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> Glasgow: Worst Schools In Britain?, City bottom of UK qualifications league
GG
post 18th Jan 2012, 10:53pm
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Evening Times, 15th December 2011:
QUOTE
Glasgow has slumped back to the bottom of the school exam league tables after rising from last place for the first time in 2010.

Last year pupils Higher exam results lifted Glasgow from the basement spot, closing the attainment gap between the city and the rest of Scotland. ... But this year Glasgow is back in last place with just 7% of pupils passing five or more Highers in fifth year compared to 12% nationally.

Evening Times, 18th January 2012: Education spokeswoman:
QUOTE
"[Glasgow's] schools are improving year on year in terms of our increase in pupils' outcomes and exam results and on raising attainment.

We have entered a new era of attainment and success in Glasgow and our plan is to build on this and continue to improve in all aspects of education services."

GG.


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Alex MacPhee
post 18th Jan 2012, 11:02pm
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I guess when you're at the bottom, the only way is up!


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GG
post 18th Jan 2012, 11:27pm
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smile.gif

I think I feel a song coming on...

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Melody
post 19th Jan 2012, 10:08am
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laugh.gif Go for it Martin.
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*Dunn Shtosius*
post 20th Jan 2012, 02:17am
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QUOTE (gedboy @ 26th Sep 2011, 09:07am) *
As a teacher in Glasgow perhaps I can add some experience to the debate.

Currently I am teaching in a North East Glasgow Secondary. It is easily the best school in which I have ever worked in my thirty years of paid employment. The success is down to many things, including:

1) Fantastic discipline from the Headteacher down: no homework, too much make-up or a poorly knotted tie are seen as only slightly less appalling than murder. This leaves me to get on with teaching. In other Glasgow schools I have utilised the psychological skills of a nightclub bouncer to get me through the day and done almost no teaching.

2) Supportive parents who clearly discipline their kids, telling them that schools and teachers are brilliant. The school clearly has very many poor pupils, as it takes in kids from five of the fifty poorest areas in Britain, including the poorest. However, the acceptance that the teacher is right is a principle I thought I would never see again in my working lifetime.

As a confirmed Socialist, I am firm in my understanding that poverty begets educational failure, though only to a point. I have suffered kids and parents who are aggressive in their rejection of education and do everything in their power every second of the day to prevent others learning. I have watched as kids pretended to be of low intelligence so they did not get battered. In doing so they sabotaged their own lives. However, for reasons which are not clear to me, nobody takes these parents to task.

I'm a good teacher, but I do not kid myself. Research suggests that my influence over the children is about 3%. The vast majority of attitudes and behaviours comes from parents and 'significant adults' in the family group. My kids love my lessons because they have been programmed to think teachers are great.

I could get a chicken with a limp through many exams, if only the kids do as I tell them, but this does not happen in most schools. With no home support I am dead in the water. People who don't teach possibly have a Mr Chips approach to teaching where the good teacher persuades the uninterested kid to shine. Wipe that from your mind right now.

I stupidly thought that if only I worked harder I could interest the kids and trust me, my lessons are often a hair's breadth away from cabaret. Boring I am not, but I had to admit defeat when I was puking up with stress before I went to school and then puking in the toilets before my first lesson/battle of the day.

One last comment: in the days of industry in Glasgow, the low ability kids would have ready made jobs requiring almost no written or mathematical skills in the factories of the East End. Those jobs are long gone. What do we now do with those children - who will not pass exams after their fifteenth birthdays no matter how hard they (and I) try? This is a debate that has not been started because there is an insane belief that you can keep on improving in every subject.

If only.

As an ex teacher I can sympathise with certain comments from the above. Mainly motivation. If the parents have no motivation in any direction or commitment to their kids education, then no matter the ability of the teacher, there will be no achievable outcomes. I had enviable discipline in my classes but to achieve a 20min. window of positive delivery in any period was a victory of high proportions. the class dynamics play a great part in the educational outcomes. I saw in my final weeks as a teacher, the teacher I regarded as the best in the school, have a failure rate of 57% of a class he had spoon fed the exam to over a month. They just did not care whether they passed or not. I also choose for ethical reasons to teach in the poorest of schools; the price paid was hardly worth it.
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backcauseway
post 21st Jan 2012, 05:06pm
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The Evening Times should perhaps be renamed Glasgow Pravda. It seems full of Glasgow City Council publicity now. Mr Mathieson has something in it virtually every day. Despite millions being spent the truth is the results are not better as far as education is concerned. No matter what PR stuff the council come out with. Was the introduction of comprehensive education the start of the downward tend in Scottish education? Was The scrapping of the Allan Glens of this world another bad idea?
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*essex guy*
post 19th Jun 2012, 07:21am
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I went to school in Calton and Easterhouse. They were never really interested in teaching us anything except to sit down and keep quite or else we would be belted. What way is that to treat children? Could have been so much better. And still looks like things are still much the same.
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Dexter St. Clair
post 23rd Jan 2013, 06:19pm
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QUOTE
School is awarded 'outstanding' inspection report


St Andrew's, in Carntyne, Glasgow, which serves some of the poorest postcodes in the UK, such as Easterhouse, Cranhill, Ruchazie and Shettleston, was awarded three "excellent" ratings by inspectors and two "very goods".

It also serves a couple of almost affluent areas as well but all children and staff should be congratulated.

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Dimairt
post 23rd Jan 2013, 06:27pm
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QUOTE (Dexter St. Clair @ 23rd Jan 2013, 07:36pm) *
St Andrew's, in Carntyne, Glasgow, which serves some of the poorest postcodes in the UK, such as Easterhouse, Cranhill, Ruchazie and Shettleston, was awarded three "excellent" ratings by inspectors and two "very goods".

It also serves a couple of almost affluent areas as well but all children and staff should be congratulated.

I tried to post a link to this article yesterday, so will just agree with Dexter here. There are a lot of good news stories about Glasgow's schools, we just don't get to hear them.

Does that mean ignoring the bad ones? Of course not but let's celebrate St Andrew's achievment here and also that of Sgoil Ghaidhlig Ghlaschu, the Sports School at Bellahouston, the Dance School at Knightswood ...... add your own.

Durachdan,

Eddy
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*Jimmyboy*
post 24th Jan 2013, 09:24am
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I went to school in St. Anthony's in Govan and St. Gerard's in the 50s. The teachers were second to none, except when it came to humanity and the education I received at St. Gerards was as sound as any in the U.K. The school however like all others fell to the degeneracy of political and social correctness and instead of qualifying to go to that establishment, and this includes all other secondary schools in Scotland, it became a 'comprehensive school" allowing all and sundry, getting right down to those who couldn't even read or write to a satisfactory level, becoming a no go area for learning. Where once working class kids from all areas of Glasgow once could have a shot at a top class education where the school uniform and badge were worn with pride, it became the school you would not send your kids any where near. Blame the pseudo socialist politicians and their leveling experiments that became total failures due to the fact that in intelligence there exists no equality that will lend itself to measurement, but only in opportunity to rise to highest level of achievement can equality exist.
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Dexter St. Clair
post 28th Jan 2013, 11:56pm
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I thought St. Mungo's Academy creamed off the best pupils from all over Glasgow.
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Isobel
post 29th Jan 2013, 03:57am
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Its very sad to read through these posts. I can remember in my primary school the head going to London to receive some sort of honour for having the highest number of children in Britain passing their 11 + in five consecutive years. I think her name was sister Loyola.Although the school was in Riddrie many kids attended from Dennistoun ,Ruchazie and Carntyne.The so called poor area's.Mind you back then we did have respect for teachers. Woo betide the kid who spoke in class.It was way to strict but it has gone far to much the other way.I find it really hard to believe the schools in Glasgow are the lowest in GB. Surely not.


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wee davy
post 29th Jan 2013, 05:24am
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QUOTE (Dexter St. Clair @ 29th Jan 2013, 12:13am) *
I thought St. Mungo's Academy creamed off the best pupils from all over Glasgow.

Care to elucidate (in respect of the Topic context), Dexter (being a former pupil)?


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zascot
post 29th Jan 2013, 09:25am
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QUOTE (Dexter St. Clair @ 29th Jan 2013, 01:13am) *
I thought St. Mungo's Academy creamed off the best pupils from all over Glasgow.

They got my older brother but they did`nt get me, which proves your thoughts wrong. wink.gif biggrin.gif


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Heather
post 29th Jan 2013, 11:48am
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It's true that there is little respect for Teachers nowadays.
Just a few days ago I was telling my two g'daughters how strict Teachers were in my day, and we even got lines if we went to School not wearing our School uniform.

If my mum had heard that I was cheeky to a Teacher I would have got a cuff on the ear.
I know some Teachers in my day were really hard on children and I had one who should never have been allowed in a classroom, she was a monster Teaching in the Infant School.

My son' Primary Education was in Easterhouse and it never stopped him from going on to University as did many of his generation whose Primary and Secondary Education was in Easterhouse.
I know two girls born, bred and Educated in Easterhouse who are University Professors. Many more who became Teachers, Nurse's Accountants etc. So it's not always the Teachers to blame, some parents never bothered to teach their children respect.

Discipline should begin in the home, not the School.



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