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> The Blitz Or World War Two, Memories of the times
Mary48
post 10th Dec 2003, 01:44pm
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Mamie, I was brought up just down the road from you in Larkie..G'day:)


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*LEWIS MCNIVEN*
post 19th Apr 2007, 08:40pm
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QUOTE (Fearn @ 7th Dec 2003, 11:32 PM) *
I remember my 'job' when the siren went - get dressed and take the dogs (we had Scotties) to the shelter at the bottom of the garden - no questions asked! Warm clothing was laid out each night and I think there were thermos bottles and food left handy on the kitchen table. I did my thing and, in a top bunk, with the dogs, snuggled down. A good sleeper, I guess I slept through most of the raids and then went safely back to bed. Far enough East of Clydebank we were lucky although there were several big hunks of shrapnel found in ours and other gardens.

Years later I met a gal who had difficulty walking, as a tiny babe she had lost 4 toes from one foot as her mother dangled her on her lap during a Clydebank raid.

For sure makes you realize just how lucky so many of us were!
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frankd2
post 23rd Feb 2008, 02:23pm
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What is for you will not go past you!
I am a great believer in that old saying.
Living 500 yards from Blochairn steelworks throughout the war one would expect to be bombed out but happily that was not to happen to me or my pals.
My parents never took our family to the air raid shelters on the spare ground at Sannox Gardens next to our home at Crinan Street.
They either had a death wish or thought that the tenement building was as safe as any air raid shelter.
We children had a wonderful time during the war. If we were'nt picking up pieces of shrapnel we were collecting pieces of barrage balloon silk which we took home to be used as a table cover.
What a wonderful occasion it was when Victory in Europe night came along.
A massive bonfire was started in the spare ground (stolen paddle boats from Alexandra Park- not a nice thing to happen but nobody cared) and dancing in the streets.
A wonderful time for an 11 year old and his pals.
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backcauseway
post 10th Feb 2009, 02:21pm
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I recall in March 1943 my dad was away and my mum was asleep and the sirens went. I recall running out into my street in Glasgow, we lived in a place called Drumchapel at the time, to watch the planes. How crazy to think of it now. The German planes were very low and the local ack ack guns started firing. The shrapnel and stuff started falling and broke slates and some glass. I remember picking up this shrapnel and nearly getting my figures burnt off it was so hot. We used to take bits into school to swop or show off!! Next day looking for shrapnel was what we did.
These German planes made a distinctive noise compare to the British ones. I can still recall their noise. Does anyone elso recall their distiinctive noise?
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stratson
post 10th Feb 2009, 05:10pm
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I do indeed remember the German planes noise, it was most distinctive>>>>a repetitive drone. mad.gif


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TeeHeeHee
post 10th Feb 2009, 05:56pm
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My old man was a First Aider with the ARP ( air raid precaution) and travelled from Blantyre into Glasgow before the night time raids. The stories he had to tell were horific but there was always something humorous to relate too. He also told us of the big oil drums set alight along the Clyde way way out of town to mislead the germany bombers, who followed the river to their targets by night, and get them to waste their bombs out in the country. We had a big anti aircraft battery outside the door over the fence in an adjacent feild. My 10 year older brother remembers it but I was born in '44 so just remember the stories.


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klingon
post 7th Jul 2009, 03:12pm
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QUOTE (wee mags @ 23rd Nov 2003, 02:31am) *
I remember the prisoners of war only they were down Kelvindale rd across from the railroad also across from Gairbraid place where the buses used to stop over,my mammy said not to say bad things to the prisoners as they were some ones father,brother,son,or husband and we had a brother and would we like if he was taunted? one used to call me liepshien I dont know how to spell it,


"Leibchen"-is German for loved one-basically the sojer was calling you darling!-poor bugger was probably comparing you to a wee sister or mebbe a daughter-they wern't all child bayoneting nazi monsters-just guys fighting for their country like our boys-we all had ma's and da's-no matter what nationality we were.


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27stowst
post 7th Jul 2009, 04:52pm
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A lot of them were conscripts like our boys too. Cannon fodder. sad.gif


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Rab-oldname
post 7th Jul 2009, 06:45pm
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Many years after the war I met a couple who had lived in Clydebank.The man told me an incredible story of the evening they were strolling through the town during the war when the sirens warned of an air-raid. Before they could get to a shelter, the bombers were dropping their load along the street and they tried to get shelter in the deep entrance of a ladies outfitters. A bomb landed nearby and the man described being picked up by the blast and blown yards away from his wife and he lost consciousness. When he came to, he found bodies of dead and injured all over the street, but it wasn't as bad as it looked, as many 'bodies' were dummies from the shop display. He was horrified to see the complete shop front was demolished and he began to search for his wife. She had been wearing a bright green coat and shoes and he suddenly saw the coat and shoes lying under a blanket placed by the wardens. The warden stopped him looking at his wife and he said she had been 'cut to pieces' by shop window plate- glass. The poor man was so distraught that he went into a kind of daze and he told me he just wandered around the town for a whole day and night not knowing where he was going. Eventually, he found himself slowly walking over the canal bridge when he saw a woman in a dirty, torn green coat, covered in dust with dirty green shoes walking towards him in a kind of daze. Yes, it was his wife, who had also been told that her husband had been blown to bits and she had suffered the traumatic experience just as he had. What a happy ending to an amazing story.
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TeeHeeHee
post 7th Jul 2009, 11:50pm
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Truly amazing story Rab. Just had to be retold.


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Lizziehen
post 14th Aug 2009, 12:45am
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I have memories of the war. My mother had been serously ill about three years earlier and we had moved to my grandparents home in Springboig. She must have been bad for my father to move in with his father-in-law, the two of them too much of a kind! I remember sitting beside my parents as they listened to the radio when war was declared, not understanding why my Mum was crying. Two months later she gave birth to my brother and soon after that we moved to Springboig while my grandparents and aunt moved to Dunoon, to escape the bombing. I remember the first air raid and my Dad lifting me out of bed and carrying me downstairs, putting me and my wee brother beneath their heavy oak table.

Then we had an Anderson air raid shelter in our back garden, and my mother made it into a wee home with carpets, chairs, two cots for my brother and I. One night I awoke, the door was open, I could see fire and I stood in the large cot screaming my head off as my parents were not in the shelter. Don't know what caused the fire in the garden of a house nearby, an incendiary bomb? Everyone had rushed out of their shelters to put the fire out. My father suddenly appeared and with an odd sense of humour said something about Hitler coming, and thereafter I lived in fear of Hitler invading Glasgow. He had a large map on the kitchen wall with little flags of different colours for the Germans and the Allies which fascinated me, and I helped him move the flags. The German flags seemed to be coming closer and closer to the coast and I still feel the fear I felt that Hitler would invade us. Dad was great at answering all my many questions but perhaps some of his information was too much for a very young highly imaginative wee lassie!

To his bitter disappointment my Dad was exempt from the forces as he was a baker, worked with the UCBS in McNeil Street (?) and throughout the war worked nightshifts except Saturday nights. My poor mother was on her own with two young children and some nights we were in the Anderson shelter from early evening until morning daylight. One night when Dad was at home the siren had just gone and I opened the back door, stood transfixed watching German planes fly overhead in the moonlight,so low I felt I could reach out and touch them. Next thing I was yanked in by the scruff of my neck and the door slammed shut. I remember the windows and black stuff covering them to prevent them shattering, and being frightened when one night a warden knocked on our door and said a chink of light was showing.

One night our shelter seemed to lift up out of the ground and settled back down, there was terrible noise, and we feared out house had been hit. Thankfully it was still there although lots of things had been thrown about and broken. A house in direct line to ours but a few streets away had gone, although fortunately no one was killed. I remember walking to primary school with my gas mask box across my chest and a torch, dark mornings - no parents walking with us let alone the school car run in those days!

I remember the morning Dad didn't come home and my mother was terrified for him,. After the All Clear we were at the upstairs bedroom window watching the crimson sky as Clydebank was blitzed. Dad eventually turned up safe and sound but exhausted, having walked home, and I think he had been fire fighting on the roof of the UCBS, although maybe got that wrong, childhood memories....

My mother used to take us down to Dunoon for summer holidays with my grandparents, by train and then steamer, and I remember the bleak sight from the train of row upon row of tenements bombed to pieces and wondering where all the people had gone. Also often the carriage was full of soldiers or airmen, and I think Americans as they gave us children sweets or chocolate and I remember sometimes also coupons for sweets. The Navy was in the waters off Dunoon, in the Holly Loch I think, the town full of them, and I remember the boom stretching from Dunoon across the water to the other side. The pebbled beach, out of bounds, covered in oil.

I remember VE celebrations, hanging a flag out of the upstairs bedroom window, going to George Square which was packed. So packed that there was some sort of panic and crush, people sceaming and sort of falling back on each other. My Dad lifted my brother up onto his shoulders and grabbed me one side, my mother the other side. Can't remember how we got away, but do remember we walked home and how wonderful it was as there were street parties in every street we passed, people singing and dancing and laughing.

Compared with what others suffered we were lucky, and not in the thick of it, although not far from Beardmore's and other munition factories. For years afterwards I hated to hear sirens sound - can't remember what they were about though. Works sirens?

I also remember seeing Churchill drive along through Shettleston in an open car, waving.
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enrique
post 14th Aug 2009, 12:40pm
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ohmy.gif hi my story about the war is about my older sister,my father was a very strict bloke and hated you telling him a lie, my sister one night told him she was going with a friend to the local mission in Plantation, but she was really going to the pictures , when she arrived home after an air raid , my dad asked her where she went during the raid , to which she said the mission of course, the reply from her father shocked her as the mission had been bombed and a lot of the people died,needless to say my parents were relieved that she had turned up safe and so she escaped the usual wrath of her dad .
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dugald_old
post 16th Aug 2009, 11:17pm
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Lizziehen, I thoroughly enjoyed reading your story; you have a great memory for detail. Yes, you're right about the UCBS, it was on McNeil St. It certainly was a tough time for your mother alone with two small children every night and the possibility of air raids, but you all got through the war safely ...thanks in part I'm sure to your Anderson shelter. You seem to have had a wide variety of experiences, and reading through them with you brought back many of my own war time memories. Great story Lizziehen!
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dugald_old
post 16th Aug 2009, 11:23pm
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That's quite a story you have here as well Enrique. I recall the the bombing on Plantation St. On the night of the bombing I lived in Govan and not long after the blitz I visitied the site where the explosion took place; sure made a mess of the whole area. Rumour had it at the time that it was a "land mine" that hit the building.
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George Muir
post 17th Aug 2009, 01:26am
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Dugald you're right, it was a landmine, I believe these things came down on a kind of parachute which deceived many people into thinking it was a person. My family lived on Paisley Road West, about 3 streets along from Plantation St. and the blast dislodged our tenement block a few inches, so that we had to move right out of the area and ended up in Govanhill. Our nearest "shelter" was in Admiral Street. What struck me (8 years old at the time) as being a bit odd was that all folks in the shelter spoke in whispers!!!!
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