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> Ve Day, Have you any memories of it?
DannyH
post 8th May 2015, 10:55pm
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The VE Day commemoration ceremonies came second place to the General election results. It was almost as if they were a necessary ritual that leading politicians had to carry out. How different from the the actual VE Day.

I was only 13 when it occurred, but the memory of that day will never leave me. At first a few of the boys and girls who lived in the same tenement as me in the Garscube Raod went up to the tower at Ruchill Park which overlooked Glasgow. We went there because during the war you could see the barrage balloons spread across the sky above Glasgow. Now we new we would be safe and the balloons would be gone.

Then I went down to Geoarge Square by myself. It wasn't easy to get into the Square. Thousands of people filled the streets all the way to the Square from every direction. You just felt the sheer joy pumping through everybody's veins. You wanted it to last forever.

The girl I married lived in the same tenement as me. She recalls sitting on top of an air-raid shelter
in Oakbank Terrace watching the adults dancing, when an American soldier lifted her down and started jiving with her. Made her feel grown up! She was only 12.

Got any memories?

Regards to All

Danny Harris
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Elma
post 9th May 2015, 12:17am
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I was in George Square that night too, I had just had my 10th birthday. My Dad, Mum and I had just returned from my grandparents home in Annan, we came by train to St.Enochs and because of the celebrations we made our way to George Square. I remember being surrounded by, to me, tall people, but I was able to hear the broadcasts relayed to us of both Churchill and KIng George. It is a night I have always remembered.
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Rab
post 9th May 2015, 07:03pm
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(Copied over from 'On this Day')


I posted this photo of VE Day in my street on here before, but it seems more apt to show it again today. I am sure it mirroes many streets throughout Glasgow and Scotland that mementous day. Perhaps you have similar photos?
My father was still at sea on that day and he had hardly seen me in my 3 years. Apart from 2 sailors, not many men in the picture as most were overseas.
My mammy is marked with a X. I think I am wearing a 'pixie-hood'! Rab - the first hoodie! laugh.gif
Tennant Street, Renfrew. Note blast walls at closes which were the first thing to disappear. The tenements lasted till 1967.

Attached Image


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Back to using my original name... Rab
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taurus
post 9th May 2015, 10:46pm
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that's a great photo Rab,I never expected to see a baffle wall in my life again,but I do remember them from my childhood,they weren`t up every close in the street.I was 5,so VE day passed me by,but a year later VJ day,I remember vividly.here we`re not allowed to say VJ day,because Australia is friendly with japan,we have to say VP (victory in the Pacific).a
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taurus
post 10th May 2015, 03:08am
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oops VJ day was only months after VE day. I was 6 not 5,oh well it was a long time ago,I can still see the big bonfire in our street and the people laughing and dancing.
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DannyH
post 17th May 2015, 06:04pm
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My thanks to Elma, Rab and Taurus for their posts on this Topic.
Great picture Rab.


Over the years we saw the veterans of World WarI diminishing in numbers with each Armistice Day and now the same is happening to the World WarII veterans.

I am sure there must be quite a few 'old timers' who were alive on VE Day, still here to tell their stories. It is a creepy thought, but those of you who were under 10 years old on VE day will soon be the only ones left to tell the tale. Make sure you write down your story for future generations to read.

Regards

Danny
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taurus
post 18th May 2015, 02:49am
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That is very good advice Danny,I never encouraged my mum to talk all about her multitude of relations,and those on my dad`s side,and he died when I was 2 so I know nothing of that,now my mum is dead,every one of her siblings too,so there is no one left to ask,and I`d love to more of my roots and bygone days.
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Scots Kiwi Lass
post 18th May 2015, 11:01am
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I was three when WW2 ended and have memories of a party in Hinshaw Street, with bunting strung across the street from window to window. There were trestle tables laden with food, people singing and dancing and someone playing the bagpipes. At that age, I wouldn't have been aware of the reason for the party but I am convinced it was celebrating the end of the War.

As a matter of interest, Danny, I have written my life story (from my birth in 1942 till the time of my retirement in 2007), including my family's life in Maryhill. I took me 3 years to finish it and was written for my son, daughter and grand-daughter. I felt that even if they were not particularly interested at that time they could well be when they get older, say in their 60's. I know I have always regretted not talking to my Dad about the time he served in the Merchant Navy during the War. He died in 1992 aged 84 and I am sure he would have been glad to talk about those years if only someone had asked him. It's part of the reason I told my story - someone may be interested one day and I loved doing it.

Now I am thinking of writing an addendum with more memories I have since thought of. Maybe a good plan for the cold winter days ahead and probably a good idea to complete it while I am still interested in computers!


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Rab
post 18th May 2015, 05:58pm
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This post reminds me of a strange coincidence of the VE anniversary and my own family. It was only last November that after a lifetime of wondering where my Canadian cousins were living, that I managed to find one of them.
It was through our correspondence that I learned that one of my cousins had joined the American Air Force and was a bomber pilot when his B17 was shot down over Germany. He was imprisoned in Moosburg POW camp in south-east Germany. This camp was built to contain 10,000 POW's. When the war ended it 'housed' ( thousands slept in tents) 134,000! My cousin Jim survived escaping from a burning aircraft and expected to be treated in accordance with the Geneva Convention, instead, he with thousands of others was treated with cruelty and starvation. The coincidence I mentioned was that, at the time, I was reading a book about the fate of Allied POWs when the war was nearing its end. The Germans force-marched many thousands of POWs eastwards across Germany and Poland in the worst winter for decades, in starvation conditions, little clothing or medical care. I cannot describe how terrible were the conditions faced by these men, one of whom was my cousin Jim. When we watch POW films on film and TV, it's a joke compared with what it was really like. Ths brought home to me personally, once again, the enormous debt we all owe to the servicemen who fought to bring an end to the Nazi regime and Hitler's madness.
VE day was certainly a day to celebrate, and I feel sure that Jim was glad that his suffering was over at last. He died in 1975. Sadly, I never met him.


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Heather
post 18th May 2015, 07:49pm
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I have a vague memory of people dancing and singing in the street.

My husband said he does not remember much either except for his dad coming home after the war.
His dad was a Sergeant in the Black Watch and one of the hundred's of soldiers stranded in Dunkirk.
His dad got shot in the arm trying to get into one of the boat's that came to rescue the soldier's. Lucky for him he had a thick head of hair as another soldier grabbed him by the hair and hauled him out the sea, so he lived to tell the tale
The shot in the arm caused some damage that caused him problem's all his life. But his arm was patched up and he was sent back to the war until the end.


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Heather.......I'm tartan. Alba gu Brath. Saor Alba
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*Jackie Kelly*
post 23rd Mar 2017, 07:09pm
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Rab, my father in law is in hospital just now and was thrilled to see this photo of the Tennant Street party as he is in the picture and talks of this day often! Frank Kelly who lived at no.5, do you remember him? He also talks about the time a soldier brought bananas back from war and there was a raffle to win the bananas (it cost everyone a sixpence) and when a young lassie won them all the boys chased after her and stole one from her.
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