for - don't you wish you had a time machine sometimes?

Hope you will consider joining.

Regards, wee davy

Posted by: GG 5th Mar 2012, 08:48pm

QUOTE (Guest @ 5th Mar 2012, 09:44am) *
QUOTE
Some authors have postulated that Wallace's refusal to compromise and negotiate on the central issues associated with Scottish independence made the commoner a less effective political leader. Not surprisingly, it is Wallace's refusal to compromise and bargain that have made him such an outstanding national hero.

GG.

Based on what historical evidence? This "opinion" I have never seen postulated by any historian I have encountered on reading any text extant to this period of Scottish and or English history.

Quote sources and I will stand corrected.

Thanks wee davy, yes I'd also encourage anyone to join our happy band!

I think it's a perfectly logical hypothesis to develop, particularly with respect to Wallace's unstinting loyalty to Balliol, whom many of the prelates (Wishart certainly, Lamberton perhaps) and magnates (Bruce and Comyn being the most powerful) thought unfit to restore to the head of an independent Scottish nation. In refusing to veer from his extraordinary devotion to 'Toom Tabard', Wallace lost the opportunity to make powerful allies in former Guardians who would subsequently 'change side' and occupy important positions in Edward's government of occupation. If Wallace had compromised his position he may not have felt compelled/forced to resign his Guardianship after defeat at Falkirk. (Indeed, with the full loyalty of the magnates it might be have been possible for Wallace to have been victorious against a withering, but still immensely powerful, English army in 1298!?)

Of course, that's my opinion only. In terms of such a hypothesis having been postulated by historians ... I would say that it is a persistent theme (sometimes underlying) in Andrew Fisher's excellent biography of Wallace. Also, although it's a few years since reading, I think Chris Brown would not have been averse to taking up such theorising (though I cannot be sure).

I can't find the exact passage in Fisher which first prompted my memory, however, on re-reading the conclusion, I found the following on page 258:

QUOTE
It is too readily forgotten that had Wallace survived Edward I and lived to witness an independent Scotland, it would have been as an opponent of Bruce; Balliol's man, Wallace, would not have changed his allegiance.

From this we can see that the author believes that Bruce must have viewed Wallace as a potential threat, almost certainly undermining the support of the powerful Annandale clan.

GG.

Posted by: GG 5th Mar 2012, 08:57pm

That said, it is also my opinion that Wallace's loyalty and devotion – amongst many other qualities – propel him to the apex of national heroes!

GG.

Posted by: stratson 5th Mar 2012, 09:54pm

I heartily concur!!!

Posted by: angel 5th Mar 2012, 10:36pm


I recall reading a number of years ago , an article , saying that the great Robert the Bruce was no where to be found when Wallace needed his help , that would have interfered with Bruce's plans of being King .
" So Wallace was the sacrificial lamb "


Posted by: Heather 6th Mar 2012, 12:15am

Weebren, I couldn't help laughing when I read about you saying get the History books out and read to the children.
It reminded me of when my g'son was only about one year old and I was baby sitting as my son and his wife were out for the night. My son phoned to see how the baby was and I told him I was reading him the story of William Wallace, he burst out laughing. When they came home he told me his wife and friends all had a good laugh when he told them what I was reading to the baby. laugh.gif

Posted by: GG 6th Mar 2012, 12:57am

QUOTE (angel @ 5th Mar 2012, 09:41pm) *
I recall reading a number of years ago , an article , saying that the great Robert the Bruce was no where to be found when Wallace needed his help , that would have interfered with Bruce's plans of being King .

"So Wallace was the sacrificial lamb "

Angel, not only was Bruce frequently nowhere to be found, he was often plotting against the best intentions that Wallace had for his beloved Scotland. There's a note in Andrew Fisher's biography of Wallace (mentioned above) that says it all:

QUOTE
There are certain periods of Bruce's career which pose difficulties even for the most dedicated of his [Bruce's] biographers. If Falkirk is perhaps the most obvious of these, his actions after Irvine [a humiliating Scottish defeat] remain unclear also. ...

GG.

Posted by: GG 6th Mar 2012, 12:59am

QUOTE (Heather @ 5th Mar 2012, 11:20pm) *
Weebren, I couldn't help laughing when I read about you saying get the History books out and read to the children.
It reminded me of when my g'son was only about one year old and I was baby sitting as my son and his wife were out for the night. My son phoned to see how the baby was and I told him I was reading him the story of William Wallace, he burst out laughing. When they came home he told me his wife and friends all had a good laugh when he told them what I was reading to the baby. laugh.gif

Heather, I honestly believe that you could not get a better role model for a boy on any page of any book ever written than William Wallace ... just don't get him a sword from the pound shop! smile.gif

GG.

Posted by: angel 6th Mar 2012, 05:27am

Martin , I took a little refresher course this evening on the.
Battle of Falkirk smile.gif
Wallace was not only fighting the English , He was also fighting a more dangerous enemy , his own kind and because of this , the battle for him became an excercise in futility.
Also , it is very likely that he did fall into a deep depession and with the help of friends , managed to escape to Europe .

Posted by: JAGZ1876 6th Mar 2012, 08:27am

QUOTE (angel @ 6th Mar 2012, 04:32am) *
He was also fighting a more dangerous enemy , his own kind


I know the feeling Angel tongue.gif

Posted by: Heather 6th Mar 2012, 04:24pm

No fear of that GG, the g'son is 20 yrs old now. laugh.gif

It was not a Historical Novel I was reading to the g'son it was a childs book which gave a brief history of which ever character the book was about.
It was one of many I used to buy for my son when he was young. I think they were called 'Ladybird Books' and my son had a lot of them as I believe in reading to children as it encourages them to read when they are older.

Posted by: Archie 6th Mar 2012, 11:22pm

I used to go when I was younger and we stayed in Barmulloch. Nice to see that something is being done to help the site stay in good working order. Places like this need to be protected for future generations. Thanks.

Posted by: TeeHeeHee 7th Mar 2012, 12:11am

QUOTE (Heather @ 6th Mar 2012, 03:29pm) *
... I think they were called 'Ladybird Books' ...

They are. I'm nearly finished Book 5 now. tongue.gif

Posted by: RonD 7th Mar 2012, 01:19pm

We often walked to Wallace's Well on a Sunday evening in the summer from Auchinairn when I was small. I remember looking down and feeling a little sad that someone had thrown an empty cigarette package down into it. I knew about Wallace by then since we had taken him at School. I loved and still love history and remember learning a lot of Scottish history at primary school. In today's terms Wallace and his band would been known as one cause altruistic agitators while the other key players such as Bruce et al were they corporate executives who vacillated in their loyalties in order gain the best for them selves at any particular time. Bruce went back and forth in his "loyalty" to Edward the 1st, one time being his man and other making a bid as a competitor for the Scottish crown.

I am truly a proud Scot but I try not to assert my Scottishness on not being English however, Wallace was in a time when England was the enemy and he was instrumental in gaining Scotland's independence as a martyr for that cause. I think that Scotland has too much history and my not appreciate that something that happened some 700 years needs to be cherished at least maintained for future generations, the well is one such monument. I have said this on other posts I don't understand with so much concern why a motivated group could not further its cause and maintenance. There must be enough like minded souls in Glasgow and environs to do this.

I'm sure that ex pats like myself would throw in a quid or two for such a project.

Posted by: Scotsman 7th Mar 2012, 05:25pm

Well said Ron.... I agree that our monuments and famous places should be preserved and cherished for future generations to share and enjoy and puzzle over. Only in Scotland do you see the dodgy land developers demolishing our national heritage and the powers that be dont just look on but encourage it!!

Once these historical monuments and places are gone - they are GONE!!

Posted by: *Bernard* 8th Mar 2012, 04:56pm

Good news's all these historic site's should be maintained by the government and if Scotland go independent we need these statues instead of demolishing them, get the builder why if they cant afford to maintain all the outlying monuments why don't they transfer the monument to St Georges square in the centre of Glasgow and it would be seen by all tourists and can go to the local library and read the full story behind the statue.

Posted by: GG 13th Mar 2012, 08:10pm

By continuing to reject its association with William Wallace, Glasgow may miss out on spin-off benefits associated with a major TV series being planned about the life of our most famous national hero:

QUOTE
A drama series on the life of William Wallace is being developed by STV Productions in association with Digital Rights Group, Nine/8 Entertainment and Creative Media. "Wallace" will focus on the backstory of its central figure, his years spent attempting to unify Scotland, his major battles and his personal life. "This was a turbulent time in Scotland's history, in which William Wallace had a starring and pivotal role," STV content director Alan Clements said. "We plan to delve deep into his character and explore his passions, bringing parts of history to life in a spectacular and raw depiction. With all eyes on Scotland in the current political climate, this also seems to be a very appropriate time to tell this story in more depth." ...

Full story here:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/sns-201203121615reedbusivarietynvr1118051350mar12,0,6059003.story

It's set to air in 2014, just in time for the Scottish referendum!

GG.

Posted by: GG 13th Mar 2012, 08:30pm

... and 2014 is also the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn:


GG.

Posted by: angel 13th Mar 2012, 08:44pm

I do hope that we in Canada get the opportunity to see this series ,
especially if the truth will be told about the political scene in Scotland
during the lifetime of William Wallace .

Posted by: GG 13th Mar 2012, 09:14pm

Hi Angel, I think there will be wide distribution, especially where there is a strong Scottish expatriate community, so you should be in with a good chance.

Regarding the political scene, I have have to say that the scene then makes today's political shenanigans look like mere nursery play ... and that is saying something! With very few exceptions (and I'm thinking at a stretch Oliphant and the Frasers), every single 'noble' abandoned Wallace to the might and mercy of Edward I after the same nobles had sided with Edward. Not one noble (or clergyman) made any representation to Longshanks - following the treaty of Strathord in 1304 - to forgive or be merciful with Wallace. He as on his own!

If anything, the king of England proved himself to be more noble than the entire Scottish nobility, as he was brave, determined and loyal to his country (though he was also bitter, vengeful and very vindictive). He was no Wallace, of course, as he commanded the most formidable army in Europe, while Wallace started from very humble beginnings to ultimately defeat that army on the battlefield.

GG.

Posted by: angel 14th Mar 2012, 01:33am

Yes Martin , Wallace was most definatey on his own , so many hippocrites , yes , even traitors looking to feather their own nest and to hell with Scottish independence .... And now , in the 21st century , has that attitude changed , I'm not so sure , I think that , "hung drawn and quartered ", still excists but in some other form or an other , as does treachery .

Posted by: kenb 14th Mar 2012, 02:46am

well said angel tongue.gif

Posted by: HH 13th Apr 2012, 08:52am

I am Egyptian. I am so happy that there is awaking of recognition for William Wallace the great Hero of Scotland. We have great admiration and respect for him in my country. I am planning to visit his monument while I shall be in Glasgow soon. It shall be a visit from Tahrir square to the memory of that great hero.

Posted by: wellfield 14th Apr 2012, 10:02pm

QUOTE (HH @ 13th Apr 2012, 01:57am) *
I am Egyptian. I am so happy that there is awaking of recognition for William Wallace the great Hero of Scotland. We have great admiration and respect for him in my country. I am planning to visit his monument while I shall be in Glasgow soon. It shall be a visit from Tahrir square to the memory of that great hero.

Hope you have a wonderful trip!!

Posted by: wombat 14th Apr 2012, 10:26pm

QUOTE (HH @ 13th Apr 2012, 09:57am) *
I am Egyptian. I am so happy that there is awaking of recognition for William Wallace the great Hero of Scotland. We have great admiration and respect for him in my country. I am planning to visit his monument while I shall be in Glasgow soon. It shall be a visit from Tahrir square to the memory of that great hero.

rolleyes.gif is your mummy comin with yie "HH" ? tongue.gif

Posted by: wee davy 15th Apr 2012, 08:13pm

wombat, you continue to be incorrigable!
He better hiv his mammie wie him - he'll need her tae find the monument! rolleyes.gif

Posted by: wombat 15th Apr 2012, 10:07pm

yes.gif

Posted by: Scotsman 16th Apr 2012, 03:21pm

Well said HH.... have a great trip and I am sure your visit will go well!!

Posted by: annemac 5th Sep 2012, 02:41pm

I'm in Robroyston on holiday from Wales again so I've just taken a wee walk along to the monument from my daughters house & was pleasantly surprised. The last time I visited it was in a terrible state with broken paving, builders rubbish etc. it's been nicely landscaped with a wooden bench & an information board. I didnt venture as far as the well but weather permitting, I'll walk there on Sunday. Can't do it sooner as we're off to Inverness tomorrow. I did take a couple of photos but can't figure out how to post them on here. I'll try again when I'm home next week at my pc instead of an iPad!

Posted by: Duns Stoshious 18th Sep 2012, 09:55am

QUOTE (*Bernard* @ 8th Mar 2012, 06:11pm) *
Good news's all these historic site's should be maintained by the government and if Scotland go independent we need these statues instead of demolishing them, get the builder why if they cant afford to maintain all the outlying monuments why don't they transfer the monument to St Georges square in the centre of Glasgow and it would be seen by all tourists and can go to the local library and read the full story behind the statue.

"need these statues if Scotland go independant"?? Need statues of Victoria Empress of India and Victoria's beloved Albert who hardly spoke English never mind Glesga'??